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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Guo, Baorong; Huang, Jin; Porterfield, Shirley L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Young adults face enormous economic, social and psychological challenges when they transition into adulthood. This transition can be especially overwhelming and daunting for young adults with disabilities. Among the challenges young adults with disabilities are faced with are greater risk of low food security and barriers to healthcare. This study examines how the transition to adulthood may affect food security, health, and access to healthcare for youth with disabilities, and estimates the effects that SNAP has on this group in those turbulent years.

    The study used five years of data (2011-2015) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). We combined the public and restricted NHIS data with the state SNAP policy variables. The sample included low-income individuals ages 13-25 (and their families) to reflect the life stage from pre-transition, to transition, and then to post-transition. Analyses were conducted at the Census Research Data Center in Columbia, MO. A difference-in-difference (DID) approach in linear models was applied to compare individuals with and...

    Young adults face enormous economic, social and psychological challenges when they transition into adulthood. This transition can be especially overwhelming and daunting for young adults with disabilities. Among the challenges young adults with disabilities are faced with are greater risk of low food security and barriers to healthcare. This study examines how the transition to adulthood may affect food security, health, and access to healthcare for youth with disabilities, and estimates the effects that SNAP has on this group in those turbulent years.

    The study used five years of data (2011-2015) from the National Health Interview Survey (NHIS). We combined the public and restricted NHIS data with the state SNAP policy variables. The sample included low-income individuals ages 13-25 (and their families) to reflect the life stage from pre-transition, to transition, and then to post-transition. Analyses were conducted at the Census Research Data Center in Columbia, MO. A difference-in-difference (DID) approach in linear models was applied to compare individuals with and without disabilities regarding changes in food security status and their health-related outcomes in the transition to adulthood. State SNAP policy variables were used as exogenous instruments to estimate the effects of SNAP participation on food security and health/healthcare use for youth and young adults with disabilities in the models of instrumental variables.

    The study’s limitations are closely examined with a focus on the constraints that we had in the DID analysis and the IV analysis. We also suggested directions for future research. Since food security likely has a profound impact on the long-term development, economic independence, and self-sufficiency, we discussed a few policy strategies that may help individuals with disabilities in their transition to adulthood. These include special outreach services to improve SNAP accessibility, an embedded alert system that serves to bring awareness of a SNAP participant’s upcoming transition to adulthood, incorporation of nutrition assistance in transition planning for youth, and better coordination of multiple public programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Germain, Justin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report identifies the state of current research on the prevalence of opioid use disorder and treatment services among Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participants and the TANF-eligible population. Additional emphasis is provided on how opioid use disorder negatively affects work-readiness and employment attainment. Funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families, this project aims to improve economic well-being and increase TANF agencies’ knowledge base. This report is based on a literature review of opioid use disorder treatment strategies and information on the effects of opioids in the TANF, TANF-eligible, and low-income populations.

    Opioid use disorder in the United States has skyrocketed since 2010. Opioids contributed to 42,249 American overdose deaths in 2016, and this rate continues to swell. Little contemporary research has been conducted on the effects of this surge on the TANF population. Existing research about the opioid crisis primarily focuses on its effects on the general population,...

    This report identifies the state of current research on the prevalence of opioid use disorder and treatment services among Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) participants and the TANF-eligible population. Additional emphasis is provided on how opioid use disorder negatively affects work-readiness and employment attainment. Funded by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children and Families, this project aims to improve economic well-being and increase TANF agencies’ knowledge base. This report is based on a literature review of opioid use disorder treatment strategies and information on the effects of opioids in the TANF, TANF-eligible, and low-income populations.

    Opioid use disorder in the United States has skyrocketed since 2010. Opioids contributed to 42,249 American overdose deaths in 2016, and this rate continues to swell. Little contemporary research has been conducted on the effects of this surge on the TANF population. Existing research about the opioid crisis primarily focuses on its effects on the general population, while TANF-centered studies almost exclusively examine general substance use disorder. Available research suggests that opioid and substance use disorders are significant barriers to employment for low-income individuals. Treatment and prevention strategies that consider substance use disorders as one of many social, economic, and psychological barriers to employability tend to be more effective in promoting recovery and integration within the labor market. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Stephens, Samuel A.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List identifies resources in the Research Connections collection published in 2010 or later that examine access to and utilization of early care and education by children in families experiencing homelessness, early childhood programs and practices that are designed to address their specific developmental needs, and policy options to increase access to high quality care and education for this particularly vulnerable group of young children. (Author introduction)

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List identifies resources in the Research Connections collection published in 2010 or later that examine access to and utilization of early care and education by children in families experiencing homelessness, early childhood programs and practices that are designed to address their specific developmental needs, and policy options to increase access to high quality care and education for this particularly vulnerable group of young children. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Martin, Brian; Wilkerson, Amanda H.; Patterson, Gilbert; Nahar, Vinayak K.; Sharma, Manoj
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Oral health pertains to the well-being of the oral cavity and pharynx. The most common afflictions are dental caries and periodontal disease, such as gingivitis, while less common but more serious conditions include oral and pharyngeal cancers. Oral health is critical to overall health, as oral disease has been found to be linked to diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and low birth-weight for babies. Unfortunately, despite the importance of oral health to overall health status, oral health is often overlooked by the public. One study in Appalachia found that residents listed it as their lowest health concern. (Author introduction)

    Oral health pertains to the well-being of the oral cavity and pharynx. The most common afflictions are dental caries and periodontal disease, such as gingivitis, while less common but more serious conditions include oral and pharyngeal cancers. Oral health is critical to overall health, as oral disease has been found to be linked to diabetes, heart disease, stroke, and low birth-weight for babies. Unfortunately, despite the importance of oral health to overall health status, oral health is often overlooked by the public. One study in Appalachia found that residents listed it as their lowest health concern. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Since the mid-1960s, the rate of prime-age American men working or actively looking for work has steadily declined. During this time period, marriage rates have also fallen precipitously, particularly among less-educated groups. A growing body of research has also begun to document a rise in poor health and premature mortality among these populations. These demographic and health-related shifts both reflect and contribute to poverty and economic inequality. Reversing these trends has the potential to improve labor force participation and social well-being as well as boost economic growth. This brief synthesizes current research on work and well-being among less-educated men, many of whom are low-income or poor. It highlights the recent research on labor market characteristics, barriers to work, and family and social ties, and identifies knowledge gaps about why these men's labor force participation has fallen and how social policy can address this trend. (Author abstract)

    Since the mid-1960s, the rate of prime-age American men working or actively looking for work has steadily declined. During this time period, marriage rates have also fallen precipitously, particularly among less-educated groups. A growing body of research has also begun to document a rise in poor health and premature mortality among these populations. These demographic and health-related shifts both reflect and contribute to poverty and economic inequality. Reversing these trends has the potential to improve labor force participation and social well-being as well as boost economic growth. This brief synthesizes current research on work and well-being among less-educated men, many of whom are low-income or poor. It highlights the recent research on labor market characteristics, barriers to work, and family and social ties, and identifies knowledge gaps about why these men's labor force participation has fallen and how social policy can address this trend. (Author abstract)

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