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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Pavetti, LaDonna; Derr, Michelle K.; Kauff, Jacqueline F.; Barrett, Allison
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2010

    Objective: In recent years, welfare caseloads have declined dramatically, leaving on the rolls recipients with mental disorders or other challenges that may affect their ability to work. This study identified Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients (that is, welfare recipients) who use mental health services, compared them with Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients, and estimated the number of TANF recipients who might qualify for SSI. Methods: Based on data from the 2003 Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) files from four states, this analysis included female Medicaid beneficiaries aged 19 to 64 in fee-for-service payment systems receiving SSI (N=65,303) or TANF (N=22,691). Results: Thirteen percent of TANF beneficiaries and 32% of SSI beneficiaries with Medicaid claims had a mental disorder. Common disorders among TANF beneficiaries included neurotic and other depressive disorders and major depression and affective psychoses. Eleven percent of TANF recipients had levels of...

    Objective: In recent years, welfare caseloads have declined dramatically, leaving on the rolls recipients with mental disorders or other challenges that may affect their ability to work. This study identified Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients (that is, welfare recipients) who use mental health services, compared them with Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients, and estimated the number of TANF recipients who might qualify for SSI. Methods: Based on data from the 2003 Medicaid Analytic eXtract (MAX) files from four states, this analysis included female Medicaid beneficiaries aged 19 to 64 in fee-for-service payment systems receiving SSI (N=65,303) or TANF (N=22,691). Results: Thirteen percent of TANF beneficiaries and 32% of SSI beneficiaries with Medicaid claims had a mental disorder. Common disorders among TANF beneficiaries included neurotic and other depressive disorders and major depression and affective psychoses. Eleven percent of TANF recipients had levels of service use comparable with those of SSI recipients. Conclusions: The proportion of TANF recipients using mental health services was lower than the proportion of TANF recipients identified through surveys as having a mental disorder, most likely because some TANF recipients had mental disorders that were undiagnosed and untreated. Among those using services, some had patterns of use indicating potential eligibility for SSI, but most appeared to have more modest limitations. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gimm, Gilbert; Weathers, Bob
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2007

    The Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment (DMIE), a grant program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, awards funds to states to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that are intended to improve health care coverage and employment services for working adults with potentially disabling conditions such as diabetes and mental illness. Authorized by the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, the DMIE allows states to provide Medicaid-equivalent coverage or “wrap-around” coverage, which supplements existing health insurance. They also may offer employment-support and case management services that increase the likelihood of sustained employment. Four states were approved as of June 2007 under the most recent DMIE solicitation—Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, and Texas.

    This issue brief, the sixth in a series on workers with disabilities, reviews the rationale for the DMIE, the interventions in the four most recent DMIE states, the DMIE evaluation, and next steps in disseminating information about the effects...

    The Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment (DMIE), a grant program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, awards funds to states to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that are intended to improve health care coverage and employment services for working adults with potentially disabling conditions such as diabetes and mental illness. Authorized by the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, the DMIE allows states to provide Medicaid-equivalent coverage or “wrap-around” coverage, which supplements existing health insurance. They also may offer employment-support and case management services that increase the likelihood of sustained employment. Four states were approved as of June 2007 under the most recent DMIE solicitation—Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, and Texas.

    This issue brief, the sixth in a series on workers with disabilities, reviews the rationale for the DMIE, the interventions in the four most recent DMIE states, the DMIE evaluation, and next steps in disseminating information about the effects of these innovative demonstration projects. (author abstract)