Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: The Stanford Center on Poverty and Inequality; The Russell Sage Foundation
    Reference Type: Dataset
    Year: 2013

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

    Description: Recession Trends provides 16 up-to-date briefs by top scholars addressing recent trends in wealth, consumption, the labor market, housing, poverty, safety net systems, health, education, crime, attitudes, and a variety of other domains. The site also archives over a thousand time series and allows visitors to build their own graphs representing  key trends in 16 domain areas.

    Population: The data for Recession Trends come from dozens of high-quality data sets.  Full source and methodological information is provided on the site for each time series.

    Periodicity: The data are updated annually and, for some series, reach back a half-century or even longer.

    (Information adapted from the publisher)

  • Individual Author: Heflin, Colleen M.; Wilmoth, Janet M.; London, Andrew S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    Veterans are a sizable and policy-relevant demographic group in the United States, yet little is known about their economic well-being. Although having a work-limiting disability is known to be associated with material hardship, no known study compares material hardship between veteran households and nonveteran households or investigates whether work-limiting disability moderates the association between veteran status and material hardship. This study uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to examine how household work-limiting disability status moderates the relationship between veteran status and the likelihood of material hardship. Results suggest the following: nondisabled-veteran households report lower or equivalent levels of material hardship than do households with no veteran or disabled member; regardless of whether a veteran is present, households that include a disabled person have higher levels of every type of hardship than other households do; and disabled-veteran households experience statistically significantly more hardship than nondisabled...

    Veterans are a sizable and policy-relevant demographic group in the United States, yet little is known about their economic well-being. Although having a work-limiting disability is known to be associated with material hardship, no known study compares material hardship between veteran households and nonveteran households or investigates whether work-limiting disability moderates the association between veteran status and material hardship. This study uses data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to examine how household work-limiting disability status moderates the relationship between veteran status and the likelihood of material hardship. Results suggest the following: nondisabled-veteran households report lower or equivalent levels of material hardship than do households with no veteran or disabled member; regardless of whether a veteran is present, households that include a disabled person have higher levels of every type of hardship than other households do; and disabled-veteran households experience statistically significantly more hardship than nondisabled-veteran households do. (author abstract)

    This resource is based on a working paper that was previously published by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan.

  • Individual Author: London, Andrew S.; Heflin, Colleen M.; Wilmoth, Janet M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    The authors examine the interrelationships between work-related disability, veteran, and poverty statuses using data from the 1992–2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. They find that households with nondisabled veterans present have a lower likelihood of poverty, but that advantage is severely eroded when the veteran or another family member has a work-limiting disability. Nevertheless, all veteran households have substantially lower odds of poverty than disabled nonveteran households, which have the highest poverty rate (32.53%). Veteran and disability statuses interact at the household level in ways that contribute to substantial variability in household-level poverty, which has implications for all household members. (author abstract)

    Resource was published previously as a working paper by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan.

    The authors examine the interrelationships between work-related disability, veteran, and poverty statuses using data from the 1992–2004 panels of the Survey of Income and Program Participation. They find that households with nondisabled veterans present have a lower likelihood of poverty, but that advantage is severely eroded when the veteran or another family member has a work-limiting disability. Nevertheless, all veteran households have substantially lower odds of poverty than disabled nonveteran households, which have the highest poverty rate (32.53%). Veteran and disability statuses interact at the household level in ways that contribute to substantial variability in household-level poverty, which has implications for all household members. (author abstract)

    Resource was published previously as a working paper by the National Poverty Center at the University of Michigan.

  • Individual Author: Schmidt, Lucie; Danziger, Sheldon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    We analyze SSI applications and benefit receipt after the 1996 welfare reform by single mothers who received cash assistance in February 1997. We address these questions: First, what characteristics are associated with SSI applications and how do they differ between successful and unsuccessful applicants? Second, to what extent is SSI application and receipt status associated with material hardships? We find that unsuccessful applicants and SSI recipients have similar characteristics and that changes in physical and mental health problems during the panel are associated with new SSI applications. Both SSI recipients and unsuccessful applicants are significantly more likely to report any material hardship than those who did not apply for benefits. However, unsuccessful applicants report a significantly higher number of hardships. These results suggest the need for a temporary disability program for individuals whose physical and mental health problems limit their work, but whose disabilities do not meet the strict standards of SSI. (author abstract)

    We analyze SSI applications and benefit receipt after the 1996 welfare reform by single mothers who received cash assistance in February 1997. We address these questions: First, what characteristics are associated with SSI applications and how do they differ between successful and unsuccessful applicants? Second, to what extent is SSI application and receipt status associated with material hardships? We find that unsuccessful applicants and SSI recipients have similar characteristics and that changes in physical and mental health problems during the panel are associated with new SSI applications. Both SSI recipients and unsuccessful applicants are significantly more likely to report any material hardship than those who did not apply for benefits. However, unsuccessful applicants report a significantly higher number of hardships. These results suggest the need for a temporary disability program for individuals whose physical and mental health problems limit their work, but whose disabilities do not meet the strict standards of SSI. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Lee, Sunhwa; Oh, Gi-Taik; Hartmann, Heidi; Gault, Barbara
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2004

    This study examines the prevalence of disabilities among mothers and children and analyzes how these disabilities influence mothers’ work participation. Our analyses focus on differences between single and married mothers. We also consider the effect of social support coming from family configurations and living arrangements by including the age structures of children with and without a disability, and the number of other adults in the family. We find that mothers’ own disability status has a profound impact on mothers’ work participation—both continuous and partial work activities. Child disability also has a significant impact on mothers’ work participation, but not to as great an extent as the mother’s own disability. The impact of child disability also varies by children’s age between single and married mothers. Older healthy children have a positive influence on maternal work only among married mothers, while older children with a disability increase single mothers’ partial work activities. Having other adults in the family does not facilitate work participation of either...

    This study examines the prevalence of disabilities among mothers and children and analyzes how these disabilities influence mothers’ work participation. Our analyses focus on differences between single and married mothers. We also consider the effect of social support coming from family configurations and living arrangements by including the age structures of children with and without a disability, and the number of other adults in the family. We find that mothers’ own disability status has a profound impact on mothers’ work participation—both continuous and partial work activities. Child disability also has a significant impact on mothers’ work participation, but not to as great an extent as the mother’s own disability. The impact of child disability also varies by children’s age between single and married mothers. Older healthy children have a positive influence on maternal work only among married mothers, while older children with a disability increase single mothers’ partial work activities. Having other adults in the family does not facilitate work participation of either single or married mothers.  (author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 2004 to 2013

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations