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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Eckrich Sommer, Teresa ; Sabol, Terri J. ; Chor, Elise ; Schneider, William ; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay ; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne ; Small, Mario L. ; King, Christopher ; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

    We propose a two-generation anti-poverty strategy to improve the economic fortunes of children in the United States. Our policy bridges two traditionally siloed interventions to boost their impacts: Head Start for children and career pathway training offered through community colleges for adults. We expect that an integrated two-generation human capital intervention will produce greater gains than either Head Start or community college alone for developmental and motivational, logistical and financial, social capital, and efficiency reasons. We suggest a competitive grant program to test and evaluate different models using federal dollars. We estimate average benefit-cost ratios across a range of promising career fields of 1.3 within five years and 7.9 within ten years if 10 percent of Head Start parents participate in two-generation programs. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Wright, Girley; Cummings, Danielle; Millenky, Megan; Valentine, Erin
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Employment rates for disadvantaged youth and young adults were falling even before the Great Recession, but this group was particularly hard-hit by the downturn, and their rates of joblessness remain stubbornly high. This session presented results from three rigorous evaluations of large-scale programs designed to improve employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth. Girley Wright (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

    Employment rates for disadvantaged youth and young adults were falling even before the Great Recession, but this group was particularly hard-hit by the downturn, and their rates of joblessness remain stubbornly high. This session presented results from three rigorous evaluations of large-scale programs designed to improve employment outcomes for disadvantaged youth. Girley Wright (Administration for Children and Families) moderated the session. Various methodologies were used across the presentations. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Gardiner, Karen; Martinson, Karin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    There is longstanding interest among policy makers and program operators in finding ways to increase the skill levels of low-income individuals, improve their enrollment in and completion of post-secondary education, and improve their economic prospects. The career pathways approach is gaining steady acceptance as a promising strategy to address these challenges and improve post-secondary education and training for low-income and low-skilled adults.

    This summary is an easy-to-read overview of the Innovative Strategies for Increasing Self-Sufficiency project; a major national effort to evaluate the effectiveness of nine career pathways programs using an experimental design. the ISIS study. The summary includes the frame career pathway programming, the promise of these programs, and a list of the nine programs being evaluated in the study. (author abstract)

    There is longstanding interest among policy makers and program operators in finding ways to increase the skill levels of low-income individuals, improve their enrollment in and completion of post-secondary education, and improve their economic prospects. The career pathways approach is gaining steady acceptance as a promising strategy to address these challenges and improve post-secondary education and training for low-income and low-skilled adults.

    This summary is an easy-to-read overview of the Innovative Strategies for Increasing Self-Sufficiency project; a major national effort to evaluate the effectiveness of nine career pathways programs using an experimental design. the ISIS study. The summary includes the frame career pathway programming, the promise of these programs, and a list of the nine programs being evaluated in the study. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa; McDonnell, Rachel Pleasants; Soricone, Lisa
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    This presentation describes Accelerating Opportunity (AO), a multi-state career pathways initiative designed to provide a more streamlined path for adults with low basic skills to move from integrated adult basic education and skills attainment to stackable credentials with labor market value.  The presentation includes some evaluation findings as well as discussion of partnerships the involved colleges have leveraged.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    This presentation describes Accelerating Opportunity (AO), a multi-state career pathways initiative designed to provide a more streamlined path for adults with low basic skills to move from integrated adult basic education and skills attainment to stackable credentials with labor market value.  The presentation includes some evaluation findings as well as discussion of partnerships the involved colleges have leveraged.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Greenstone, Michael; Looney, Adam
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    This paper discusses the importance of effective training and workforce development programs as part of a broader strategy to increase the competitiveness of American workers. Although rapid technological change and increasing global competition have delivered great economic benefits to the U.S. economy overall, the development of new and more productive industries has caused some Americans to experience significant declines in their earnings and job prospects, and the Great Recession exacerbated these longer-term trends. Workers with less education and those who have been displaced from long-tenured jobs face particular challenges, and effective job training programs are an important component of policies to help these workers. The Hamilton Project proposes two general principles that can guide policymakers in improving training programs to aid American workers: (1) training funds should be directed to programs with a track record of success in improving earnings for the specific target population and to those workers who can benefit the most from those programs; and (2)...

    This paper discusses the importance of effective training and workforce development programs as part of a broader strategy to increase the competitiveness of American workers. Although rapid technological change and increasing global competition have delivered great economic benefits to the U.S. economy overall, the development of new and more productive industries has caused some Americans to experience significant declines in their earnings and job prospects, and the Great Recession exacerbated these longer-term trends. Workers with less education and those who have been displaced from long-tenured jobs face particular challenges, and effective job training programs are an important component of policies to help these workers. The Hamilton Project proposes two general principles that can guide policymakers in improving training programs to aid American workers: (1) training funds should be directed to programs with a track record of success in improving earnings for the specific target population and to those workers who can benefit the most from those programs; and (2) training programs should directly engage employer and industry partners, or actively guide students to career-specific training. (author abstract)

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