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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2017

    This set of selections focuses on rapid attachment to employment. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

    This set of selections focuses on rapid attachment to employment. SSRC Selections highlight research, evaluation reports, and other publications that inform the field about key issues in, and effective practices for, fostering economic self-sufficiency.

  • Individual Author: Hock, Heinrich; Luca, Dara Lee; Kautz, Tim; Stapleton, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    We use data from a randomized evaluation of the Job Corps program to understand its impacts for youth with limitations from medical conditions. Job Corps was originally designed for economically disadvantaged youth facing education or employment barriers due to their community living environment. The program provides all enrollees with an integrated package of work-focused supports including general education, vocational training, soft skills development, and ultimately job placement. Our findings provide new information about the program’s impacts for approximately 470 youth with medical limitations (YMLs) included in the 1990s National Job Corps Study. Although YMLs were at greater risk for adverse outcomes relative to other enrollees, the impacts of Job Corps for this group have not been previously assessed. We find positive, large, and significant impacts per participant on self-reported employment and earnings; further, the program significantly reduced their dependence on long-term disability benefits. These estimated per-participant impacts were at least twice the size of...

    We use data from a randomized evaluation of the Job Corps program to understand its impacts for youth with limitations from medical conditions. Job Corps was originally designed for economically disadvantaged youth facing education or employment barriers due to their community living environment. The program provides all enrollees with an integrated package of work-focused supports including general education, vocational training, soft skills development, and ultimately job placement. Our findings provide new information about the program’s impacts for approximately 470 youth with medical limitations (YMLs) included in the 1990s National Job Corps Study. Although YMLs were at greater risk for adverse outcomes relative to other enrollees, the impacts of Job Corps for this group have not been previously assessed. We find positive, large, and significant impacts per participant on self-reported employment and earnings; further, the program significantly reduced their dependence on long-term disability benefits. These estimated per-participant impacts were at least twice the size of the corresponding impacts for other youths who did not have medical limitations at enrollment. Although more research on current program operations is needed, our findings suggest that Job Corps could help meet state and national policy goals for improving adult work outcomes for youth with disabilities and reducing their reliance on disability benefits. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Farrell, Mary; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Bridge to Employment in the Healthcare Industry program, designed by the San Diego Workforce Partnership and operated by three community-based organizations in San Diego County, California. Bridge to Employment is one promising effort to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. It is one of nine career pathways programs being evaluated under the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Bridge to Employment program consisted of five components: (1) Assessments to determine eligibility for training programs; (2) Navigation and case management services to help students choose their training and address barriers to participation; (3) Individual training account (ITA) vouchers to cover the cost of training; (4) Supportive services for transportation, child care, and other services; and (5) Employment services to help participants find employment...

    This report documents the implementation and early impacts of the Bridge to Employment in the Healthcare Industry program, designed by the San Diego Workforce Partnership and operated by three community-based organizations in San Diego County, California. Bridge to Employment is one promising effort to help low-income, low-skilled adults access and complete occupational training that can lead to increased employment and higher earnings. It is one of nine career pathways programs being evaluated under the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education (PACE) study sponsored by the Administration for Children and Families. The Bridge to Employment program consisted of five components: (1) Assessments to determine eligibility for training programs; (2) Navigation and case management services to help students choose their training and address barriers to participation; (3) Individual training account (ITA) vouchers to cover the cost of training; (4) Supportive services for transportation, child care, and other services; and (5) Employment services to help participants find employment after training. Using a rigorous research design, the study found that Bridge to Employment increased the credentials its participants received and increased employment in a healthcare occupation within the 18-month follow-up period. Future reports will examine whether these effects translate into economic gains in the workplace in the longer term. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Mabli, James; Cheban, Irina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance benefits to low-income people in an effort to reduce hunger and improve health and well-being. It is also a critical work support for many people. Policymakers recently have sought to strengthen the program participants’ pathways toward self-sufficiency, including considering existing and new work requirements for participants and improving and expanding the SNAP Employment and Training program that assists unemployed and underemployed participants in job search, job skills training, education, and work experience and training. However, relatively little is known about the labor force participation and employment decisions of SNAP participants, job characteristics among employed participants, and barriers to work among participants who are unemployed or out of the labor force (referred to as non-employed). This report helps to fill this gap by using the most recently available national longitudinal survey data to examine the employment experiences of SNAP participants. (Author abstract)

    The Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP) provides nutrition assistance benefits to low-income people in an effort to reduce hunger and improve health and well-being. It is also a critical work support for many people. Policymakers recently have sought to strengthen the program participants’ pathways toward self-sufficiency, including considering existing and new work requirements for participants and improving and expanding the SNAP Employment and Training program that assists unemployed and underemployed participants in job search, job skills training, education, and work experience and training. However, relatively little is known about the labor force participation and employment decisions of SNAP participants, job characteristics among employed participants, and barriers to work among participants who are unemployed or out of the labor force (referred to as non-employed). This report helps to fill this gap by using the most recently available national longitudinal survey data to examine the employment experiences of SNAP participants. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Richard W.; Wang, Claire Xiaozhi
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Working longer can significantly benefit older adults, improving their financial security and possibly their physical and emotional health. Older adults have been working more over the past two decades, but employment gains after age 65 have been concentrated among college graduates. Early retirement will likely create growing financial challenges for less-educated older adults, who risk falling further behind their better-educated peers. This chartbook shows how trends in various outcomes, including labor force participation, full-time employment, self-employment, and earnings, differ by education, age, and sex for older adults. (Author abstract)

    Working longer can significantly benefit older adults, improving their financial security and possibly their physical and emotional health. Older adults have been working more over the past two decades, but employment gains after age 65 have been concentrated among college graduates. Early retirement will likely create growing financial challenges for less-educated older adults, who risk falling further behind their better-educated peers. This chartbook shows how trends in various outcomes, including labor force participation, full-time employment, self-employment, and earnings, differ by education, age, and sex for older adults. (Author abstract)

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