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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: López, Michael ; Dobbins, Dionne ; Hepburn, Peter ; Sandstrom, Heather
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Publicly funded child care represents a critical work support for families, and is a key mechanism for supporting low-income families with a path to economic self-sufficiency. This session looked at how variations in community context (such as the availability of care, responsiveness to nonstandard work hours, and the unique experiences of Latino immigrants) might affect child care access. Michael López (Abt Associates) moderated this session. The presenters used a variety of different methodologies in their research.

     

    Publicly funded child care represents a critical work support for families, and is a key mechanism for supporting low-income families with a path to economic self-sufficiency. This session looked at how variations in community context (such as the availability of care, responsiveness to nonstandard work hours, and the unique experiences of Latino immigrants) might affect child care access. Michael López (Abt Associates) moderated this session. The presenters used a variety of different methodologies in their research.

     

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract...

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hill, Heather D.; Romich, Jennifer
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    In recent years, new national and regional minimum wage laws have been passed in the United States and other countries. The laws assume that benefits flow not only to workers but also to their children. Adolescent workers will most likely be affected directly given their concentration in low-paying jobs, but younger children may be affected indirectly by changes in parents' work conditions, family income, and the quality of nonparental child care. Research on minimum wages suggests modest and mixed economic effects: Decreases in employment can offset, partly or fully, wage increases, and modest reductions in poverty rates may fade over time. Few studies have examined the effects of minimum wage increases on the well-being of families, adults, and children. In this article, we use theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence concerning the effects on children of parental work and family income to suggest hypotheses about the effects of minimum wage increases on family life and children's well-being. (Author abstract)

    In recent years, new national and regional minimum wage laws have been passed in the United States and other countries. The laws assume that benefits flow not only to workers but also to their children. Adolescent workers will most likely be affected directly given their concentration in low-paying jobs, but younger children may be affected indirectly by changes in parents' work conditions, family income, and the quality of nonparental child care. Research on minimum wages suggests modest and mixed economic effects: Decreases in employment can offset, partly or fully, wage increases, and modest reductions in poverty rates may fade over time. Few studies have examined the effects of minimum wage increases on the well-being of families, adults, and children. In this article, we use theoretical frameworks and empirical evidence concerning the effects on children of parental work and family income to suggest hypotheses about the effects of minimum wage increases on family life and children's well-being. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Rohacek, Monica
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    Research and evaluation play an important role in supporting government agencies in making optimal policy, programmatic, and operational decisions. This tool is designed to support Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) lead agencies in strengthening their capacity to carry out and use research in decision-making. Divided into three parts, the tool guides users through a process of reflecting on:

    • their agency’s specific strengths and weaknesses within seven domains of organizational research capacity;
    • setting priorities for their capacity-building efforts; and
    • articulating outstanding questions the agency has about strengthening organizational research capacity.

    The content of the tool builds on unpublished reviews of literature on the topic of research capacity building and self-assessment and of CCDF Lead Agencies’ operational contexts and capacity-building needs. It represents a compilation of ideas and items drawn from several diagnostic tools developed for other purposes and target audiences, with modifications made to fit the needs...

    Research and evaluation play an important role in supporting government agencies in making optimal policy, programmatic, and operational decisions. This tool is designed to support Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) lead agencies in strengthening their capacity to carry out and use research in decision-making. Divided into three parts, the tool guides users through a process of reflecting on:

    • their agency’s specific strengths and weaknesses within seven domains of organizational research capacity;
    • setting priorities for their capacity-building efforts; and
    • articulating outstanding questions the agency has about strengthening organizational research capacity.

    The content of the tool builds on unpublished reviews of literature on the topic of research capacity building and self-assessment and of CCDF Lead Agencies’ operational contexts and capacity-building needs. It represents a compilation of ideas and items drawn from several diagnostic tools developed for other purposes and target audiences, with modifications made to fit the needs of CCDF Lead Agencies seeking a versatile tool that can be used for either quick reflection or for more in-depth self-assessment. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    In November 2014, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 was signed into law, reauthorizing the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)--the federal child care subsidy program--for the first time since 1996. In December 2015, the U.S. Office of Child Care issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which updated CCDF regulations in light of the CCDBG Act of 2014 and research that has been published since the passage of the original 1996 law. Included in the proposed rule are provisions to increase the supply and quality of child care during nontraditional hours. Nontraditional hours child care, often also referred to as nonstandard hours child care, has been defined as care provided outside of the standard working day, including during evening, overnight, and weekend hours. This Topic of Interest includes resources from the Research Connections collection on the supply of nonstandard hours child care, child care arrangements of parents working nonstandard hours, and access to child care subsidies of parents working nonstandard hours. (Author abstract)

    In November 2014, the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 was signed into law, reauthorizing the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF)--the federal child care subsidy program--for the first time since 1996. In December 2015, the U.S. Office of Child Care issued a Notice of Proposed Rulemaking, which updated CCDF regulations in light of the CCDBG Act of 2014 and research that has been published since the passage of the original 1996 law. Included in the proposed rule are provisions to increase the supply and quality of child care during nontraditional hours. Nontraditional hours child care, often also referred to as nonstandard hours child care, has been defined as care provided outside of the standard working day, including during evening, overnight, and weekend hours. This Topic of Interest includes resources from the Research Connections collection on the supply of nonstandard hours child care, child care arrangements of parents working nonstandard hours, and access to child care subsidies of parents working nonstandard hours. (Author abstract)

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