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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: D’Amico, Ronald; Kim, Hui
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This report describes the impacts of re-entry programs developed by seven grantees that were awarded funds under the Second Chance Act (SCA) Adult Demonstration Program to reduce recidivism by addressing the challenges faced by adults returning to their communities after incarceration. In estimating impacts, the evaluation used a randomized controlled trial, whereby 966 individuals eligible for SCA were randomly assigned to either a program group whose members could participate in individualized SCA services. Each study participant was measured on a range of outcomes at 18 months after random assignment and again approximately one year later. An earlier report described impacts measured at 18 months. This report extends those results by describing the longer-term impacts and analyzing program costs. (Edited author abstract)

    This report describes the impacts of re-entry programs developed by seven grantees that were awarded funds under the Second Chance Act (SCA) Adult Demonstration Program to reduce recidivism by addressing the challenges faced by adults returning to their communities after incarceration. In estimating impacts, the evaluation used a randomized controlled trial, whereby 966 individuals eligible for SCA were randomly assigned to either a program group whose members could participate in individualized SCA services. Each study participant was measured on a range of outcomes at 18 months after random assignment and again approximately one year later. An earlier report described impacts measured at 18 months. This report extends those results by describing the longer-term impacts and analyzing program costs. (Edited author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bellotti, Jeanne; Sattar, Samina; Gould-Werth, Alix; Berk, Jillian; Gutierrez, Ivette; Stein, Jillian; Betesh, Hannah; Ochoa, Lindsay; Wiegand, Andrew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs. A complex array of factors including jail and local community characteristics influenced the development and operations of jail-based AJCs as well as the experiences and outcomes of participants (Figure ES.1). The overarching goals were to increase participants’ work readiness at the time of release, increase employment after release, and reduce recidivism; additional goals for the pilot initiative included demonstrating that corrections and workforce agencies could effectively collaborate to provide pre-release services, generate lessons learned around promising strategies and common challenges that could inform future efforts; and identify ways for grantees to sustain the jail-based AJCs...

    To help individuals successfully reenter society after time in jail, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) awarded $10 million in grants to 20 local workforce development boards (LWDBs) in June 2015 for the Linking to Employment Activities PreRelease (LEAP) initiative. Central to the LEAP initiative was creating jail-based American Job Centers (AJCs) with direct linkages to community-based AJCs. A complex array of factors including jail and local community characteristics influenced the development and operations of jail-based AJCs as well as the experiences and outcomes of participants (Figure ES.1). The overarching goals were to increase participants’ work readiness at the time of release, increase employment after release, and reduce recidivism; additional goals for the pilot initiative included demonstrating that corrections and workforce agencies could effectively collaborate to provide pre-release services, generate lessons learned around promising strategies and common challenges that could inform future efforts; and identify ways for grantees to sustain the jail-based AJCs when the DOL-funded grant ended. The grants covered 9 months of planning and 15 months of service delivery, with many grantees receiving up to a one-year no-cost extension to finish spending down remaining grant resources. Grantees were geographically diverse, located in 13 states across 5 DOL regions, and involved a total of 22 county jails.

    Workforce development, corrections, and other partners, as well as participants, identified many successes along with significant challenges and promising strategies to address them. The qualitative evidence collected through this implementation evaluation suggests that introducing new services, partnerships, and ways of thinking about reentry hold promise for lasting effects on the workforce and corrections systems in some sites. The experiences of the LEAP grantees highlight important lessons learned and some areas for continued refinement or potential replication in similar or different contexts. Although this implementation evaluation cannot make causal claims, the evidence suggests that it is possible to use jail-based AJCs to link participants to post-release services and that this may be a promising approach to support returning individuals in successful reentry. (Edited author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Fishman, Mike
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the findings from an implementation study of four separate training programs for long-term unemployed workers. This presentation discusses the policy context, evaluation overview, ready-to-work grantee programs, and key findings of the study.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS workshop summarizes the findings from an implementation study of four separate training programs for long-term unemployed workers. This presentation discusses the policy context, evaluation overview, ready-to-work grantee programs, and key findings of the study.

  • Individual Author: Martinson, Karin; Copson, Elizabeth; Schneider, Glen; Elkin, Sam; Sarfo, Bright; Kappil, Tresa; Ma, Claire; Morrison, Carly; Nakas, Audra
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    A key challenge facing policymakers and program administrators is how to develop effective strategies to help Americans facing economic challenges, particularly the long-term unemployed, to succeed in the labor market. During the deep recession of 2008-2009, an unprecedented number of workers lost their jobs and many remained under- or unemployed, even as the economy recovered. Identifying what strategies that can help them regain their economic footing has been a priority, with a particular interest in employment in higher-paying middle- and high-skill jobs that are in demand by American businesses.

    As part of this effort, in 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded the Ready to Work (RTW) Partnership grant program that is the focus of this report. RTW grants went to partnerships of workforce agencies, training providers, employers, and other organizations, to improve the employment prospects of the long-term unemployed by providing a range of customized services including training and job search assistance. The intent of the RTW grant program is to establish...

    A key challenge facing policymakers and program administrators is how to develop effective strategies to help Americans facing economic challenges, particularly the long-term unemployed, to succeed in the labor market. During the deep recession of 2008-2009, an unprecedented number of workers lost their jobs and many remained under- or unemployed, even as the economy recovered. Identifying what strategies that can help them regain their economic footing has been a priority, with a particular interest in employment in higher-paying middle- and high-skill jobs that are in demand by American businesses.

    As part of this effort, in 2014, the U.S. Department of Labor (DOL) funded the Ready to Work (RTW) Partnership grant program that is the focus of this report. RTW grants went to partnerships of workforce agencies, training providers, employers, and other organizations, to improve the employment prospects of the long-term unemployed by providing a range of customized services including training and job search assistance. The intent of the RTW grant program is to establish programs that might prove effective in preparing U.S. workers for employment, particularly in occupations and industries being filled by foreign workers through the H-1B visa program. In 2014, DOL awarded four-year grants totaling $170 million to 23 grantees, with individual awards ranging from $3 to $10 million.

    DOL's Employment and Training Administration, in collaboration with the Chief Evaluation Office, sponsored a rigorous evaluation of the RTW grant program. The evaluation includes an implementation and impact study and is being conducted by Abt Associates and its partner MEF Associates. In consultation with DOL, the evaluation team purposively selected four grantees for study based on their program design and scale.

    This report documents early findings from the evaluation's implementation study of the four grantees. For each grantee, the report describes the design and operation of its grant-funded program components, including staff guidance, occupational training, employment readiness and job search assistance, work-based training, and other services individualized to each participant's needs and skill gaps. The report also presents key findings related to the implementation and operation of the programs. Future reports will examine the effectiveness of the four grantee programs individually in improving participants' education and employment outcomes. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Loprest, Pamela; Holcomb, Pamela A.; Martinson, Karin; Zedlewski, Sheila R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This study examines states' approaches to serving TANF recipients facing multiple barriers to work in fall 2006. It also describes changes states anticipate (partly in response to TANF reauthorization) in the near future to help these recipients move into work and off the caseload. Study results are based primarily on structured interviews with state TANF program officials in 17 states including the states with the largest TANF caseloads. The findings highlight the different approaches taken by state TANF programs on how to best help recipients with serious barriers and provide early information on states' thinking on how their approach may change for this group in the future.(author abstract)

    This study examines states' approaches to serving TANF recipients facing multiple barriers to work in fall 2006. It also describes changes states anticipate (partly in response to TANF reauthorization) in the near future to help these recipients move into work and off the caseload. Study results are based primarily on structured interviews with state TANF program officials in 17 states including the states with the largest TANF caseloads. The findings highlight the different approaches taken by state TANF programs on how to best help recipients with serious barriers and provide early information on states' thinking on how their approach may change for this group in the future.(author abstract)

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