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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: National Academies of Sciences, Engineering, and Medicine
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    Children living in poverty are more likely to have mental health problems, and their conditions are more likely to be severe. Of the approximately 1.3 million children who were recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits in 2013, about 50% were disabled primarily due to a mental disorder. An increase in the number of children who are recipients of SSI benefits due to mental disorders has been observed through several decades of the program beginning in 1985 and continuing through 2010. Nevertheless, less than 1% of children in the United States are recipients of SSI disability benefits for a mental disorder. (Author introduction)

    Children living in poverty are more likely to have mental health problems, and their conditions are more likely to be severe. Of the approximately 1.3 million children who were recipients of Supplemental Security Income (SSI) disability benefits in 2013, about 50% were disabled primarily due to a mental disorder. An increase in the number of children who are recipients of SSI benefits due to mental disorders has been observed through several decades of the program beginning in 1985 and continuing through 2010. Nevertheless, less than 1% of children in the United States are recipients of SSI disability benefits for a mental disorder. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Hogan, Dennis
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2012

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other national policies are designed to ensure the greatest possible inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of American life. But as a matter of national policy we still place the lion’s share of responsibility for raising children with disabilities on their families. While this strategy largely works, sociologist Dennis Hogan maintains, the reality is that family financial security, the parents’ relationship, and the needs of other children in the home all can be stretched to the limit. In Family Consequences of Children’s Disabilities Hogan delves inside the experiences of these families and examines the financial and emotional costs of raising a child with a disability. The book examines the challenges families of children with disabilities encounter and how these challenges impact family life.

    The first comprehensive account of the families of children with disabilities, Family Consequences of Children’s Disabilities employs data culled from seven national surveys and interviews with twenty-four mothers of...

    The Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and other national policies are designed to ensure the greatest possible inclusion of people with disabilities in all aspects of American life. But as a matter of national policy we still place the lion’s share of responsibility for raising children with disabilities on their families. While this strategy largely works, sociologist Dennis Hogan maintains, the reality is that family financial security, the parents’ relationship, and the needs of other children in the home all can be stretched to the limit. In Family Consequences of Children’s Disabilities Hogan delves inside the experiences of these families and examines the financial and emotional costs of raising a child with a disability. The book examines the challenges families of children with disabilities encounter and how these challenges impact family life.

    The first comprehensive account of the families of children with disabilities, Family Consequences of Children’s Disabilities employs data culled from seven national surveys and interviews with twenty-four mothers of children with disabilities, asking them questions about their family life, social supports, and how other children in the home were faring. Not surprisingly, Hogan finds that couples who are together when their child is born have a higher likelihood of divorcing than other parents do. The potential for financial insecurity contributes to this anxiety, especially as many parents must strike a careful balance between employment and caregiving. Mothers are less likely to have paid employment, and the financial burden on single parents can be devastating. One-third of children with disabilities live in single-parent households, and nearly 30 percent of families raising a child with a disability live in poverty.

    Because of the high levels of stress these families incur, support networks are crucial. Grandparents are often a source of support. Siblings can also assist with personal care and, consequently, tend to develop more helpful attitudes, be more inclusive of others, and be more tolerant. But these siblings are at risk for their own health problems: they are three times more likely to experience poor health than children in homes where there is no child with a disability. Yet this book also shows that raising a child with a disability includes unexpected rewards—the families tend to be closer, and they engage in more shared activities such as games, television, and meals.

    Family Consequences of Children’s Disabilities offers access to a world many never see or prefer to ignore. The book provides vital information on effective treatment, rehabilitation, and enablement to medical professionals, educators, social workers, and lawmakers. This compelling book demonstrates that every mirror has two faces: raising a child with a disability can be difficult, but it can also offer expanded understanding. (author abstract)

    Table of Contents:

    • Chapter 1: Families’ Experiences with Children’s Disabilities 
    • Chapter 2: Methods to Study Family Consequences of Children’s Disabilities
    • Chapter 3: Supporting, Growing, and Dissolving the Family
    • Chapter 4: Family Life, Social Support, and Religious Activities
    • Chapter 5: Parents, Adolescent Children with Disabilities, and the Transition to Adulthood
    • Chapter 6: The Lives of Brothers and Sisters 
    • Chapter 7: Parents’ Struggles for Disability Services 
    • Chapter 8: Conclusions 
  • Individual Author: Wiseman, Michael
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2008

    Welfare-to-work policies seek to build human capital by encouraging and facilitating greater or more beneficial participation in labor markets. Effective policies not only increase income but also generally raise the return to additional human capital investment. What are possibly effective policies? How can we know if they would be effective? How do we know if they are desirable?

    In this chapter I answer the first two questions by proposing several policy demonstrations. Each of the demonstrations is motivated to some extent by existing research. Its execution would generate information that would enable researchers to determine its effectiveness. I answer the third question by reviewing the application of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) to the Minnesota Family Investment Program, one of the most important state initiatives in the welfare policy area in terms of breadth of assessment and contribution to policy development. (Edited author introduction)

    Welfare-to-work policies seek to build human capital by encouraging and facilitating greater or more beneficial participation in labor markets. Effective policies not only increase income but also generally raise the return to additional human capital investment. What are possibly effective policies? How can we know if they would be effective? How do we know if they are desirable?

    In this chapter I answer the first two questions by proposing several policy demonstrations. Each of the demonstrations is motivated to some extent by existing research. Its execution would generate information that would enable researchers to determine its effectiveness. I answer the third question by reviewing the application of cost-benefit analysis (CBA) to the Minnesota Family Investment Program, one of the most important state initiatives in the welfare policy area in terms of breadth of assessment and contribution to policy development. (Edited author introduction)

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