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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Turner, Margery Austin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Beginning with the settlement houses of the late 19th century, practitioners and policymakers have worked to tackle the challenges of poverty in place through an evolving set of strategies. Since then, federal, state, and local governments; philanthropy; charitable organizations; and research institutions have played important—often complementary—roles in designing, funding, and evaluating interventions. This memo traces that history. (Author abstract)

    Beginning with the settlement houses of the late 19th century, practitioners and policymakers have worked to tackle the challenges of poverty in place through an evolving set of strategies. Since then, federal, state, and local governments; philanthropy; charitable organizations; and research institutions have played important—often complementary—roles in designing, funding, and evaluating interventions. This memo traces that history. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Carson, Jessica A.; Mattingly, Marybeth J.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author introduction)

    In this brief, we use interview and focus group data to describe some of the ways that restricted rural housing stock affects working families in two rural New England counties, and explore solutions proposed by rural residents and experts to make housing affordable (see Box 1 on page 2). Rural amenities and scenery make residence in certain New England regions desirable for second-home owners, vacationers, and retirees. However, the use of housing for these purposes, combined with efforts to conserve acreage and preserve scenery, serves to diminish the supply of housing, making it unaffordable for many low- and moderate-income residents. Moreover, the housing that is available varies in quality, and regional nonprofit and federal housing assistance programs lack the capacity to meet all residents' needs. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Sharkey, Patrick
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Most of the research literature explaining the level of economic mobility in the United States focuses on characteristics of individuals or families. This article expands the focus beyond the individual and the family to consider features of communities and cities. Although evidence is strong that features of neighborhoods and cities have causal effects on individual economic mobility, there is much less evidence on the most relevant mechanisms. The article reviews the available evidence at both levels of analysis before concluding with a discussion of the implications for social policy. (author abstract)

    Most of the research literature explaining the level of economic mobility in the United States focuses on characteristics of individuals or families. This article expands the focus beyond the individual and the family to consider features of communities and cities. Although evidence is strong that features of neighborhoods and cities have causal effects on individual economic mobility, there is much less evidence on the most relevant mechanisms. The article reviews the available evidence at both levels of analysis before concluding with a discussion of the implications for social policy. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Tach, Laura; Wimer, Christopher; Emory, Allison Dwyer
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2016

    Over the years, a wide range of policy efforts have tried to improve economic, physical, and social conditions within distressed urban neighborhoods. Even as many city centers have experienced a recent revitalization, the benefits have been shared unequally by urban residents. Increases in concentrated poverty as well as income inequality and economic segregation exacerbated by the Great Recession have highlighted a need for continued investment in urban neighborhoods. Tragic events in cities such as Baltimore and Ferguson have also brought renewed focus on addressing the pervasive economic development, housing, and safety challenges facing residents of the nation’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods. In response, the Obama Administration has prioritized “place-based” interventions that target investments to address the needs of these communities, whose residents often experience restricted access to economic mobility due to a legacy of policies and practices that have engendered place-based racial and economic inequality. In this summary brief (and the longer white paper), we...

    Over the years, a wide range of policy efforts have tried to improve economic, physical, and social conditions within distressed urban neighborhoods. Even as many city centers have experienced a recent revitalization, the benefits have been shared unequally by urban residents. Increases in concentrated poverty as well as income inequality and economic segregation exacerbated by the Great Recession have highlighted a need for continued investment in urban neighborhoods. Tragic events in cities such as Baltimore and Ferguson have also brought renewed focus on addressing the pervasive economic development, housing, and safety challenges facing residents of the nation’s most disadvantaged neighborhoods. In response, the Obama Administration has prioritized “place-based” interventions that target investments to address the needs of these communities, whose residents often experience restricted access to economic mobility due to a legacy of policies and practices that have engendered place-based racial and economic inequality. In this summary brief (and the longer white paper), we review place-based policy approaches that have focused on aspects of neighborhoods central to promoting opportunity, including economic development, education, housing, and neighborhood safety. We include policies and programs that have been subject to rigorous evaluation using experimental or quasi-experimental research designs aimed at identifying the causal effects of interventions. We also bring in additional information from implementation studies or other observational research to supplement the causal analysis. This summary concludes with a description of current challenges and recommendations for place-based programming efforts. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Patterson, Kelly L.; Silverman, Robert Mark; Yin, Li; Wu, Laiyun
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    This article synthesizes existing literature to examine the emerging concept of neighborhoods of opportunity and places it in the context of past efforts to define neighborhood opportunity. Place-based and people-based approaches to urban revitalization and community development are linked to this concept. The place-based approach focuses on promoting inner-city revitalization in order to create neighborhoods of opportunity and the people-based approach focuses on connecting people to opportunities that already exist in the regions where they live. These approaches are examined in relation to how they influence emerging models for siting affordable housing in both distressed inner-cities and more opportunity rich suburbs that surround them. The article concludes with recommendations for a new tiered approach to place-based and people-based strategies for affordable housing siting in core city and regional contexts. (Author abstract)

    This article synthesizes existing literature to examine the emerging concept of neighborhoods of opportunity and places it in the context of past efforts to define neighborhood opportunity. Place-based and people-based approaches to urban revitalization and community development are linked to this concept. The place-based approach focuses on promoting inner-city revitalization in order to create neighborhoods of opportunity and the people-based approach focuses on connecting people to opportunities that already exist in the regions where they live. These approaches are examined in relation to how they influence emerging models for siting affordable housing in both distressed inner-cities and more opportunity rich suburbs that surround them. The article concludes with recommendations for a new tiered approach to place-based and people-based strategies for affordable housing siting in core city and regional contexts. (Author abstract)

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