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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: McKernan, Signe-Mary; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Mills, Gregory B.; Pergamit, Mike; Braga, Breno
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Policymakers looking to provide evidence-based opportunity for Americans should look to matched savings programs, such as individual development accounts. By matching personal saving, individual development accounts (IDAs) improve financial capability while promoting saving for longer-term investment in a home, business or education. A randomized controlled trial evaluation of the federally supported Assets for Independence IDA program found that after one year, participants in the program saw a $657 median increase in new savings (before matching funds); a 34 percent reduction in reported economic hardship; and a 10 percent increase in participants’ confidence in their ability to meet normal monthly living expenses. (Author abstract)

    Policymakers looking to provide evidence-based opportunity for Americans should look to matched savings programs, such as individual development accounts. By matching personal saving, individual development accounts (IDAs) improve financial capability while promoting saving for longer-term investment in a home, business or education. A randomized controlled trial evaluation of the federally supported Assets for Independence IDA program found that after one year, participants in the program saw a $657 median increase in new savings (before matching funds); a 34 percent reduction in reported economic hardship; and a 10 percent increase in participants’ confidence in their ability to meet normal monthly living expenses. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cities for Financial Empowerment Fund
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report is a three-year evaluation of the Financial Empowerment Center initiative's replication in 5 cities (Denver, CO; Lansing, MI; Nashville, TN; Philadelphia, PA and San Antonio, TX). Financial Empowerment Centers (FECs) offer professional, one-on-one financial counseling as a free public service. The evaluation draws on data from 22,000 clients who participated in 57,000 counseling sessions across these first 5 city replication partners, and provides additional evidence of the program's success. (Author introduction)

    This report is a three-year evaluation of the Financial Empowerment Center initiative's replication in 5 cities (Denver, CO; Lansing, MI; Nashville, TN; Philadelphia, PA and San Antonio, TX). Financial Empowerment Centers (FECs) offer professional, one-on-one financial counseling as a free public service. The evaluation draws on data from 22,000 clients who participated in 57,000 counseling sessions across these first 5 city replication partners, and provides additional evidence of the program's success. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Schultz, Caroline; Elliot, Mark; McKernon, Signe-Mary; Lehman, Gretchen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) includes presentations of findings from three programs intended to promote financial empowerment. Panelists discussed the implications of these findings for policy and practice in expanding economic opportunity.

  • Individual Author: Mills, Gregory; Pergamit, Michael; McKerman, Signe-Mary; Braga, Breno; Ratcliffe, Caroline; Hahn, Heather; Edelstein, Sara; Elkin, Sam
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents first-year findings from an evaluation of the Assets for Independence (AFI) program at two sites — Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, NM and RISE Financial Pathways in Los Angeles, CA.

    Findings show that the AFI program increased low-income participants’ savings after one year. There is also evidence of a range of several beneficial secondary impacts, including reductions in material hardship and improvements in perceived financial well-being.

    This is the first evaluation of the AFI program to use a randomized controlled trial. The study assesses the program’s early effects on participants’ savings, asset ownership, and economic well-being. (Author abstract)

    This report presents first-year findings from an evaluation of the Assets for Independence (AFI) program at two sites — Central New Mexico Community College in Albuquerque, NM and RISE Financial Pathways in Los Angeles, CA.

    Findings show that the AFI program increased low-income participants’ savings after one year. There is also evidence of a range of several beneficial secondary impacts, including reductions in material hardship and improvements in perceived financial well-being.

    This is the first evaluation of the AFI program to use a randomized controlled trial. The study assesses the program’s early effects on participants’ savings, asset ownership, and economic well-being. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Peters, Clark M.; Sherraden, Margaret; Kuchinski, Ann Marie
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    The study reported in this article explores the role child welfare workers play in elevating the financial capability (FC) of foster youths transitioning to adulthood. It draws on an examination of Opportunity Passport, a component of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative, which operates across the United States. The authors held in-depth, structured interviews with eight staff and 38 current and former foster youths age 18 years and older in four sites across three states. Findings indicate that (a) program participants require professional financial assistance that is beyond the role of the traditional child welfare caseworker; (b) caseworkers who address FC in young adults face uncertainty in their roles; and (c) broader policies relevant to young adults transitioning to adulthood exhibit tension, if not conflict, regarding enhancing FC. The authors highlight the importance of expanding the role of caseworkers to incorporate elements of FC in serving the needs of foster youths. (Author abstract)

    The study reported in this article explores the role child welfare workers play in elevating the financial capability (FC) of foster youths transitioning to adulthood. It draws on an examination of Opportunity Passport, a component of the Jim Casey Youth Opportunities Initiative, which operates across the United States. The authors held in-depth, structured interviews with eight staff and 38 current and former foster youths age 18 years and older in four sites across three states. Findings indicate that (a) program participants require professional financial assistance that is beyond the role of the traditional child welfare caseworker; (b) caseworkers who address FC in young adults face uncertainty in their roles; and (c) broader policies relevant to young adults transitioning to adulthood exhibit tension, if not conflict, regarding enhancing FC. The authors highlight the importance of expanding the role of caseworkers to incorporate elements of FC in serving the needs of foster youths. (Author abstract)

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