Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Lee, Joanne; Needels, Karen; Nicholson, Walter
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This is a study of short- and medium-term adjustments that recipients of unemployment insurance (UI) make after a job loss in two regions in California. The study uses data from a two-wave longitudinal survey and UI administrative records to focus on such issues as how recipients’ job search strategies change over time, the role of UI benefits and other strategies unemployed workers use to cope with financial hardships, and UI recipients’ satisfaction with the program. (Author abstract)

    This is a study of short- and medium-term adjustments that recipients of unemployment insurance (UI) make after a job loss in two regions in California. The study uses data from a two-wave longitudinal survey and UI administrative records to focus on such issues as how recipients’ job search strategies change over time, the role of UI benefits and other strategies unemployed workers use to cope with financial hardships, and UI recipients’ satisfaction with the program. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Weigensberg, Elizabeth; Needels, Karen; Gould-Werth, Alix; Patnaik, Ankita; Lee, Joanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training. Researchers examined states’ motivation for establishing SEA programs, states’ experiences with implementing a program, and outcomes of SEA participants and their businesses. (Author abstract)

    This report for the Department of Labor examines Self-Employment Assistance (SEA) programs, which help qualifying unemployment insurance recipients set up a business in lieu of seeking a new job. In addition to providing a weekly self-employment allowance, SEA programs typically partnered with other organizations to provide participants with important business development supports, including counseling, mentoring, or training. Researchers examined states’ motivation for establishing SEA programs, states’ experiences with implementing a program, and outcomes of SEA participants and their businesses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Duane, Marina; La Vigne, Nancy G.; Reimal, Emily; Lynch, Mathew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Criminal background checks continue to be a routine practice among many employers in the United States. According to a recent survey, almost 60 percent of employers screen job applicants for their criminal histories. Despite their prevalence, criminal background checks often generate flawed or incomplete reports, with some reports failing to include conviction information. Such flaws may undermine the value of the screenings to employers and prevent suitable candidates who pose no additional risk to the public from securing a job. This report examines criminal background checks as a significant collateral consequence for justice-involved people and explores the importance of employment to reducing recidivism. (Author abstract)

    Criminal background checks continue to be a routine practice among many employers in the United States. According to a recent survey, almost 60 percent of employers screen job applicants for their criminal histories. Despite their prevalence, criminal background checks often generate flawed or incomplete reports, with some reports failing to include conviction information. Such flaws may undermine the value of the screenings to employers and prevent suitable candidates who pose no additional risk to the public from securing a job. This report examines criminal background checks as a significant collateral consequence for justice-involved people and explores the importance of employment to reducing recidivism. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cavadel, Elizabeth W.; Kauff, Jacqueline F. ; Anderson, Mary Anne ; McConnell, Sheena M.; Derr, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that...

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that have been successful in other contexts. In addition, the report provides examples of employment programs that have incorporated interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment and discusses the importance and challenges of measuring the success of such interventions. (Author introduction)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1935 to 2017

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations