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  • Individual Author: Patel, Falguni
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop describes a study investigating the impact of a trauma-informed service that matches savings for low-income TANF receipents and offers programming that includes topics such as financial goal-setting.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop describes a study investigating the impact of a trauma-informed service that matches savings for low-income TANF receipents and offers programming that includes topics such as financial goal-setting.

  • Individual Author: Booshehri, Layla G.; Dugan, Jerome; Patel, Falguni; Bloom, Sandra; Chilton, Mariana
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has limited success in building self-sufficiency, and rarely addresses exposure to trauma as a barrier to employment. The objective of the Building Wealth and Health Network randomized controlled trial was to test effectiveness of financial empowerment combined with trauma-informed peer support against standard TANF programming. Through the method of single-blind randomization we assigned 103 caregivers of children under age six into three groups: control (standard TANF programming), partial (28-weeks financial education), and full (same as partial with simultaneous 28-weeks of trauma-informed peer support). Participants completed baseline and follow-up surveys every 3 months over 15 months. Group response rates were equivalent throughout. With mixed effects analysis we compared post-program outcomes at months 9, 12, and 15 to baseline. We modeled the impact of amount of participation in group classes on participant outcomes. Despite high exposure to trauma and adversity results demonstrate that, compared to the other groups,...

    Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) has limited success in building self-sufficiency, and rarely addresses exposure to trauma as a barrier to employment. The objective of the Building Wealth and Health Network randomized controlled trial was to test effectiveness of financial empowerment combined with trauma-informed peer support against standard TANF programming. Through the method of single-blind randomization we assigned 103 caregivers of children under age six into three groups: control (standard TANF programming), partial (28-weeks financial education), and full (same as partial with simultaneous 28-weeks of trauma-informed peer support). Participants completed baseline and follow-up surveys every 3 months over 15 months. Group response rates were equivalent throughout. With mixed effects analysis we compared post-program outcomes at months 9, 12, and 15 to baseline. We modeled the impact of amount of participation in group classes on participant outcomes. Despite high exposure to trauma and adversity results demonstrate that, compared to the other groups, caregivers in the full intervention reported improved self-efficacy and depressive symptoms, and reduced economic hardship. Unlike the intervention groups, the control group reported increased developmental risk among their children. Although the control group showed higher levels of employment, the full intervention group reported greater earnings. The partial intervention group showed little to no differences compared with the control group. We conclude that financial empowerment education with trauma-informed peer support is more effective than standard TANF programming at improving behavioral health, reducing hardship, and increasing income. Policymakers may consider adapting TANF to include trauma-informed programming. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Boxmeyer, Caroline; Gilpin, Ansley; DeCaro, Jason; Lochman, John; Qu, Lixin; Mitchell, Qshequilla; Snead, Stacey
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    This paper examines whether Power PATH, an integrated classroom and parent social-emotional curriculum, can be successfully implemented in Head Start settings, and whether it leads to significant improvements in child school-readiness and family well-being. Power PATH combines the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (Preschool PATHS) social-emotional classroom curriculum for children (Domitrovich, Greenberg, Cortes, & Kusche, 1999) with the Coping Power parent program (Wells, Lochman & Lenhart, 2008). The curricula each have an existing evidence-base for improving social-emotional functioning in children (Bierman et al., 2008; 2012; Domitrovich & Greenberg, 2007; Morris et al., 2014) and parents (e.g., Lochman & Wells, 2003, 2004; Lochman et al., 2006), respectively. The coordinated parent-child curriculum is designed to: create positive, consistent home and classroom environments; improve child and parent emotional self-regulation and interpersonal skills; and increase natural social supports. While Power PATH does not directly target parent employment or...

    This paper examines whether Power PATH, an integrated classroom and parent social-emotional curriculum, can be successfully implemented in Head Start settings, and whether it leads to significant improvements in child school-readiness and family well-being. Power PATH combines the Promoting Alternative Thinking Strategies (Preschool PATHS) social-emotional classroom curriculum for children (Domitrovich, Greenberg, Cortes, & Kusche, 1999) with the Coping Power parent program (Wells, Lochman & Lenhart, 2008). The curricula each have an existing evidence-base for improving social-emotional functioning in children (Bierman et al., 2008; 2012; Domitrovich & Greenberg, 2007; Morris et al., 2014) and parents (e.g., Lochman & Wells, 2003, 2004; Lochman et al., 2006), respectively. The coordinated parent-child curriculum is designed to: create positive, consistent home and classroom environments; improve child and parent emotional self-regulation and interpersonal skills; and increase natural social supports. While Power PATH does not directly target parent employment or financial income, it is designed to enhance their social-emotional skills and resources, which are foundational to educational and financial attainment. The large, experimental study is being conducted in collaboration with a community action program that administers Head Start preschools in seven counties in Alabama. The study sample is predominantly Black/African American (75%) and from rural to semi-rural areas. Twenty-six classrooms across nine Head Start centers were randomly assigned (by center) to receive Power PATH or Head Start-as-usual. Initial pilot testing yielded evidence of strong, positive impacts. This paper will present findings from the first intervention cohort (n=117) in the following domains: implementation of Power PATH in Head Start preschools; program effects on children (cognitive and executive function skills, emotional and behavioral self-regulation, stress physiology) and parents/families (parental stress and mental health, emotional self-regulation, executive function, social support, educational and employment status, and financial well-being); and participant perceptions of Power PATH, including its sustainability in Head Start settings. Experimental impact findings will provide compelling evidence of whether Power PATH can serve as a valuable resource for improving low-income parent and child social-emotional functioning in an integrated way. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Pakulak, Eric; Bell, Theodore A.; Giuliano, Ryan; Gomsrud, Melissa; Karns, Christina; Klein, Scott; Longoria, Zayra; O'Neill, Lauren; Neville, Helen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2015

    ...Guided by evidence of the neuroplasticity of systems supporting stress regulation, selective attention, and self-regulation, as well as by evidence from successful parenting programs (e.g., Reid et al., 1999), we developed a two-generation intervention that targets attention and self-regulation in preschool children by engaging the broader context of parents and the home environment. The child component of the curriculum is delivered in the classroom, and the parent component is offered in eight weekly two-hour meetings midway through the school year. Child and parent training programs are integrated via an overarching emphasis on child attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and via explicit links in the parent program to child learning activities. We have shown that, relative to two comparison groups, parents in the program demonstrate reduced parenting stress, and children in the program display significant improvements in cognition, parent-reported child behaviors, and brain functions supporting selective attention (Neville et al., 2013).

    Our current...

    ...Guided by evidence of the neuroplasticity of systems supporting stress regulation, selective attention, and self-regulation, as well as by evidence from successful parenting programs (e.g., Reid et al., 1999), we developed a two-generation intervention that targets attention and self-regulation in preschool children by engaging the broader context of parents and the home environment. The child component of the curriculum is delivered in the classroom, and the parent component is offered in eight weekly two-hour meetings midway through the school year. Child and parent training programs are integrated via an overarching emphasis on child attention, self-regulation, and emotional regulation and via explicit links in the parent program to child learning activities. We have shown that, relative to two comparison groups, parents in the program demonstrate reduced parenting stress, and children in the program display significant improvements in cognition, parent-reported child behaviors, and brain functions supporting selective attention (Neville et al., 2013).

    Our current project builds on a ten-year program-research partnership with Head Start of Lane County, Oregon. As part of the study, children in 20 classrooms across seven sites are randomly assigned to receive either the two-generation intervention, Creating Connections (CC), or Head Start-as-usual, enabling us to test the hypothesis that children and parents receiving CC will show improvements in in stress physiology, brain functions for attention, and self-regulation. This paper describes preliminary findings based on the first cohort of CC participants (N = 48). We measure stress physiology and brain function for attention and self-regulation in both children and parents before and after implementation of the parent component, in addition to longer-term measures of broader outcomes. Because stress and self-regulation are related to multiple outcomes, we hypothesize that short-term changes in these systems will lead to broader, longer-term improvements in family well-being (e.g., Shonkoff, 2012). Results supporting this hypothesis would provide evidence that investments in two-generation interventions that target self-regulation in children and parents from lower SES backgrounds may produce benefits that extend beyond improvements in school readiness. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Vogel, Cheri A.; Xue, Yange; Moiduddin, Emily M.; Carlson, Barbara L.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2010

    Early Head Start is a two-generation program for low-income pregnant women, and families with infants or toddlers that is designed to enhance children’s development and health and to strengthen family and community partnerships. A rigorous evaluation, the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, was initiated the same time the program was authorized, following 3,001 children and families in 17 of the first programs funded. The children were randomly assigned either to the program group, or to the control group who were precluded from enrolling in Early Head Start, although they could receive other services in the community. The initial phase of the evaluation included an implementation study to document program services as well as an impact study, which followed children and their families until they were 3 years old with an ambitious measurement plan to assess the wide range of child and family outcomes that Early Head Start programs may influence. Two follow-up assessments have been conducted. Families were contacted in the prekindergarten year (when children were...

    Early Head Start is a two-generation program for low-income pregnant women, and families with infants or toddlers that is designed to enhance children’s development and health and to strengthen family and community partnerships. A rigorous evaluation, the Early Head Start Research and Evaluation Project, was initiated the same time the program was authorized, following 3,001 children and families in 17 of the first programs funded. The children were randomly assigned either to the program group, or to the control group who were precluded from enrolling in Early Head Start, although they could receive other services in the community. The initial phase of the evaluation included an implementation study to document program services as well as an impact study, which followed children and their families until they were 3 years old with an ambitious measurement plan to assess the wide range of child and family outcomes that Early Head Start programs may influence. Two follow-up assessments have been conducted. Families were contacted in the prekindergarten year (when children were about 5 years old), and this latest wave of follow-up occurred when children were in fifth grade, about 10 years of age. (author abstract)

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