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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

     

    Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    Children living in poverty are more likely to have mental health problems, and their conditions are more likely to be severe. Of the approximately 1.3 million children who were recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits in 2013, about 50% were disabled primarily due to a mental disorder. An increase in the number of children who are recipients of SSI benefits due to mental disorders has been observed through several decades of the program beginning in 1985 and continuing through 2010. Nevertheless, less than 1% of children in the United States are recipients of SSI disability benefits for a mental disorder. (Author introduction)

    Children living in poverty are more likely to have mental health problems, and their conditions are more likely to be severe. Of the approximately 1.3 million children who were recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits in 2013, about 50% were disabled primarily due to a mental disorder. An increase in the number of children who are recipients of SSI benefits due to mental disorders has been observed through several decades of the program beginning in 1985 and continuing through 2010. Nevertheless, less than 1% of children in the United States are recipients of SSI disability benefits for a mental disorder. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ford Shah, Melissa; Mancuso, David C.; He, Lijian; Kozak, Stephen
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    This study examines the effectiveness of Washington State’s Medicaid Buy-In (MBI) program—Healthcare for Workers With Disabilities (HWD)—which gives workers with disabilities who earn too much for conventional Medicaid the opportunity to purchase full Medicaid coverage by paying a monthly premium based on a sliding income scale. The authors compare HWD enrollees who recently had conventional Medicaid coverage to a statistically matched group of individuals who had conventional Medicaid coverage in recent history and at baseline. Their findings suggest that MBI in Washington State is encouraging work, increasing earnings, and decreasing reliance on food stamps while providing medical coverage to a vulnerable population for whom continuous health insurance is particularly important. (Author abstract)

    This study examines the effectiveness of Washington State’s Medicaid Buy-In (MBI) program—Healthcare for Workers With Disabilities (HWD)—which gives workers with disabilities who earn too much for conventional Medicaid the opportunity to purchase full Medicaid coverage by paying a monthly premium based on a sliding income scale. The authors compare HWD enrollees who recently had conventional Medicaid coverage to a statistically matched group of individuals who had conventional Medicaid coverage in recent history and at baseline. Their findings suggest that MBI in Washington State is encouraging work, increasing earnings, and decreasing reliance on food stamps while providing medical coverage to a vulnerable population for whom continuous health insurance is particularly important. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Liu, Su; Croake, Sarah
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants...

    The Medicaid Buy-In program is a key component of the federal effort to make it easier for people with disabilities to work without losing health benefits. Authorized by the Balanced Budget Act of 1997 (BBA) and the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999 (Ticket Act), the Buy-In program allows states to expand Medicaid coverage to workers with disabilities whose income and assets would ordinarily make them ineligible for Medicaid. To be eligible for the Buy-In program, an individual must have a disability (as defined by the Social Security Administration, SSA) and earned income, and must meet other financial eligibility requirements established by states. States have some flexibility to customize their Buy-In programs to their unique needs, resources and objectives. As of December 31, 2009, 37 states with a Medicaid Infrastructure Grant (MIG) reported covering slightly more than 150,000 individuals in the Medicaid Buy-In program.

    This issue brief, the eleventh in a series on workers with disabilities, provides an in-depth profile of Buy-In participants who have severe mental illness and compares their characteristics, employment experiences, and medical expenditures with those of other participants in the program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Fox, Harriette B.; McManus, Margaret A.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1998

    The rapid transition of state Medicaid beneficiaries into fully capitated managed care plans requires a special focus on children with chronic or disabling conditions, who often depend on numerous pediatric physicians and other specialty services for health care and related services. Because managed care arrangements for this population are growing in popularity nationwide, it is important that states craft managed care contracts to address the unique needs of children with complex physical, developmental, and mental health problems. Based on the research reported in this article, in-depth interviews with state Medicaid agency staff, interviews with medical directors and administrators of managed care plans serving Medicaid recipients, and input from experts in pediatrics and managed care, a set of recommendations is made for tailoring managed care contracts to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of children.

    Six contracting elements that should be adopted by state Medicaid agencies include (1) clarifying the specificity of...

    The rapid transition of state Medicaid beneficiaries into fully capitated managed care plans requires a special focus on children with chronic or disabling conditions, who often depend on numerous pediatric physicians and other specialty services for health care and related services. Because managed care arrangements for this population are growing in popularity nationwide, it is important that states craft managed care contracts to address the unique needs of children with complex physical, developmental, and mental health problems. Based on the research reported in this article, in-depth interviews with state Medicaid agency staff, interviews with medical directors and administrators of managed care plans serving Medicaid recipients, and input from experts in pediatrics and managed care, a set of recommendations is made for tailoring managed care contracts to meet the needs of this vulnerable group of children.

    Six contracting elements that should be adopted by state Medicaid agencies include (1) clarifying the specificity of pediatric benefits, (2) defining appropriate pediatric provider capacity requirements, (3) developing a medical necessity standard specific to children, (4) identifying pediatric quality-of-care measures, (5) setting appropriate pediatric capitation rates, and (6) creating incentives for high-quality pediatric care.

    Nine approaches that should be adopted by managed care practices interested in providing high-quality care for children with special needs also are identified. These include (1) ensuring that assigned primary care providers have appropriate training and experience, (2) offering support systems for primary care practices, (3) providing specialty consultation for primary care providers, (4) establishing arrangements for the comanagement of primary and specialty pediatric services, (5) arranging for comprehensive care coordination, (6) establishing flexible service authorization policies, (7) implementing provider profiling systems that adjust for pediatric case mix, (8) creating financial incentives for serving children with special needs, and (9) encouraging family involvement in plan operations.

    Implementing these changes to managed care contracting could have a major impact on the quality and comprehensiveness of health care received by children with special needs. Successful implementation, however, requires strong support from both state Medicaid agencies and the managed care plans dedicated to serving this population. (author abstract)