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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Eyster, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief presents findings from an analysis of young adults in the US who successfully moved beyond initial career pathway steps to attain middle-skill jobs. Using the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we examine the postsecondary and employment trajectories of the young adults through their early thirties who earn more than one postsecondary credential, compared to those who don't. We also explore the challenges young adults may face in advancing their schooling and careers beyond a first credential. The brief concludes with implications for career pathways relevant to policymakers and practitioners supporting young adults' advancement toward middle-skill jobs. (Author abstract)

    This brief presents findings from an analysis of young adults in the US who successfully moved beyond initial career pathway steps to attain middle-skill jobs. Using the 1997 National Longitudinal Survey of Youth, we examine the postsecondary and employment trajectories of the young adults through their early thirties who earn more than one postsecondary credential, compared to those who don't. We also explore the challenges young adults may face in advancing their schooling and careers beyond a first credential. The brief concludes with implications for career pathways relevant to policymakers and practitioners supporting young adults' advancement toward middle-skill jobs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Schwartz, Deena; Koralek, Robin; Loprest, Pamela; Sick, Nathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This is the final report of the National Implementation Evaluation (NIE) of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG). In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of 5-year HPOG grants (HPOG 1.0) to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. HPOG 1.0 grantees designed and implemented programs to provide eligible participants with education, occupational training, and support and employment services to help them train for and find jobs in a variety of healthcare professions. (Author abstract) 

    This is the final report of the National Implementation Evaluation (NIE) of the Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG). In 2010, the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services awarded the first round of 5-year HPOG grants (HPOG 1.0) to 32 organizations in 23 states; five were tribal organizations. The purpose of the HPOG Program is to provide education and training to Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) recipients and other low-income individuals for occupations in the healthcare field that pay well and are expected to either experience labor shortages or be in high demand. HPOG 1.0 grantees designed and implemented programs to provide eligible participants with education, occupational training, and support and employment services to help them train for and find jobs in a variety of healthcare professions. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Eckrich Sommer, Teresa ; Sabol, Terri J. ; Chor, Elise ; Schneider, William ; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Small, Mario L. ; King, Christopher ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Hanks, Angela; McGrew, Annie; Zessoules, Daniella
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The analysis in this issue brief examines apprenticeship programs over the past decade—from fiscal year 2008 through 2017—to observe gaps in participation and wages among women and people of color. In general, it finds that women remain deeply underrepresented in apprenticeship programs and that wages among women and black or African American apprentices are much lower than those of other apprentices. Even though these programs are intended and have the potential to develop the U.S. workforce, increase earnings, and prepare workers for the jobs of the future, their current gender and racial compositions tell a different story more work must be done to make it a reality. (Author introduction)

    The analysis in this issue brief examines apprenticeship programs over the past decade—from fiscal year 2008 through 2017—to observe gaps in participation and wages among women and people of color. In general, it finds that women remain deeply underrepresented in apprenticeship programs and that wages among women and black or African American apprentices are much lower than those of other apprentices. Even though these programs are intended and have the potential to develop the U.S. workforce, increase earnings, and prepare workers for the jobs of the future, their current gender and racial compositions tell a different story more work must be done to make it a reality. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Forster, Hilary; Gardiner, Karen; Harvill, Eleanor; Klerman, Jacob
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    This session provided a closer look at implementation and impact findings from two rigorous career pathways evaluations: the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Impact Study and the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education project. This was followed by a discussion of the broader career pathways literature and context for interpreting findings. Hilary Forster (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    This session provided a closer look at implementation and impact findings from two rigorous career pathways evaluations: the Health Profession Opportunity Grants Impact Study and the Pathways for Advancing Careers and Education project. This was followed by a discussion of the broader career pathways literature and context for interpreting findings. Hilary Forster (Administration for Children and Families) moderated this session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

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