Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Eyster, Lauren; Barnow, Burt S.; Anderson, Theresa; Conway, Maureen; Lerman, Robert I.; Jain, Ranita; Kuehn, Daniel; Montes, Marcela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief summarizes findings from implementation, impact, and cost-benefit evaluations of Accelerating Opportunity (AO). AO is a career pathways initiative launched in 2011 that aims to help adults with low basic skills earn valued occupational credentials, obtain well-paying jobs, and sustain rewarding careers. AO was one of the first efforts to replicate and scale key elements of Washington state's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) model. The evaluation took place in Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Louisiana. The evidence shows that AO holds promise for changing college systems and promoting educational gains among low-skilled adults. Earnings impacts are mixed. (Author abstract) 

    This brief summarizes findings from implementation, impact, and cost-benefit evaluations of Accelerating Opportunity (AO). AO is a career pathways initiative launched in 2011 that aims to help adults with low basic skills earn valued occupational credentials, obtain well-paying jobs, and sustain rewarding careers. AO was one of the first efforts to replicate and scale key elements of Washington state's Integrated Basic Education and Skills Training (I-BEST) model. The evaluation took place in Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Louisiana. The evidence shows that AO holds promise for changing college systems and promoting educational gains among low-skilled adults. Earnings impacts are mixed. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop reports findings from an evaluation of Accelerated Opportunity and outcomes such as college credit attainment and earnings.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop reports findings from an evaluation of Accelerated Opportunity and outcomes such as college credit attainment and earnings.

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa; Kuehn, Daniel ; Eyster, Lauren ; Barnow, Burt S.; Lerman, Robert I.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This final impact report describes the effect of Accelerating Opportunity (AO) on education and employment outcomes for underprepared adult learners. Designed and led by Jobs for the Future and national partners, AO allowed adults with low basic skills to enroll in integrated career pathways at community and technical colleges. The quasi-experimental impact analysis shows that AO students earned more credentials while taking fewer credits, suggesting more efficient course-taking and accelerated learning. These achievements did not translate into labor market gains in the observed timeframe for all students, though AO had strong and sustained positive earnings impacts for some student subgroups. (Author abstract) 

    This final impact report describes the effect of Accelerating Opportunity (AO) on education and employment outcomes for underprepared adult learners. Designed and led by Jobs for the Future and national partners, AO allowed adults with low basic skills to enroll in integrated career pathways at community and technical colleges. The quasi-experimental impact analysis shows that AO students earned more credentials while taking fewer credits, suggesting more efficient course-taking and accelerated learning. These achievements did not translate into labor market gains in the observed timeframe for all students, though AO had strong and sustained positive earnings impacts for some student subgroups. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa; Eyster, Lauren; Lerman, Robert I.; Conway, Maureen; Jain, Ranita; Montes, Marcela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Accelerating Opportunity (AO) combined integrated career pathways at two-year colleges with team teaching, acceleration strategies, supportive services, and policy changes. It aimed to help low-skilled adults earn occupational credentials, obtain well-paying jobs, and sustain rewarding careers. This final implementation report documents activities and outcomes for AO states and colleges in Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Louisiana. Ingredients for successful implementation included receiving state leadership support, remedying policy barriers, considering college institutional factors, investing in team teaching, utilizing partnerships within and outside the colleges, and providing student supports. (Author abstract)

    Accelerating Opportunity (AO) combined integrated career pathways at two-year colleges with team teaching, acceleration strategies, supportive services, and policy changes. It aimed to help low-skilled adults earn occupational credentials, obtain well-paying jobs, and sustain rewarding careers. This final implementation report documents activities and outcomes for AO states and colleges in Illinois, Kansas, Kentucky, and Louisiana. Ingredients for successful implementation included receiving state leadership support, remedying policy barriers, considering college institutional factors, investing in team teaching, utilizing partnerships within and outside the colleges, and providing student supports. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa; Eyster, Lauren; Lerman, Robert; O'Brien, Carolyn; Conway, Maureen; Jain, Ranita; Montes, Marcela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    Launched in 2011, the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative aims to help students who have low basic skills to earn valued occupational credentials, obtain well-paying jobs, and sustain rewarding careers. The model focuses on students who score between the 6th- and 12th-grade level in basic skill areas but who are interested in earning technical credentials. In particular, AO is designed for adult education students who lack high school diplomas or the equivalent. AO encourages states to change the delivery of adult education for these students by allowing community and technical colleges to enroll them in for-credit career and technical education (CTE) courses at the same time as they earn their high school credentials, improve their basic academic skills, or build their English language abilities. The CTE programs in which students enroll are structured as credit-bearing college and career pathways with enhanced support services. Each pathway must incorporate integrated instruction, which combines basic skills and technical training that is contextualized for the occupation...

    Launched in 2011, the Accelerating Opportunity (AO) initiative aims to help students who have low basic skills to earn valued occupational credentials, obtain well-paying jobs, and sustain rewarding careers. The model focuses on students who score between the 6th- and 12th-grade level in basic skill areas but who are interested in earning technical credentials. In particular, AO is designed for adult education students who lack high school diplomas or the equivalent. AO encourages states to change the delivery of adult education for these students by allowing community and technical colleges to enroll them in for-credit career and technical education (CTE) courses at the same time as they earn their high school credentials, improve their basic academic skills, or build their English language abilities. The CTE programs in which students enroll are structured as credit-bearing college and career pathways with enhanced support services. Each pathway must incorporate integrated instruction, which combines basic skills and technical training that is contextualized for the occupation targeted. This approach not only makes CTE courses accessible for students with low basic skills but also is intended to enhance the quality of instruction by having an adult education instructor “team-teach” with the CTE instructor. AO is also designed to change how states and colleges coordinate with government, business, and community partners by reforming policy and practice to make it easier for students with low basic skills to access and succeed in postsecondary education and the workforce.

    As a part of a rigorous evaluation of the AO initiative, this report documents and assesses the first two years of the AO initiative in the four states active in both years. This period covers the spring 2012 to fall 2013 semesters in Illinois, Kansas, and Kentucky, and the fall 2012 to summer 2014 semesters in Louisiana. The data presented in this report come from a survey of all AO colleges, site visits to the participating states, program documentation, and quarterly calls with AO states and colleges. The first two years of the AO initiative represented a period of growth and change for the states and colleges, as they came to understand this new model for serving low-skilled adults and learned how to implement AO effectively in their state and colleges. The findings in this report focus on the development of the initiative in the second year and on changes from the first year of implementation. For consistency in these comparisons, the detailed findings are limited to the 34 colleges that participated in AO across both years. (author abstract)