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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Ciol, Marcia A.; Kasch, Elizabeth K.; Hoffman, Jeanne M.; Huynh, Minh; Chan, Leighton
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Background

    Disability is a dynamic process where functional status may change over time. Examination of the Medicare population suggests that, for those over age 65, disability status will fluctuate in 30% of beneficiaries each year. Less is known about those under age 65. The dynamic nature of disability is of relevance since it has important implications for social policies related to disability.

    Objectives

    To: 1) describe the characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries eligible due to disability; and 2) estimate the proportion of individuals with transitions in functional status over a one-year period stratified by baseline characteristics and diagnostic subgroups.

    Methods

    We used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey from 1995 to 2005 to examine transitions in mobility and daily activities among individuals who were eligible for Medicare coverage due to disability.

    Results

    From the standpoint of function in mobility and daily activities, the working-age Medicare population with disability is fairly stable. While 75%–90% of our...

    Background

    Disability is a dynamic process where functional status may change over time. Examination of the Medicare population suggests that, for those over age 65, disability status will fluctuate in 30% of beneficiaries each year. Less is known about those under age 65. The dynamic nature of disability is of relevance since it has important implications for social policies related to disability.

    Objectives

    To: 1) describe the characteristics of Medicare beneficiaries eligible due to disability; and 2) estimate the proportion of individuals with transitions in functional status over a one-year period stratified by baseline characteristics and diagnostic subgroups.

    Methods

    We used the Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey from 1995 to 2005 to examine transitions in mobility and daily activities among individuals who were eligible for Medicare coverage due to disability.

    Results

    From the standpoint of function in mobility and daily activities, the working-age Medicare population with disability is fairly stable. While 75%–90% of our sample reported no disability or stable disability from one year to the next, depending on the condition and disability metric, as many as 13–14% of individuals showed improvement or decline in their functional status.

    Conclusions

    In the working-age population with disability, a small percentage of individuals will improve or worsen from one year to the next. Since these transitions are associated with a variety of individual characteristics including health conditions, further research applied to larger samples is required to refine policy relevant models that might inform decisions related to ongoing eligibility for disability programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sama-Miller, Emily; Makowsky, Libby; Rowe, Gretchen; Brown, Elizabeth; Clary, Elizabeth; Castner, Laura; Satake, Miki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This study reports on a project launched in 2010 to pilot and evaluate innovative strategies to reduce SNAP participation barriers for low-income elderly by leveraging new data-sharing requirements related to Medicare assistance programs that help pay for prescription drugs or Medicare premiums. SNAP accesses the medical assistance program data and contacts those individuals that appear SNAP eligible. Grants were awarded to New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Washington. (author abstract)

    This study reports on a project launched in 2010 to pilot and evaluate innovative strategies to reduce SNAP participation barriers for low-income elderly by leveraging new data-sharing requirements related to Medicare assistance programs that help pay for prescription drugs or Medicare premiums. SNAP accesses the medical assistance program data and contacts those individuals that appear SNAP eligible. Grants were awarded to New Mexico, Pennsylvania, and Washington. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Kaiser Family Foundation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) established a voluntary outpatient prescription drug benefit for people on Medicare, known as Part D, that went into effect in 2006. All 49 million elderly and disabled beneficiaries have access to the Medicare drug benefit through private plans approved by the federal government. Medicare replaced Medicaid as the source of drug coverage for beneficiaries with coverage under both programs (“dual eligibles”). Beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets are eligible for assistance with Part D plan premiums and cost sharing. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 made some important changes to Part D – in particular, phasing out the coverage gap by 2020. (author abstract)

    The Medicare Modernization Act of 2003 (MMA) established a voluntary outpatient prescription drug benefit for people on Medicare, known as Part D, that went into effect in 2006. All 49 million elderly and disabled beneficiaries have access to the Medicare drug benefit through private plans approved by the federal government. Medicare replaced Medicaid as the source of drug coverage for beneficiaries with coverage under both programs (“dual eligibles”). Beneficiaries with low incomes and modest assets are eligible for assistance with Part D plan premiums and cost sharing. The Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 made some important changes to Part D – in particular, phasing out the coverage gap by 2020. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cubanski, Juliette; Neuman, Tricia; Damico, Anthony; Huang, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2009

    In addition to the basic benefits provided under Medicare, most beneficiaries have some source of supplemental coverage, such as employer plans or Medigap, to help pay cost-sharing requirements and pay for some services that are not covered by the program. In addition, a majority of beneficiaries have prescription drug coverage from various sources, including Medicare Part D plans that became available in 2006. Sources of supplemental coverage and drug coverage vary widely by income, race/ethnicity, urban/rural area, health status, and other characteristics.

    This chartpack presents new information on the sources of supplemental and prescription drug coverage among Medicare beneficiaries in 2007, the most recent year for which national data are available. It provides a detailed look at the characteristics of beneficiaries with various sources of drug coverage in the second year of the Medicare Part D drug benefit. The chartpack also examines prescription drug coverage and low-income drug subsidy status among beneficiaries with low incomes.

    The chartpack is organized...

    In addition to the basic benefits provided under Medicare, most beneficiaries have some source of supplemental coverage, such as employer plans or Medigap, to help pay cost-sharing requirements and pay for some services that are not covered by the program. In addition, a majority of beneficiaries have prescription drug coverage from various sources, including Medicare Part D plans that became available in 2006. Sources of supplemental coverage and drug coverage vary widely by income, race/ethnicity, urban/rural area, health status, and other characteristics.

    This chartpack presents new information on the sources of supplemental and prescription drug coverage among Medicare beneficiaries in 2007, the most recent year for which national data are available. It provides a detailed look at the characteristics of beneficiaries with various sources of drug coverage in the second year of the Medicare Part D drug benefit. The chartpack also examines prescription drug coverage and low-income drug subsidy status among beneficiaries with low incomes.

    The chartpack is organized in three sections:
    -Section 1—Supplemental Coverage. This section examines the share of Medicare beneficiaries relying on various sources of supplemental coverage in 2007, and the characteristics of beneficiaries with different types of supplemental coverage.
    -Section 2—Prescription Drug Coverage. This section describes the primary sources of prescription drug coverage among Medicare beneficiaries in 2007, and which groups of beneficiaries were more likely than others to lack drug coverage.
    -Section 3—Prescription Drug Coverage and Subsidies Among Low-Income Beneficiaries. This section examines sources of drug coverage in 2007 among low-income beneficiaries (defined as beneficiaries having annual income of $15,000 or less for individuals/$20,000 or less for couples), their enrollment in the Part D low-income subsidy (LIS) program, and sources of drug coverage for low-income beneficiaries who were not receiving low income subsidy assistance. This section also identifies characteristics of those individuals who were—and were not—receiving LIS in 2007, which could be helpful in guiding future LIS outreach efforts to certain target populations.

    This chartpack is based on Kaiser Family Foundation analysis of data from the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS) Medicare Current Beneficiary Survey (MCBS) Access to Care file, 2007. The Access to Care file contains demographic and health insurance data for a nationally representative sample of 15,806 Medicare beneficiaries, along with information on health and functional status, access to care, and satisfaction with care. More information about the MCBS Access to Care file and methods used in analyzing the data is provided in the Appendix. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Wittenburg, David; Baird, Peter; Schwartz, Lisa; Butler, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2008

    Many Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries have serious health care needs, but, under current law, most are not eligible for Medicare until 29 months after the Social Security Administration (SSA) has established the onset of their disability. To test whether providing immediate health care and related services leads to improved health and better return-to-work outcomes for newly entitled SSDI beneficiaries, SSA funded the five-year Accelerated Benefits (AB) Demonstration. AB will provide the first set of rigorous findings on the efficacy of providing earlier access to health benefits for a population of beneficiaries who have no medical coverage when they first become entitled to disability cash benefits. This policy brief provides an overview of the AB project and describes findings from the initial phase of enrollment from October and November 2007 and plans for full implementation. (author abstract)

    Many Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) beneficiaries have serious health care needs, but, under current law, most are not eligible for Medicare until 29 months after the Social Security Administration (SSA) has established the onset of their disability. To test whether providing immediate health care and related services leads to improved health and better return-to-work outcomes for newly entitled SSDI beneficiaries, SSA funded the five-year Accelerated Benefits (AB) Demonstration. AB will provide the first set of rigorous findings on the efficacy of providing earlier access to health benefits for a population of beneficiaries who have no medical coverage when they first become entitled to disability cash benefits. This policy brief provides an overview of the AB project and describes findings from the initial phase of enrollment from October and November 2007 and plans for full implementation. (author abstract)

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