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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Fontaine, Jocelyn ; Kurs, Emma
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    With funding from the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation contracted with the Urban Institute to conduct an implementation evaluation of OFA’s Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”). Six organizations were funded to implement a range of activities intended to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This brief, one of three in a series, focuses on the economic stability activities implemented by the projects. Economic stability was a core focus of the Fatherhood Reentry projects based on the extant literature highlighting formerly incarcerated people’s needs for assistance in achieving self-sufficiency to reach their reentry and family reunification goals. Incarceration is a risk factor for unemployment, and formerly incarcerated people have difficulty achieving economic stability for various reasons that encompass both personal challenges and systemic barriers. This brief provides a short overview...

    With funding from the Office of Family Assistance (OFA), the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation contracted with the Urban Institute to conduct an implementation evaluation of OFA’s Community-Centered Responsible Fatherhood Ex-Prisoner Reentry Pilot Projects (“Fatherhood Reentry”). Six organizations were funded to implement a range of activities intended to help stabilize fathers and their families, help move fathers toward economic self sufficiency, and reduce recidivism. This brief, one of three in a series, focuses on the economic stability activities implemented by the projects. Economic stability was a core focus of the Fatherhood Reentry projects based on the extant literature highlighting formerly incarcerated people’s needs for assistance in achieving self-sufficiency to reach their reentry and family reunification goals. Incarceration is a risk factor for unemployment, and formerly incarcerated people have difficulty achieving economic stability for various reasons that encompass both personal challenges and systemic barriers. This brief provides a short overview of this literature, highlighting the importance of economic stability activities for fathers who are incarcerated or were formerly incarcerated, the barriers people face upon their return to the community, and how employment is associated with better outcomes among returning people, their families, and the community. We then include descriptions of the activities the Fatherhood Reentry projects used to foster economic stability for participating fathers and their families. We conclude with recommendations, based on the experiences of the Fatherhood Reentry projects, for practitioners implementing economic stability activities for the reentry population. (Author introduction) 

  • Individual Author: Institute for Research on Poverty - University of Wisconsin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Since the mid-1960s, the rate of prime-age American men working or actively looking for work has steadily declined. During this time period, marriage rates have also fallen precipitously, particularly among less-educated groups. A growing body of research has also begun to document a rise in poor health and premature mortality among these populations. These demographic and health-related shifts both reflect and contribute to poverty and economic inequality. Reversing these trends has the potential to improve labor force participation and social well-being as well as boost economic growth. This brief synthesizes current research on work and well-being among less-educated men, many of whom are low-income or poor. It highlights the recent research on labor market characteristics, barriers to work, and family and social ties, and identifies knowledge gaps about why these men's labor force participation has fallen and how social policy can address this trend. (Author abstract)

    Since the mid-1960s, the rate of prime-age American men working or actively looking for work has steadily declined. During this time period, marriage rates have also fallen precipitously, particularly among less-educated groups. A growing body of research has also begun to document a rise in poor health and premature mortality among these populations. These demographic and health-related shifts both reflect and contribute to poverty and economic inequality. Reversing these trends has the potential to improve labor force participation and social well-being as well as boost economic growth. This brief synthesizes current research on work and well-being among less-educated men, many of whom are low-income or poor. It highlights the recent research on labor market characteristics, barriers to work, and family and social ties, and identifies knowledge gaps about why these men's labor force participation has fallen and how social policy can address this trend. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bailey, Martha J. (editor); DiPrete, Thomas A. (editor)
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2016

    Contents

    Five Decades of Remarkable but Slowing Change in U.S. Women’s Economic and Social Status and Political Participation 1

    Martha J. Bailey and Thomas A. DiPrete

    Part I. Working Hours, Opting Out, and the Gender Wage Gap

    The Opt-Out Continuation: Education, Work, and Motherhood from 1984 to 2012 34

    Tanya Byker

    Long Work Hours, Part-Time Work, and Trends in the Gender Gap in Pay, the Motherhood Wage Penalty, and the Fatherhood Wage Premium 71

    Kim A. Weeden, Youngjoo Cha, and Mauricio Bucca

    Part II. Motherhood, Work, and the Family Pay Gap

    The Family Gap in Pay: New Evidence for 1967 to 2013 104

    Ipshita Pal and Jane Waldfogel

    Motherhood and the Wages of Women in Professional Occupations 128

    Claudia Buchmann and Anne McDaniel

    Part III. Women’s Work in Nontraditionally Female Occupations and STEM Fields

    Gender Differences in the Early Career Outcomes of College Graduates...

    Contents

    Five Decades of Remarkable but Slowing Change in U.S. Women’s Economic and Social Status and Political Participation 1

    Martha J. Bailey and Thomas A. DiPrete

    Part I. Working Hours, Opting Out, and the Gender Wage Gap

    The Opt-Out Continuation: Education, Work, and Motherhood from 1984 to 2012 34

    Tanya Byker

    Long Work Hours, Part-Time Work, and Trends in the Gender Gap in Pay, the Motherhood Wage Penalty, and the Fatherhood Wage Premium 71

    Kim A. Weeden, Youngjoo Cha, and Mauricio Bucca

    Part II. Motherhood, Work, and the Family Pay Gap

    The Family Gap in Pay: New Evidence for 1967 to 2013 104

    Ipshita Pal and Jane Waldfogel

    Motherhood and the Wages of Women in Professional Occupations 128

    Claudia Buchmann and Anne McDaniel

    Part III. Women’s Work in Nontraditionally Female Occupations and STEM Fields

    Gender Differences in the Early Career Outcomes of College Graduates: The Influence of Sex-Type of Degree Field Across Four Cohorts 152

    Kimberlee A. Shauman

    Explaining the Gender Wage Gap in STEM: Does Field Sex Composition Matter? 194

    Katherine Michelmore and Sharon Sassler

    Part IV. Marriage, Divorce, and Women’s Earnings

    Trends in Relative Earnings and Marital Dissolution: Are Wives Who Outearn Their Husbands Still More Likely to Divorce? 218

    Christine R. Schwartz and Pilar Gonalons-Pons

    Selection and Specialization in the Evolution of Marriage Earnings Gaps 237

    Chinhui Juhn and Kristin McCue

    Part V. Education, Work, and Political Participation

    Advances and Ambivalence: The Consequences of Women’s Educational and Workforce Changes for Women’s Political Participation in the United States, 1952 to 2012 272

    Ashley Jardina and Nancy Burns

     

  • Individual Author: Paulsell, Diane; Noyes, Jennifer L.; Selekman, Rebekah; Klein Vogel, Lisa; Sattar, Samina; Nerad, Benjamin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    In fall 2012, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) within the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration Project (CSPED) to identify effective approaches to enabling low-income noncustodial parents to pay their child support. OCSE competitively awarded grants to child support agencies in eight states to provide enhanced child support, employment, parenting, and case management services to noncustodial parents having difficulty meeting child support obligations. Grantees partnered with community organizations to deliver employment and parenting services. The Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and Mathematica Policy Research are conducting an evaluation of CSPED that includes an impact study, an implementation study, and a benefit-cost study. This report presents early implementation findings from the first two years of the demonstration. (Author abstract)

    In fall 2012, the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OCSE) within the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services launched the Child Support Noncustodial Parent Employment Demonstration Project (CSPED) to identify effective approaches to enabling low-income noncustodial parents to pay their child support. OCSE competitively awarded grants to child support agencies in eight states to provide enhanced child support, employment, parenting, and case management services to noncustodial parents having difficulty meeting child support obligations. Grantees partnered with community organizations to deliver employment and parenting services. The Institute for Research on Poverty at the University of Wisconsin and Mathematica Policy Research are conducting an evaluation of CSPED that includes an impact study, an implementation study, and a benefit-cost study. This report presents early implementation findings from the first two years of the demonstration. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Watson, Liz; Frohlich, Lauren; Johnston, Elizabeth
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    A new issue brief from the National Women’s Law Center, “Collateral Damage: Scheduling Challenges for Workers in Low-wage Jobs and Their Consequences” describes the range of difficult work schedules facing workers in low-wage jobs—lack of control over the timing of work hours, schedules that are assigned at the last minute, hours that fluctuate radically from week to week or month to month, involuntary part-time work, and nonstandard schedules. The issue brief explains the extent of these problems and their particular impact on women, who make up the majority of low-wage workers and also shoulder a disproportionate share of caregiving responsibilities. The issue brief also documents the fallout from challenging work schedules for workers and their families. (author abstract)

    A new issue brief from the National Women’s Law Center, “Collateral Damage: Scheduling Challenges for Workers in Low-wage Jobs and Their Consequences” describes the range of difficult work schedules facing workers in low-wage jobs—lack of control over the timing of work hours, schedules that are assigned at the last minute, hours that fluctuate radically from week to week or month to month, involuntary part-time work, and nonstandard schedules. The issue brief explains the extent of these problems and their particular impact on women, who make up the majority of low-wage workers and also shoulder a disproportionate share of caregiving responsibilities. The issue brief also documents the fallout from challenging work schedules for workers and their families. (author abstract)

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