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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wheaton, Laura; Lynch, Victoria; Johnson, Martha C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Katz, Michael
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the Work Support Strategies Initiative, an effort to improve families’ well-being by increasing enrollment in the full package of work supports. The Initiative also seeks to help states deliver benefits more effectively and efficiently and share lessons learned to inform state and federal policies.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the Work Support Strategies Initiative, an effort to improve families’ well-being by increasing enrollment in the full package of work supports. The Initiative also seeks to help states deliver benefits more effectively and efficiently and share lessons learned to inform state and federal policies.

  • Individual Author: Sparr, Mariel; Joraanstad, Alexandra; Atukpawu-Tipton, Grace; Miller, Nicole; Leis, Julie; Filene, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Rates of poor birth outcomes remain high in the United States. In 2015, 9.6 percent of U.S. infants were born preterm and 8.1 percent were born with low birth weights. To address poor birth outcomes in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) developed the Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns (Strong Start) initiative. The Strong Start initiative is studying enhanced prenatal care approaches aimed at reducing preterm births among Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) beneficiaries who are at high risk for poor birth outcomes. As part of the Strong Start initiative, CMS, in partnership with the Administration for Children and Families and the Health Resources and Services Administration, established the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation - Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start). MIHOPE-Strong Start is evaluating the effectiveness of evidence-based home visiting for improving birth outcomes, maternal and infant health, health care use, and prenatal care use among women enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP as compared to mothers...

    Rates of poor birth outcomes remain high in the United States. In 2015, 9.6 percent of U.S. infants were born preterm and 8.1 percent were born with low birth weights. To address poor birth outcomes in the United States, the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) developed the Strong Start for Mothers and Newborns (Strong Start) initiative. The Strong Start initiative is studying enhanced prenatal care approaches aimed at reducing preterm births among Medicaid and Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) beneficiaries who are at high risk for poor birth outcomes. As part of the Strong Start initiative, CMS, in partnership with the Administration for Children and Families and the Health Resources and Services Administration, established the Mother and Infant Home Visiting Program Evaluation - Strong Start (MIHOPE-Strong Start). MIHOPE-Strong Start is evaluating the effectiveness of evidence-based home visiting for improving birth outcomes, maternal and infant health, health care use, and prenatal care use among women enrolled in Medicaid or CHIP as compared to mothers who may receive other services available in the community. To better understand the larger service systems within which prenatal care and home visiting programs operate at the state level, MIHOPE-Strong Start conducted interviews with staff from state agencies and other non-governmental entities working to improve birth outcomes in the states participating in MIHOPE-Strong Start. This report presents the findings from this qualitative substudy, which provides a snapshot of the range of state efforts to promote prenatal health and improve birth outcomes, including home visiting. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hoynes, Hilary ; Bronchetti, Erin; Christensen, Garret
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The food stamp program (SNAP) is one of the most important elements of the social safety net and is the second largest anti-poverty program for children in the U.S. (only the EITC raises more children above poverty). The program varies little across states and over time, which creates challenges for quasi-experimental evaluation. Notably, SNAP benefit levels are fixed across 48 states; but local food prices vary widely, leading to substantial variation in the real value of SNAP benefits. In this study, we leverage time variation in the real value of the SNAP benefit across markets to examine the effects of SNAP on child health. We link panel data on regional food prices and the cost of the Thrifty Food Plan, as measured by the USDA’s Quarterly Food at Home Price Database, to restricted-access geo-located National Health Interview Survey data on samples of SNAP-recipient and SNAP-eligible children. We estimate the relationship between the real value of SNAP benefits (i.e., the ratio of the SNAP maximum benefit to the TFP price faced by a household) and children’s health and health...

    The food stamp program (SNAP) is one of the most important elements of the social safety net and is the second largest anti-poverty program for children in the U.S. (only the EITC raises more children above poverty). The program varies little across states and over time, which creates challenges for quasi-experimental evaluation. Notably, SNAP benefit levels are fixed across 48 states; but local food prices vary widely, leading to substantial variation in the real value of SNAP benefits. In this study, we leverage time variation in the real value of the SNAP benefit across markets to examine the effects of SNAP on child health. We link panel data on regional food prices and the cost of the Thrifty Food Plan, as measured by the USDA’s Quarterly Food at Home Price Database, to restricted-access geo-located National Health Interview Survey data on samples of SNAP-recipient and SNAP-eligible children. We estimate the relationship between the real value of SNAP benefits (i.e., the ratio of the SNAP maximum benefit to the TFP price faced by a household) and children’s health and health care utilization, in a fixed effects framework that controls for a number of individual-level and region characteristics, including non-food prices. Our findings indicate that children in market regions with a lower real value of SNAP benefits utilize significantly less health care, and may utilize emergency room care at increased rates. Lower real SNAP benefits also lead to an increase in school absences but we find no effect on reported health status. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Hahn, Heather; Isaacs, Julia; Wagner, Jennifer; Forster, Hilary
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) describes the Work Support Strategies (WSS) initiative and reviews outcomes and implementation experiences from the multistate evaluation. WSS is designed to streamline the delivery of work supports to eligible families.

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