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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Eckrich Sommer, Teresa ; Sabol, Terri J. ; Chor, Elise ; Schneider, William ; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Small, Mario L. ; King, Christopher ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Yoder, Duane; Wulff, Carli; Baumgartner, Scott; Sims, Marjorie; Westbrook, T'Pring
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    The purpose of this breakout session was to bring together practitioners, funders, and policymakers to discuss ongoing efforts and future opportunities for research and evaluation of two-generation programs. Duane Yoder (Garrett County Community Action) served as a discussant and Carli Wulff (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (Author introduction)

    The purpose of this breakout session was to bring together practitioners, funders, and policymakers to discuss ongoing efforts and future opportunities for research and evaluation of two-generation programs. Duane Yoder (Garrett County Community Action) served as a discussant and Carli Wulff (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri J.; King, Christopher T.; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Chor, Elise
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    CAP Tulsa is at the forefront of two-generation education programming and research for low-income parents and their children. This anti-poverty community action agency in Tulsa, Oklahoma has been highly successful to date in helping parents advance educationally and attain workforce-applicable certification in the healthcare field while their young children are engaged in CAP Tulsa’s high-quality early education programs. These achievements are particularly noteworthy when compared with the lower success rates of other postsecondary education and workforce development programs that often focus on low-income adults, not parents. We recommend that CAP Tulsa remain a leader in the two-generation field. 
     
    In this report, which represents the progress made during Year 4 of the CAP Family Life Study, we use study data to suggest that the CareerAdvance® program, in its current form, is both serving a population of CAP Tulsa parents who are largely well-suited for the program (i.e. economically disadvantaged and psychologically healthy) and offering a package of supportive...

    CAP Tulsa is at the forefront of two-generation education programming and research for low-income parents and their children. This anti-poverty community action agency in Tulsa, Oklahoma has been highly successful to date in helping parents advance educationally and attain workforce-applicable certification in the healthcare field while their young children are engaged in CAP Tulsa’s high-quality early education programs. These achievements are particularly noteworthy when compared with the lower success rates of other postsecondary education and workforce development programs that often focus on low-income adults, not parents. We recommend that CAP Tulsa remain a leader in the two-generation field. 
     
    In this report, which represents the progress made during Year 4 of the CAP Family Life Study, we use study data to suggest that the CareerAdvance® program, in its current form, is both serving a population of CAP Tulsa parents who are largely well-suited for the program (i.e. economically disadvantaged and psychologically healthy) and offering a package of supportive services that seem to be well-matched to their needs and interests. The data are also suggestive of potential avenues for cutting program expenses and further strengthening program offerings. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri J.; King, Christopher T. ; Smith, Tara ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    CareerAdvance®— administered by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP Tulsa)— combines Head Start services with education and stackable training in the healthcare sector. The program draws on the best innovations from the adult education literature by offering a sequence of programs in partnership with community colleges so that participants can make concrete progress, exit at various points with certificates, and then return for further advancement. CareerAdvance® also provides a number of key supportive components, including career coaches, financial incentives, and peer group meetings, to prepare parents for high-demand jobs in the healthcare sector. CareerAdvance® is one of the only fully-operating, two-generation, human capital programs in the country.

    The CAP Family Life Study is a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods, multi-level study of CareerAdvance®, in which we examine the short-term and longer-term effects of the program on family, parent, and child outcomes. The research team for the CAP Family Life Study includes P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Teresa...

    CareerAdvance®— administered by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP Tulsa)— combines Head Start services with education and stackable training in the healthcare sector. The program draws on the best innovations from the adult education literature by offering a sequence of programs in partnership with community colleges so that participants can make concrete progress, exit at various points with certificates, and then return for further advancement. CareerAdvance® also provides a number of key supportive components, including career coaches, financial incentives, and peer group meetings, to prepare parents for high-demand jobs in the healthcare sector. CareerAdvance® is one of the only fully-operating, two-generation, human capital programs in the country.

    The CAP Family Life Study is a quasi-experimental, mixed-methods, multi-level study of CareerAdvance®, in which we examine the short-term and longer-term effects of the program on family, parent, and child outcomes. The research team for the CAP Family Life Study includes P. Lindsay Chase-Lansdale, Teresa Eckrich Sommer, and Terri Sabol from Northwestern University, Christopher King from the University of Texas at Austin, Jeanne Brooks-Gunn at Columbia University, and Hirokazu Yoshikawa at New York University. The current study investigates how variation in program participation is linked to different subgroup patterns of educational attainment, employment, and family health and well-being. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri J.; King, Christopher T.; Smith, Tara; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    CareerAdvance®, launched by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP), is a healthcare workforce development program designed for low-income parents of young children enrolled in CAP’s early childhood education programs. The two-generation approach of CareerAdvance® is one of the only sectoral workforce development programs with the explicit goal of improving outcomes simultaneously for both parents and children. The present evaluation of CareerAdvance® represents a strong collaboration between university research partners and CAP. The research partnership began in 2008 when nationally-recognized leaders in workforce program and policy development worked with CAP to design CareerAdvance®, which was launched in 2009. In early 2010, national experts in developmental science broadened the research scope of the study to focus on children’s development and family functioning in addition to parents’ education, training, and financial well-being. (Excerpt from author introduction)

    CareerAdvance®, launched by the Community Action Project of Tulsa County (CAP), is a healthcare workforce development program designed for low-income parents of young children enrolled in CAP’s early childhood education programs. The two-generation approach of CareerAdvance® is one of the only sectoral workforce development programs with the explicit goal of improving outcomes simultaneously for both parents and children. The present evaluation of CareerAdvance® represents a strong collaboration between university research partners and CAP. The research partnership began in 2008 when nationally-recognized leaders in workforce program and policy development worked with CAP to design CareerAdvance®, which was launched in 2009. In early 2010, national experts in developmental science broadened the research scope of the study to focus on children’s development and family functioning in addition to parents’ education, training, and financial well-being. (Excerpt from author introduction)

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