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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Ruffing, Kathy A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    About 6 percent of the nation’s working-age population receives disability payments from Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and people who depend on those benefits live in every state, county, and congressional district. Nevertheless, there’s a distinct “geography of disability.” Some states, chiefly in the South and Appalachia, have much higher rates of receipt — nearly twice the national average. In contrast, states along the Washington-to-Boston corridor (where many policymakers and opinion leaders live), on the West Coast, and in the Great Plains and Mountain West have relatively few disability beneficiaries.

    While some critics see this disparity as evidence of problems with the programs, it mostly reflects a few key demographic and economic factors. In a nutshell, states with high rates of disability receipt tend to have populations that are less educated, older, and more blue-collar than other states; they also have fewer immigrants. In fact, those four factors alone are associated with about 85 percent of the variation...

    About 6 percent of the nation’s working-age population receives disability payments from Social Security Disability Insurance (DI) or Supplemental Security Income (SSI), and people who depend on those benefits live in every state, county, and congressional district. Nevertheless, there’s a distinct “geography of disability.” Some states, chiefly in the South and Appalachia, have much higher rates of receipt — nearly twice the national average. In contrast, states along the Washington-to-Boston corridor (where many policymakers and opinion leaders live), on the West Coast, and in the Great Plains and Mountain West have relatively few disability beneficiaries.

    While some critics see this disparity as evidence of problems with the programs, it mostly reflects a few key demographic and economic factors. In a nutshell, states with high rates of disability receipt tend to have populations that are less educated, older, and more blue-collar than other states; they also have fewer immigrants. In fact, those four factors alone are associated with about 85 percent of the variation in disability receipt rates across states. Furthermore, those factors are directly or indirectly related to the programs’ eligibility criteria. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Livermore, Gina; Bardos, Maura
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The Great Recession (December 2007 to June 2009) had far-reaching impacts on the U.S. economy, but it likely had a different effect on beneficiaries of the Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs than on other working-age individuals. This may be due to beneficiaries’ weak attachment to the labor force and the recession’s minimal impact on a primary source of their income, SSA benefits. This brief describes the experiences of working age beneficiaries of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) from 2006 to 2010 (a period beginning before and ending after the Great Recession), comparing their experiences with those of working-age nonbeneficiaries. We also present post-recession statistics through 2012 for selected measures of employment and economic well-being. (author abstract)

    The Great Recession (December 2007 to June 2009) had far-reaching impacts on the U.S. economy, but it likely had a different effect on beneficiaries of the Social Security Administration (SSA) disability programs than on other working-age individuals. This may be due to beneficiaries’ weak attachment to the labor force and the recession’s minimal impact on a primary source of their income, SSA benefits. This brief describes the experiences of working age beneficiaries of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) and Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) from 2006 to 2010 (a period beginning before and ending after the Great Recession), comparing their experiences with those of working-age nonbeneficiaries. We also present post-recession statistics through 2012 for selected measures of employment and economic well-being. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Tambornino, John ; Crouse, Gilbert; Winston, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, which includes children under age 18 with disabilities from low-income households, has grown in recent decades. This research brief examines national trends in the child SSI program between 1991-2011 with a focus on the program’s reach and cost. It compares the child SSI program to other SSI program age groups and to other major federal safety net programs that serve children. The child SSI program remains the smallest of these federal safety net programs in terms of number of recipients, but federal expenditures for the program now exceed federal and state expenditures for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program cash benefits to children, which have declined in recent years. Future ASPE Research Briefs will examine state and county variation in child SSI program participation, and diverse policy and program environments in four states to identify factors that may influence program participation. (author abstract)

    The federal Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, which includes children under age 18 with disabilities from low-income households, has grown in recent decades. This research brief examines national trends in the child SSI program between 1991-2011 with a focus on the program’s reach and cost. It compares the child SSI program to other SSI program age groups and to other major federal safety net programs that serve children. The child SSI program remains the smallest of these federal safety net programs in terms of number of recipients, but federal expenditures for the program now exceed federal and state expenditures for Temporary Assistance to Needy Families (TANF) program cash benefits to children, which have declined in recent years. Future ASPE Research Briefs will examine state and county variation in child SSI program participation, and diverse policy and program environments in four states to identify factors that may influence program participation. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2015

    This set of SSRC Selections focuses on disabilities and employment. Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of SSRC Selections focuses on disabilities and employment. Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Speanburg, Katie; Juras, Randall; Patel, Amar; Schneider, Glen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    The road to employment and economic self-sufficiency is considerably steeper for those youth who face some type of physical, sensory, cognitive, mental health, or other disability. The U. S. Department of Labor is actively addressing the needs and interests of individuals with disabilities through policy guidance, research, staffing and program support as well as technical assistance and training. The Department conducted a study to examine the public workforce system’s current efforts to serve youth with disabilities. The study profiles the implementation of various practices intended to support this effort and identifies factors that may pose barriers to the provision of targeted services. Additionally, the study provides recommendations to help shape future programs, policies, technical assistance and research initiatives related to serving youth with disabilities. 

    The cornerstone of this research is a survey of representatives from LWIBs on a range of topics relating to serving youth with disabilities. The data were gathered via an on line survey and completed by 69...

    The road to employment and economic self-sufficiency is considerably steeper for those youth who face some type of physical, sensory, cognitive, mental health, or other disability. The U. S. Department of Labor is actively addressing the needs and interests of individuals with disabilities through policy guidance, research, staffing and program support as well as technical assistance and training. The Department conducted a study to examine the public workforce system’s current efforts to serve youth with disabilities. The study profiles the implementation of various practices intended to support this effort and identifies factors that may pose barriers to the provision of targeted services. Additionally, the study provides recommendations to help shape future programs, policies, technical assistance and research initiatives related to serving youth with disabilities. 

    The cornerstone of this research is a survey of representatives from LWIBs on a range of topics relating to serving youth with disabilities. The data were gathered via an on line survey and completed by 69 percent of the LWIB Executive Directors or designees. This report presents a summary of the survey results. In addition to gathering general perspectives and challenges inherent in serving youth with disabilities, the analyses examined the extent to which LWIBs: (1) use customized assessments to identify participant needs and develop service plans; (2) provide training to build staff capacity to better serve this population; (3) expand their resource base through partnerships and combining funding streams; (4) actively target the out-of-school population of youth with disabilities; and (5) provide employment and community service opportunities.

    This study is the first to describe the programmatic and environmental context that shapes the provision of services to youth with disabilities by the workforce development system at the local level. Gathering first hand insights from practitioners provides important information that can be used to improve policy and practices for this population. (author abstract) 

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