Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: United States Senate Committee on Health, Education, Labor & Pensions
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    America changed when the Americans with Disability Act was signed into law over twenty-four years ago. In 1990, the civil rights of people with disabilities that were fought for by disability advocates and their allies became the law of the land.

    With the passage of the ADA, people with disabilities were guaranteed the right to equal access to employment, state and local government services, commercial facilities and businesses, transportation, and telecommunications. This meant, for the first time in the history of the United States, that those with physical, mental, intellectual, sensory, and chronic health disabilities had the right to be able to enter a local courthouse, to be able to cross the street, to be able to attend a movie or baseball game, to be able to dine in a local restaurant, or to be considered for employment based on their skills and knowledge rather than to be dismissed from consideration because of their disability…

    However, for many of those with disabilities, two areas of American life have been stubbornly resistant to change: employment and...

    America changed when the Americans with Disability Act was signed into law over twenty-four years ago. In 1990, the civil rights of people with disabilities that were fought for by disability advocates and their allies became the law of the land.

    With the passage of the ADA, people with disabilities were guaranteed the right to equal access to employment, state and local government services, commercial facilities and businesses, transportation, and telecommunications. This meant, for the first time in the history of the United States, that those with physical, mental, intellectual, sensory, and chronic health disabilities had the right to be able to enter a local courthouse, to be able to cross the street, to be able to attend a movie or baseball game, to be able to dine in a local restaurant, or to be considered for employment based on their skills and knowledge rather than to be dismissed from consideration because of their disability…

    However, for many of those with disabilities, two areas of American life have been stubbornly resistant to change: employment and participation in the middle class. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory B.; Zhang, Sisi
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    For households headed by persons with disabilities, savings can provide near-term protection against hardship. Analysis of longitudinal data from the 2001 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation indicates that households with $2,000 or more in liquid assets (interest-earning assets held at financial institutions) are better able to avoid subsequent hardships such as forgone doctor visits and missed utility payments, compared to those with smaller (or no) asset holdings. This evidence has implications for possible increases in the resource limits for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, now $2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for couples. (author abstract)

    For households headed by persons with disabilities, savings can provide near-term protection against hardship. Analysis of longitudinal data from the 2001 panel of the Survey of Income and Program Participation indicates that households with $2,000 or more in liquid assets (interest-earning assets held at financial institutions) are better able to avoid subsequent hardships such as forgone doctor visits and missed utility payments, compared to those with smaller (or no) asset holdings. This evidence has implications for possible increases in the resource limits for the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program, now $2,000 for individuals and $3,000 for couples. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dahlem, Katherine Anne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The University of Wisconsin’s Center for Financial Security and Abt Associates Inc. conducted four focus groups with adults with disabilities who are working or interested in working, and four focus groups with parents or guardians of children with disabilities who are aging out of the school system. The purpose of these eight focus groups was to gather information on how people with disabilities and their families address financial and estate planning, understand eligibility rules and regulations, seek and maintain employment, interact with local school systems, and share lessons learned. Study findings suggest that the dissemination of information about financial and estate planning, benefit rules and regulations, employment opportunities, and effective special education models is vital to people with disabilities and their caregivers in order to help them address long-term financial and care needs. (author abstract)

    The University of Wisconsin’s Center for Financial Security and Abt Associates Inc. conducted four focus groups with adults with disabilities who are working or interested in working, and four focus groups with parents or guardians of children with disabilities who are aging out of the school system. The purpose of these eight focus groups was to gather information on how people with disabilities and their families address financial and estate planning, understand eligibility rules and regulations, seek and maintain employment, interact with local school systems, and share lessons learned. Study findings suggest that the dissemination of information about financial and estate planning, benefit rules and regulations, employment opportunities, and effective special education models is vital to people with disabilities and their caregivers in order to help them address long-term financial and care needs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wiseman, Michael
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2008

    Welfare-to-work policies seek to build human capital by encouraging and facilitating greater or more beneficial participation in labor markets. Effective policies not only increase income but also generally raise the return to additional human capital investment. What are possibly effective policies? How can we know if they would be effective? How do we know if they are desirable?

    In this chapter I answer the first two questions by proposing several policy demonstrations. Each of the demonstrations is motivated to some extent by existing research. Its execution would generate information that would enable researchers to determine its effectiveness. I answer the third question by reviewing the application of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) to the Minnesota Family Investment Program, one of the most important state initiatives in the welfare policy area in terms of breadth of assessment and contribution to policy development. (Edited author introduction)

    Welfare-to-work policies seek to build human capital by encouraging and facilitating greater or more beneficial participation in labor markets. Effective policies not only increase income but also generally raise the return to additional human capital investment. What are possibly effective policies? How can we know if they would be effective? How do we know if they are desirable?

    In this chapter I answer the first two questions by proposing several policy demonstrations. Each of the demonstrations is motivated to some extent by existing research. Its execution would generate information that would enable researchers to determine its effectiveness. I answer the third question by reviewing the application of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) to the Minnesota Family Investment Program, one of the most important state initiatives in the welfare policy area in terms of breadth of assessment and contribution to policy development. (Edited author introduction)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2008 to 2014

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations