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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Woolf, Steven H.; Aron, Laudan
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2018

    White Americans are dying at higher rates from drugs, alcohol, and suicides. And the sharpest increases are happening in rural counties, often in regions with long-standing social and economic challenges. The reasons behind these increases are unclear and complex. The opioid epidemic plays a role but is just one part of a larger public health crisis. Life expectancy in the US as a whole has fallen for the second year in a row, and the nation’s health relative to other countries has been declining for decades. Some combination of factors in American life must explain why the rise in mortality is greatest among white, middle-aged adults and certain rural communities. Possibilities include the collapse of industries and the local economies they supported, greater social isolation, economic hardship, and distress among white workers over losing the security their parents’ generation once enjoyed. Also, over the past 30 years, income inequality and other social divides have widened, middle-class incomes have stagnated, and poverty rates have exceeded those of most rich countries.  ...

    White Americans are dying at higher rates from drugs, alcohol, and suicides. And the sharpest increases are happening in rural counties, often in regions with long-standing social and economic challenges. The reasons behind these increases are unclear and complex. The opioid epidemic plays a role but is just one part of a larger public health crisis. Life expectancy in the US as a whole has fallen for the second year in a row, and the nation’s health relative to other countries has been declining for decades. Some combination of factors in American life must explain why the rise in mortality is greatest among white, middle-aged adults and certain rural communities. Possibilities include the collapse of industries and the local economies they supported, greater social isolation, economic hardship, and distress among white workers over losing the security their parents’ generation once enjoyed. Also, over the past 30 years, income inequality and other social divides have widened, middle-class incomes have stagnated, and poverty rates have exceeded those of most rich countries.  Recent legislation and regulations, however, may prolong or intensify the economic burden on the middle class and weaken access to health care and safety net programs. The consequences of these choices are dire—not only more deaths and illness, but also escalating health care costs, a sicker workforce, and a less competitive economy. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Rohacek, Monica; Isaacs, Julia
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs. The report also discusses the implications of these findings for implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Fund. (Author abstract)

    Child care subsidies are critical for the well-being of low-income families, including parents’ economic success and children’s development. To inform state efforts to simplify access to child care subsidies and improve service delivery, this report highlights steps taken and lessons learned by five states that participated in the Work Support Strategies initiative between 2012 and 2015. These states worked to improve child care subsidy access and retention, efficiency of service delivery, quality of client service, and alignment with other benefit programs. The report also discusses the implications of these findings for implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Fund. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Helms, Veronica E.; Steffen, Barry L.; Rudd, Elizabeth C.; Sperling, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Wu, Lawrence L.; Mark, Nicholas D. E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Could we combat poverty by reducing the number of unintended and nonmarital births? This article proposes a federal policy that would provide all women with information about, and free access to, a range of contraceptive services, including long-acting reversible contraceptives; reviews what it is that we do and do not know; discusses several dynamic selection mechanisms by which this policy could lead to poverty reductions; stresses the need for longitudinal randomized intent-to-treat pilots that would provide causal evidence on whether this policy would in fact reduce poverty; and provides rough estimates of take-up, costs, and benefits were such a policy to substantially increase the use of highly effective contraceptive methods. (Author abstract)

    Could we combat poverty by reducing the number of unintended and nonmarital births? This article proposes a federal policy that would provide all women with information about, and free access to, a range of contraceptive services, including long-acting reversible contraceptives; reviews what it is that we do and do not know; discusses several dynamic selection mechanisms by which this policy could lead to poverty reductions; stresses the need for longitudinal randomized intent-to-treat pilots that would provide causal evidence on whether this policy would in fact reduce poverty; and provides rough estimates of take-up, costs, and benefits were such a policy to substantially increase the use of highly effective contraceptive methods. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hughes, Michelle; Tucker, Whitney
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Research demonstrates the correlation between childhood adversities linked to poverty and negative outcomes in adulthood, indicating that poverty may itself be considered an adverse childhood experience. Because child poverty is a result of family economic circumstance, policy investments promoting family financial health are imperative to protect child well-being and North Carolina's future prosperity. (Author abstract)

     

    Research demonstrates the correlation between childhood adversities linked to poverty and negative outcomes in adulthood, indicating that poverty may itself be considered an adverse childhood experience. Because child poverty is a result of family economic circumstance, policy investments promoting family financial health are imperative to protect child well-being and North Carolina's future prosperity. (Author abstract)

     

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