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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Benton, Amanda; Dunton, Lauren; Khadduri, Jill; Walton, Douglas
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    These PowerPoints are from the 2018 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS). The Homeless Families Research Briefs project uses data from a large randomized controlled trial, the Family Options Study, to answer questions that are of interest to the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). This panel included presentations on three aspects of homeless families that may help HHS ensure that the agency’s programs and policies are used to assist families that have experienced homelessness in becoming self-sufficient. Amanda Benton (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Schwabish, Jonathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services. (Author abstract)

    This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Henry, Alexis; Laszlo, Aniko; Nicholson, Joanne
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2015

    Collaboration among employment service providers has been suggested as one strategy for enhancing outcomes for people with disabilities. Yet, little research exists on the process of collaboration building or factors that contribute to effective collaboration among employment providers. We engaged partners of five Regional Employment Collaboratives (RECs) in Massachusetts to identify the critical elements needed to build and sustain an employment collaborative. We used concept mapping, a mixed-method approach that included brainstorming sessions during which REC partners generated statements in response to the research question – what does it take to build and sustain an employment collaborative? Partners sorted statements thematically and rated statements in terms of importance and challenge. Sorting and rating data were analyzed using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis. The analysis yielded six “clusters” reflecting critical elements in building and sustaining a collaborative. Three elements, build trust and respect, do business differently and have...

    Collaboration among employment service providers has been suggested as one strategy for enhancing outcomes for people with disabilities. Yet, little research exists on the process of collaboration building or factors that contribute to effective collaboration among employment providers. We engaged partners of five Regional Employment Collaboratives (RECs) in Massachusetts to identify the critical elements needed to build and sustain an employment collaborative. We used concept mapping, a mixed-method approach that included brainstorming sessions during which REC partners generated statements in response to the research question – what does it take to build and sustain an employment collaborative? Partners sorted statements thematically and rated statements in terms of importance and challenge. Sorting and rating data were analyzed using multidimensional scaling and hierarchical cluster analysis. The analysis yielded six “clusters” reflecting critical elements in building and sustaining a collaborative. Three elements, build trust and respect, do business differently and have effective structures and processes, are consistent with the literature on general collaborative building. The other three elements, address employer needs, engage job developers, and innovate strategically, reflect activities specific to an employment-focused collaborative. Collaboration is a complex and time-consuming undertaking, but holds promise as a way to enhance employment outcomes for people with disabilities. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Gettens, John; Henry, Alexis D.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    To address the unmet need for employment-related health care services among persons with disabilities, an alternative and potentially viable policy solution is the development of a new type of subsidized coverage to 'wrap-around' the new ACA coverage or other private and public coverage. Additional information on the employment-related health care needs of persons with disabilities is needed to inform the potential development of wrap-around plans. In this study, we conducted focus groups with employed and potentially employed persons with disabilities in Massachusetts to identify and describe the types of employment support needs these individuals experience and to inform the development of a future research to quantify the employment support needs. (Author abstract)

    To address the unmet need for employment-related health care services among persons with disabilities, an alternative and potentially viable policy solution is the development of a new type of subsidized coverage to 'wrap-around' the new ACA coverage or other private and public coverage. Additional information on the employment-related health care needs of persons with disabilities is needed to inform the potential development of wrap-around plans. In this study, we conducted focus groups with employed and potentially employed persons with disabilities in Massachusetts to identify and describe the types of employment support needs these individuals experience and to inform the development of a future research to quantify the employment support needs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Massachusetts Housing and Shelter Alliance
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    As a result of mounting evidence from around the country that housing first is cost effective and decreases the incidence of chronic homelessness, the Massachusetts Legislature passed line-item 4406-3010 in the FY07 state budget to fund a statewide pilot housing first program for 130 chronically homeless individuals. The state allocated $600,000 to MHSA through the Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) to operate the program, known as Home and Healthy for Good (HHG). This resource is to be used to fund a portion of the service or housing components for program participants, with the expectation that federal or other state resources would be leveraged to finance additional needed service or facilities funds. (Author introduction)

    As a result of mounting evidence from around the country that housing first is cost effective and decreases the incidence of chronic homelessness, the Massachusetts Legislature passed line-item 4406-3010 in the FY07 state budget to fund a statewide pilot housing first program for 130 chronically homeless individuals. The state allocated $600,000 to MHSA through the Department of Transitional Assistance (DTA) to operate the program, known as Home and Healthy for Good (HHG). This resource is to be used to fund a portion of the service or housing components for program participants, with the expectation that federal or other state resources would be leveraged to finance additional needed service or facilities funds. (Author introduction)

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