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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Flaming, Daniel
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource, Report
    Year: 2011

    Counties bear large hidden costs for individuals with disabilities who are indigent or homeless.  This includes costs for health care, jails and probation in addition to readily identifiable county costs for public assistance.  A large share of this cost is health related – costs that the federal and state governments would pay through Medi-Cal if the individuals were receiving Supplemental Social Security Income (SSI).   

    This study examines opportunities for counties to avoid costs by moving individuals with disabilities who are General Relief recipients, medically indigent hospital patients, and homeless hospital patients onto SSI and Medi-Cal. (author introduction)

    Counties bear large hidden costs for individuals with disabilities who are indigent or homeless.  This includes costs for health care, jails and probation in addition to readily identifiable county costs for public assistance.  A large share of this cost is health related – costs that the federal and state governments would pay through Medi-Cal if the individuals were receiving Supplemental Social Security Income (SSI).   

    This study examines opportunities for counties to avoid costs by moving individuals with disabilities who are General Relief recipients, medically indigent hospital patients, and homeless hospital patients onto SSI and Medi-Cal. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Waidmann, Timothy; Schimmel, Jody; Reno, Virginia; Bound, John; Stapleton, David
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2010

    Because of gains in health and longevity among Americans, as well as concerns about financing Social Security, some policymakers are calling for reforms that will encourage workers to retire later. One proposed reform is raising the earliest eligibility age for Social Security (currently age 62). However, such changes might exacerbate the considerable financial difficulties of individuals who experience work-limiting health conditions as they approach retirement. In this forum, Timothy Waidmann presented findings on the extent to which the availability of Social Security retirement benefits at age 62 provided a safety net for those who are in poor health but do not receive disability benefits. Jody Schimmel presented findings on the earnings lost by workers age 50 and older after the onset of disability, the extent to which households are able to adjust to those losses, and the potential for policy changes to offset losses in earnings and income. Virginia Reno discussed the implications of these and other findings for potential reforms to the Social Security retirement and...

    Because of gains in health and longevity among Americans, as well as concerns about financing Social Security, some policymakers are calling for reforms that will encourage workers to retire later. One proposed reform is raising the earliest eligibility age for Social Security (currently age 62). However, such changes might exacerbate the considerable financial difficulties of individuals who experience work-limiting health conditions as they approach retirement. In this forum, Timothy Waidmann presented findings on the extent to which the availability of Social Security retirement benefits at age 62 provided a safety net for those who are in poor health but do not receive disability benefits. Jody Schimmel presented findings on the earnings lost by workers age 50 and older after the onset of disability, the extent to which households are able to adjust to those losses, and the potential for policy changes to offset losses in earnings and income. Virginia Reno discussed the implications of these and other findings for potential reforms to the Social Security retirement and disability systems. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mauldon, Jane; Speiglman, Richard; Sogar, Christina
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2010

    Raising children is a challenge for virtually all parents. It is made harder when a parent is disabled by poor physical health, mental illness, or learning barriers. In 2008-2009, about 31,000 California parents sufficiently disabled and poor to qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) were raising between them some 55,000 children with assistance from the child-only component of CalWORKs, California’s TANF program.

    Drawing on data from families in San Francisco, this brief aims to help policy makers assess how adequately the combination of SSI and CalWORKs meets the needs of these particularly vulnerable families. Many of these parents received CalWORKs themselves before their disability was fully recognized and they moved to SSI. Because SSI provides a much larger parent grant than does CalWORKs, and because SSI is not time-limited, it seems that with this shift in aid families should be better off.

    Under SSI, however, parents and their children are not automatically linked to social work or other services, even though the parents’ limitations are...

    Raising children is a challenge for virtually all parents. It is made harder when a parent is disabled by poor physical health, mental illness, or learning barriers. In 2008-2009, about 31,000 California parents sufficiently disabled and poor to qualify for Supplemental Security Income (SSI) were raising between them some 55,000 children with assistance from the child-only component of CalWORKs, California’s TANF program.

    Drawing on data from families in San Francisco, this brief aims to help policy makers assess how adequately the combination of SSI and CalWORKs meets the needs of these particularly vulnerable families. Many of these parents received CalWORKs themselves before their disability was fully recognized and they moved to SSI. Because SSI provides a much larger parent grant than does CalWORKs, and because SSI is not time-limited, it seems that with this shift in aid families should be better off.

    Under SSI, however, parents and their children are not automatically linked to social work or other services, even though the parents’ limitations are debilitating and the children are likely to be very poor for their entire childhood. The families rarely qualify for auxiliary supports such as transportation, subsidized child care, or behavioral health resources beyond Medi-Cal funded mental health or alcohol and drug services. 

    Additional non-financial strategies may be available to support healthy child development and adult wellbeing among SSI-parent families whose children are on CalWORKs. Since counties differ in their welfare funding, in aspects of CalWORKs program design, and in the extent and variety of resources available, the implications and conclusions to be drawn from this brief will differ from county to county. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gimm, Gilbert; Weathers, Bob
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2007

    The Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment (DMIE), a grant program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, awards funds to states to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that are intended to improve health care coverage and employment services for working adults with potentially disabling conditions such as diabetes and mental illness. Authorized by the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, the DMIE allows states to provide Medicaid-equivalent coverage or “wrap-around” coverage, which supplements existing health insurance. They also may offer employment-support and case management services that increase the likelihood of sustained employment. Four states were approved as of June 2007 under the most recent DMIE solicitation—Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, and Texas.

    This issue brief, the sixth in a series on workers with disabilities, reviews the rationale for the DMIE, the interventions in the four most recent DMIE states, the DMIE evaluation, and next steps in disseminating information about the effects...

    The Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment (DMIE), a grant program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, awards funds to states to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that are intended to improve health care coverage and employment services for working adults with potentially disabling conditions such as diabetes and mental illness. Authorized by the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, the DMIE allows states to provide Medicaid-equivalent coverage or “wrap-around” coverage, which supplements existing health insurance. They also may offer employment-support and case management services that increase the likelihood of sustained employment. Four states were approved as of June 2007 under the most recent DMIE solicitation—Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, and Texas.

    This issue brief, the sixth in a series on workers with disabilities, reviews the rationale for the DMIE, the interventions in the four most recent DMIE states, the DMIE evaluation, and next steps in disseminating information about the effects of these innovative demonstration projects. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Maag, Elaine
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2006

    The National Health Interview Survey - Disability supplement (NHIS-D) provides information that can be used to understand myriad topics related to health and disability. The survey provides comprehensive information on multiple disability conceptualizations that can be identified using information about health conditions (both physical and mental), activity limitations, and service receipt (e.g. SSI, SSDI, Vocational Rehabilitation). This provides flexibility for researchers in defining populations of interest. This paper provides a description of the data available in the NHIS-D and information on how the data can be used to better understand the lives of people with disabilities. (author abstract)

    The National Health Interview Survey - Disability supplement (NHIS-D) provides information that can be used to understand myriad topics related to health and disability. The survey provides comprehensive information on multiple disability conceptualizations that can be identified using information about health conditions (both physical and mental), activity limitations, and service receipt (e.g. SSI, SSDI, Vocational Rehabilitation). This provides flexibility for researchers in defining populations of interest. This paper provides a description of the data available in the NHIS-D and information on how the data can be used to better understand the lives of people with disabilities. (author abstract)

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