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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Guo, Baorong; Huang, Jin; Porterfield, Shirley L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Young adults face enormous economic, social and psychological challenges when they transition into adulthood. This transition can be especially overwhelming and daunting for young adults with disabilities. Among the challenges young adults with disabilities are faced with are greater risk of low food security and barriers to healthcare. This study examines how the transition to adulthood may affect food security, health, and access to healthcare for youth with disabilities, and estimates the effects that SNAP has on this group in those turbulent years.

    The study used five years of data (2011-2015) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). We combined the public and restricted NHIS data with the state SNAP policy variables. The sample included low-income individuals ages 13-25 (and their families) to reflect the life stage from pre-transition, to transition, and then to post-transition. Analyses were conducted at the Census Research Data Center in Columbia, MO. A difference-in-difference (DID) approach in linear models was applied to compare individuals with and...

    Young adults face enormous economic, social and psychological challenges when they transition into adulthood. This transition can be especially overwhelming and daunting for young adults with disabilities. Among the challenges young adults with disabilities are faced with are greater risk of low food security and barriers to healthcare. This study examines how the transition to adulthood may affect food security, health, and access to healthcare for youth with disabilities, and estimates the effects that SNAP has on this group in those turbulent years.

    The study used five years of data (2011-2015) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). We combined the public and restricted NHIS data with the state SNAP policy variables. The sample included low-income individuals ages 13-25 (and their families) to reflect the life stage from pre-transition, to transition, and then to post-transition. Analyses were conducted at the Census Research Data Center in Columbia, MO. A difference-in-difference (DID) approach in linear models was applied to compare individuals with and without disabilities regarding changes in food security status and their health-related outcomes in the transition to adulthood. State SNAP policy variables were used as exogenous instruments to estimate the effects of SNAP participation on food security and health/healthcare use for youth and young adults with disabilities in the models of instrumental variables.

    The study’s limitations are closely examined with a focus on the constraints that we had in the DID analysis and the IV analysis. We also suggested directions for future research. Since food security likely has a profound impact on the long-term development, economic independence, and self-sufficiency, we discussed a few policy strategies that may help individuals with disabilities in their transition to adulthood. These include special outreach services to improve SNAP accessibility, an embedded alert system that serves to bring awareness of a SNAP participant’s upcoming transition to adulthood, incorporation of nutrition assistance in transition planning for youth, and better coordination of multiple public programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Medicaid and CHIP Payment and Access Commission
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

     

    Using data combined from the 2013–2015 National Health Interview Surveys, this brief examines characteristics of individuals with Medicaid coverage—children and adults—in rural areas, as well as their access to care and use of services, comparing their experience to their privately insured and uninsured counterparts. We also compare access and use between Medicaid beneficiaries in urban and rural areas, and by disability. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Forber-Pratt, Anjali J.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    The present study examined the views of students with varying physical disabilities on disability culture in a post-Americans with Disability Act society. Qualitative, participatory research methods were used to observe approximately 30 disabled students and conduct in-depth interviews with four disabled students. The main objective was initially to answer the following question: Do disabled students recognize an identifiable disability culture at that particular university, and if so, what does it look like? While the sheer presence of disabled students does not automatically equate to a robust disability culture, it became apparent that there was a disability culture at this site, and therefore the research question was refined to: What are the features of disability culture according to this population? The participants were all students at an institute of higher education in the Midwestern United States. The researcher self-identifies as having a disability. Using in vivo coding for analysis to preserve the voices of the participants themselves, the results indicated that...

    The present study examined the views of students with varying physical disabilities on disability culture in a post-Americans with Disability Act society. Qualitative, participatory research methods were used to observe approximately 30 disabled students and conduct in-depth interviews with four disabled students. The main objective was initially to answer the following question: Do disabled students recognize an identifiable disability culture at that particular university, and if so, what does it look like? While the sheer presence of disabled students does not automatically equate to a robust disability culture, it became apparent that there was a disability culture at this site, and therefore the research question was refined to: What are the features of disability culture according to this population? The participants were all students at an institute of higher education in the Midwestern United States. The researcher self-identifies as having a disability. Using in vivo coding for analysis to preserve the voices of the participants themselves, the results indicated that there was a disability culture and the key values defining this culture included independence, social justice, and giving back to others. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hoffman, Denise; Hemmeter, Jeffrey; Bailey, Michelle S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients are presumed eligible for vocational rehabilitation services and youth who receive SSI may access those services as they prepare for the transition from school to work. Vocational rehabilitation (VR) is intended to help youth with disabilities become employed and maintain employment and thereby lessen their reliance on disability benefits in adulthood. In passing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in 2014, policymakers sought to expand VR and complementary services for transition-age youth with disabilities, in part to improve their employment outcomes in adulthood and decrease their reliance on benefits. In this brief, we document the rates of participation in VR by youth SSI recipients, describe the characteristics of youth who receive VR, and report on the association between youth’s VR participation and their employment and benefit outcomes in adulthood. Our findings indicate that, in 2001, 13 percent of youth SSI recipients ages 14 to 17 reported receiving VR services. Thirteen years later, when these individuals were...

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients are presumed eligible for vocational rehabilitation services and youth who receive SSI may access those services as they prepare for the transition from school to work. Vocational rehabilitation (VR) is intended to help youth with disabilities become employed and maintain employment and thereby lessen their reliance on disability benefits in adulthood. In passing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in 2014, policymakers sought to expand VR and complementary services for transition-age youth with disabilities, in part to improve their employment outcomes in adulthood and decrease their reliance on benefits. In this brief, we document the rates of participation in VR by youth SSI recipients, describe the characteristics of youth who receive VR, and report on the association between youth’s VR participation and their employment and benefit outcomes in adulthood. Our findings indicate that, in 2001, 13 percent of youth SSI recipients ages 14 to 17 reported receiving VR services. Thirteen years later, when these individuals were ages 27 to 30, a higher proportion had substantial earnings and a lower proportion received SSI compared with other SSI recipients who did not receive VR services, holding observable characteristics constant. We cannot determine the extent to which the associations between VR and these adult outcomes reflect unobserved differences between youth who participate in VR and those who do not versus the effect of VR services on outcomes. Nonetheless, the promising associations between VR and long-term adult outcomes highlight the potential benefits of providing early support to transition-age youth. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Salisbury, Sarah
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the important role that transportation plays, the goals of achieving full community integration, and the challenges with transportation in the current environment.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the important role that transportation plays, the goals of achieving full community integration, and the challenges with transportation in the current environment.

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