Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author abstract)

    This report was also published as an Issue Brief at the Carsey Institute for Public Policy at the University of New Hampshire.

  • Individual Author: Turner, Margery Austin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Beginning with the settlement houses of the late 19th century, practitioners and policymakers have worked to tackle the challenges of poverty in place through an evolving set of strategies. Since then, federal, state, and local governments; philanthropy; charitable organizations; and research institutions have played important—often complementary—roles in designing, funding, and evaluating interventions. This memo traces that history. (Author abstract)

    Beginning with the settlement houses of the late 19th century, practitioners and policymakers have worked to tackle the challenges of poverty in place through an evolving set of strategies. Since then, federal, state, and local governments; philanthropy; charitable organizations; and research institutions have played important—often complementary—roles in designing, funding, and evaluating interventions. This memo traces that history. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Galvez, Martha M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Beginning with the settlement houses of the late 19th century, practitioners and policymakers have worked to tackle the challenges of poverty in place through an evolving set of strategies. Since then, federal, state, and local governments; philanthropy; charitable organizations; and research institutions have played important—often complementary—roles in designing, funding, and evaluating interventions. This memo traces that history. (Author abstract) 

    Beginning with the settlement houses of the late 19th century, practitioners and policymakers have worked to tackle the challenges of poverty in place through an evolving set of strategies. Since then, federal, state, and local governments; philanthropy; charitable organizations; and research institutions have played important—often complementary—roles in designing, funding, and evaluating interventions. This memo traces that history. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Daniel
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses homelessness prevention as a key step in promoting housing stability.

    This presentation from the Community Action Partnership 2017 Annual Convention discusses homelessness prevention as a key step in promoting housing stability.

  • Individual Author: Hussermann, Jeanette; Liberman, Akiva; Parks, Erika
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Delivering reentry services to youth proves challenging. This brief describes the implementation and sustainability of two Juvenile Second Chance Act reentry programs in Oklahoma and Virginia. Drawing from semi-structured interviews with grantees and community and state stakeholders conducted between 2013 and 2016, evaluators document the challenges to providing prerelease support and coordinating services among institutional and community supervision agencies and organizations. This brief is part of a larger evaluation of Juvenile Offender Reentry Demonstration Projects funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in fiscal year 2010. (Author abstract)

    Delivering reentry services to youth proves challenging. This brief describes the implementation and sustainability of two Juvenile Second Chance Act reentry programs in Oklahoma and Virginia. Drawing from semi-structured interviews with grantees and community and state stakeholders conducted between 2013 and 2016, evaluators document the challenges to providing prerelease support and coordinating services among institutional and community supervision agencies and organizations. This brief is part of a larger evaluation of Juvenile Offender Reentry Demonstration Projects funded by the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention in fiscal year 2010. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1997 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations