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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Wheaton, Laura; Lynch, Victoria; Johnson, Martha C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

    This report examines the overlap in eligibility of children and nonelderly adults for Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) and Medicaid/Children’s Health Insurance Program (CHIP) benefits in 2013, prior to Medicaid expansion under the Affordable Care Act. We find that over half of children eligible for one program were eligible for both, and nearly all of the remaining children were eligible for Medicaid/CHIP. A substantially smaller share of parents and nonparents were eligible for both SNAP and Medicaid/CHIP. The report also provides state-level estimates to allow calculation of state joint program participation rates. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Spillman, Brenda C.; Clemans-Cope, Lisa; Mallik-Kane, Kamala; Hayes, Emily
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

    Many states have expanded Medicaid eligibility to reach a wider array of vulnerable and historically uninsured populations. While Medicaid cannot pay for medical services provided in prisons or jails, people who are arrested and incarcerated can enroll in Medicaid and become eligible for benefits in the community. Given the high prevalence of mental health issues, substance abuse, and chronic health conditions among criminal justice populations, providing health care services to them could improve public health and public safety outcomes. This brief highlights initiatives in New York and Rhode Island that use the Medicaid health home model to improve continuity of care for justice-involved individuals. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: National Women's Law Center
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Medicaid is primarily known as the government program that provides health insurance coverage to individuals struggling to make ends meet. Women make up the majority of Medicaid enrollees, and the program covers a range of services – birth control, maternity care, prescription drugs, hospitalization, long-term care, and more – that address many of women’s major health needs throughout their lives. At the same time, Medicaid plays a critically important role in advancing women’s economic security through directly supporting women’s jobs and by providing health insurance coverage that enables women to work. Proposals to fundamentally change how Medicaid is financed and create barriers to enrollment threaten the livelihood of millions of women. (Author introduction)

    Medicaid is primarily known as the government program that provides health insurance coverage to individuals struggling to make ends meet. Women make up the majority of Medicaid enrollees, and the program covers a range of services – birth control, maternity care, prescription drugs, hospitalization, long-term care, and more – that address many of women’s major health needs throughout their lives. At the same time, Medicaid plays a critically important role in advancing women’s economic security through directly supporting women’s jobs and by providing health insurance coverage that enables women to work. Proposals to fundamentally change how Medicaid is financed and create barriers to enrollment threaten the livelihood of millions of women. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Foutz, Julia; Artiga, Samantha; Garfield, Rachel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    People in rural areas face unique challenges in health care coverage and access, including low density of providers and longer travel times to care, limited access to employer-sponsored coverage, and greater health care needs due to older age and lower income. Medicaid plays an important role in helping to address these challenges. This brief provides insight into the role of Medicaid in rural areas and discusses how expansions or reductions in Medicaid such as those currently under debate could affect rural areas. The analysis is based on data from the 2013-2015 American Community Survey and classifies counties as “rural” based on an Index of Relative Rurality (IRR). We group counties into quintiles of rurality and define those with the highest degree of rurality as “rural,” those with the lowest degree as “urban,” and those in the middle as “other.” While Medicaid provides assistance to many low-income elderly individuals, primarily as a wrap-around benefit to Medicare, this analysis focuses on its role in covering nonelderly children and adults. The analysis shows that...

    People in rural areas face unique challenges in health care coverage and access, including low density of providers and longer travel times to care, limited access to employer-sponsored coverage, and greater health care needs due to older age and lower income. Medicaid plays an important role in helping to address these challenges. This brief provides insight into the role of Medicaid in rural areas and discusses how expansions or reductions in Medicaid such as those currently under debate could affect rural areas. The analysis is based on data from the 2013-2015 American Community Survey and classifies counties as “rural” based on an Index of Relative Rurality (IRR). We group counties into quintiles of rurality and define those with the highest degree of rurality as “rural,” those with the lowest degree as “urban,” and those in the middle as “other.” While Medicaid provides assistance to many low-income elderly individuals, primarily as a wrap-around benefit to Medicare, this analysis focuses on its role in covering nonelderly children and adults. The analysis shows that Medicaid plays a particularly important role providing coverage in rural areas and that gains in Medicaid coverage have helped reduce the uninsured rate in rural areas. More detail on the methods underlying the analysis is available in the “methods” box at the end of the brief. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2016

    This set of selections focuses on CHIP and Medicaid. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of selections focuses on CHIP and Medicaid. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

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