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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Paris, Ruth; Sommer, Amy; Marron, Beth
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2018

    In the context of increasing rates of opioid misuse, particularly by women of childbearing age with histories of trauma, this chapter describes the background, evidence base, conceptual framework, and practice parameters for an attachment-based evidence-informed dyadic intervention utilizing the principles of child-parent psychotherapy with mothers and infants impacted by substance use disorders (SUDs). A strong focus of this chapter is to elaborate on the emotional needs of mothers in early recovery as they enter into the parenting role and on the needs of substance-exposed newborns and their role in fragile infant-parent dyads. A case is presented at the end of the chapter so that readers are better able to conceptualize this novel application of dyadic psychotherapy. (Author abstract)

    In the context of increasing rates of opioid misuse, particularly by women of childbearing age with histories of trauma, this chapter describes the background, evidence base, conceptual framework, and practice parameters for an attachment-based evidence-informed dyadic intervention utilizing the principles of child-parent psychotherapy with mothers and infants impacted by substance use disorders (SUDs). A strong focus of this chapter is to elaborate on the emotional needs of mothers in early recovery as they enter into the parenting role and on the needs of substance-exposed newborns and their role in fragile infant-parent dyads. A case is presented at the end of the chapter so that readers are better able to conceptualize this novel application of dyadic psychotherapy. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spillman, Brenda C.; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Mallik-Kane, Kamala; Hayes, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Van Buren, John
    Reference Type: Thesis
    Year: 2014

    Urban gardening has become a very popular trend in the last few years in both affluent neighborhoods as a form of relaxation and in impoverished areas as a form of hunger relief. In impoverished areas, urban gardens are usually exclusively advertised as a solution to limited food access; however, there is a naive belief that these gardens are effective forms of mass food production. Presently, these gardens are not productive enough to globally effect food production and the environment. However, to the communities surrounding the gardens, the effects are immense. Urban gardens are cheap and effective solutions for many of the problems associated with poverty and food deserts. Some of the issues I will address are: obesity, education, social interactions, income supplementation, health issues, dangerous neighborhoods, and refugee assimilation.

    The overall approach will be based on public health and the health of the community. I will address the physical and psychological effects of urban gardens, but I will also touch upon the effects on the ecology and psychology of the...

    Urban gardening has become a very popular trend in the last few years in both affluent neighborhoods as a form of relaxation and in impoverished areas as a form of hunger relief. In impoverished areas, urban gardens are usually exclusively advertised as a solution to limited food access; however, there is a naive belief that these gardens are effective forms of mass food production. Presently, these gardens are not productive enough to globally effect food production and the environment. However, to the communities surrounding the gardens, the effects are immense. Urban gardens are cheap and effective solutions for many of the problems associated with poverty and food deserts. Some of the issues I will address are: obesity, education, social interactions, income supplementation, health issues, dangerous neighborhoods, and refugee assimilation.

    The overall approach will be based on public health and the health of the community. I will address the physical and psychological effects of urban gardens, but I will also touch upon the effects on the ecology and psychology of the neighborhood, urban and suburban planning and its accompanying laws, environmental psychology, and environmental education. I will initially detail some of the consequences associated with living in an impoverished area. I will use the various research and case studies performed, as well as some of my own observations working in these areas. I will then compile the individual research of various solutions to food deserts and assemble them into an analysis of the overall beneficial effects of urban gardens. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dorn, Stan; Minton, Sarah; Huber, Erika
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    States and non-profit organizations have used three approaches to successfully integrate enrollment and retention of health and human services programs: 1. Streamlining one program's eligibility determination based on data from other programs. This approach has helped uninsured children receive and retain health coverage, helped low-income seniors obtain SNAP, and produced state administrative savings. 2. Coordinated administration of multiple programs. Administrative savings resulted when multiple programs integrated their systems for case records, data matching, eligibility rules engines, on-line applications, and benefit payment. 3. Coordinating enrollment. Community colleges exemplify sites for enrolling consumers into multiple health and human services at once. (author abstract)

    States and non-profit organizations have used three approaches to successfully integrate enrollment and retention of health and human services programs: 1. Streamlining one program's eligibility determination based on data from other programs. This approach has helped uninsured children receive and retain health coverage, helped low-income seniors obtain SNAP, and produced state administrative savings. 2. Coordinated administration of multiple programs. Administrative savings resulted when multiple programs integrated their systems for case records, data matching, eligibility rules engines, on-line applications, and benefit payment. 3. Coordinating enrollment. Community colleges exemplify sites for enrolling consumers into multiple health and human services at once. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Feinberg, Emily; Trejo, Bricia; Sullivan, Brianna; Ferreira-Cesar Suarez, Zhandra
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    This article describes the collaboration that supported the development and implementation of the nation’s first contemporary program to use housing as a strategy to promote healthy birth outcomes. Using case study methodology, we examine how two agencies with distinctly different missions, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), were able to successfully collaborate and develop the program Healthy Start in Housing (HSiH) in 2011. HSiH provides priority access to housing in the city’s traditional family housing developments to homeless and housing insecure pregnant women who have existing medical risks associated with poor birth outcomes. Data were collected from eight key stakeholder interviews, two focus groups with HSiH staff, program documents, and archival records. The contextual factors, chronology of the development of HSiH, and lessons learned were identified from an analysis of the case. We found that recognizing the need for interdependence, having a history of previous interagency collaboration, and clear and mutually shared...

    This article describes the collaboration that supported the development and implementation of the nation’s first contemporary program to use housing as a strategy to promote healthy birth outcomes. Using case study methodology, we examine how two agencies with distinctly different missions, the Boston Housing Authority (BHA) and the Boston Public Health Commission (BPHC), were able to successfully collaborate and develop the program Healthy Start in Housing (HSiH) in 2011. HSiH provides priority access to housing in the city’s traditional family housing developments to homeless and housing insecure pregnant women who have existing medical risks associated with poor birth outcomes. Data were collected from eight key stakeholder interviews, two focus groups with HSiH staff, program documents, and archival records. The contextual factors, chronology of the development of HSiH, and lessons learned were identified from an analysis of the case. We found that recognizing the need for interdependence, having a history of previous interagency collaboration, and clear and mutually shared goals facilitated the development of the HSiH collaboration. The challenges to cross-agency collaboration between the BHA and BPHC were minor but did exist, including difficulty in assessing BHA eligibility at program entry. This case study provides insights to the key components of a unique collaboration that aims to promote healthy birth outcomes and sets the stage for future research to assess the health effects of program participation. (author abstract)

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