Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Tsethlikai, M.; Murray, D.W.; Meyer, A.M.; Sparrow, J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The words that comprise “self-regulation” (e.g., ‘self’ and ‘regulation’) may be problematic for many Native communities that emphasize community and learning through observing, internalizing, and doing.  Self-regulation may still be relevant for Native communities because self-regulation occurs in relationships, can be developed through a range of different ways of learning, and can serve the well-being of whole communities. (Author abstract)

     

    The words that comprise “self-regulation” (e.g., ‘self’ and ‘regulation’) may be problematic for many Native communities that emphasize community and learning through observing, internalizing, and doing.  Self-regulation may still be relevant for Native communities because self-regulation occurs in relationships, can be developed through a range of different ways of learning, and can serve the well-being of whole communities. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Cox, Karen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In this message I will focus on toxic stress in children. What is toxic stress and why does it matter? First, toxic stress is the result of exposure to Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs). These events include physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, emotional neglect, intimate partner violence, mother treated violently, substance misuse within the household, potential separation or divorce, mental illness within the household, and incarcerated household member. And there is a dose response. The higher the number of ACEs, the higher the likelihood a child will experience significant episodes of toxic stress. This exposure to toxic stress has powerful and lifelong effects on physical and mental health. Revealed in a seminal study in 1998, those who had four or more ACEs were at increased risk for alcoholism, drug abuse, suicide attempt, smoking, more than 50 sexual partners, depression, heart disease, obesity, and liver disease. We now know that prolonged exposure to toxic stress actually changes the brain architecture. These changes can impact higher level...

    In this message I will focus on toxic stress in children. What is toxic stress and why does it matter? First, toxic stress is the result of exposure to Adverse Childhood Events (ACEs). These events include physical abuse, sexual abuse, emotional abuse, physical neglect, emotional neglect, intimate partner violence, mother treated violently, substance misuse within the household, potential separation or divorce, mental illness within the household, and incarcerated household member. And there is a dose response. The higher the number of ACEs, the higher the likelihood a child will experience significant episodes of toxic stress. This exposure to toxic stress has powerful and lifelong effects on physical and mental health. Revealed in a seminal study in 1998, those who had four or more ACEs were at increased risk for alcoholism, drug abuse, suicide attempt, smoking, more than 50 sexual partners, depression, heart disease, obesity, and liver disease. We now know that prolonged exposure to toxic stress actually changes the brain architecture. These changes can impact higher level functioning and decrease decision-making capacity. Framing this as the biologic impact of diversity helps to shift the conversation away from blaming individuals for making bad choices toward implementing system level changes that decrease exposure to toxic stress. (Author introduction excerpt)

     

  • Individual Author: Shinn, Marybeth; Gubits, Daniel ; Dunton, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

    This brief builds on previous research by describing the behavioral health problems reported by 2,020 parents—including some fathers—at the outset of a shelter stay with their children and the association of these problems with parents’ prior experiences. For the purposes of this brief, behavioral health includes psychological distress, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The brief then looks at changes in the parents’ behavioral health problems over the next 37 months and how those changes were related to housing stability following the episode of homelessness. (...

    The Homeless Families Research Briefs project, conducted by Abt Associates, is producing a series of research briefs on issues related to the well-being and economic self-sufficiency of families and children experiencing homelessness. Using data collected from the Department of Housing and Urban Development’s (HUD) Family Options Study, these briefs build on the data and analysis already being conducted for HUD to answer additional questions of interest to HHS. 

    This brief builds on previous research by describing the behavioral health problems reported by 2,020 parents—including some fathers—at the outset of a shelter stay with their children and the association of these problems with parents’ prior experiences. For the purposes of this brief, behavioral health includes psychological distress, alcohol dependence, drug abuse, and symptoms of post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD).The brief then looks at changes in the parents’ behavioral health problems over the next 37 months and how those changes were related to housing stability following the episode of homelessness. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    This set of selections focuses on trauma, youth, and self-sufficiency. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.
    See more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/ssrc-selections-executive-functioning

    This set of selections focuses on trauma, youth, and self-sufficiency. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.
    See more at:https://www.opressrc.org/content/ssrc-selections-executive-functioning

  • Individual Author: Wise, Julia; Hauke, Christi; Campbell, Tara
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses the importance of a two-generation community action approach that addresses the needs of both children and parents.

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses the importance of a two-generation community action approach that addresses the needs of both children and parents.

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1998 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations