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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Child Care Aware of America
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minton, Sarah; Dunham, Christin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Child care subsidies provide assistance for low-income families, often to support work activities. Depending on the state of residence, families' out-of-pocket expenses can vary widely, both while receiving the subsidy and at the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. In this paper, we look at how state policies affect families' child care expenses, focusing on the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. We find that when families' incomes increase just enough to make them ineligible for child care assistance, the potential increase in out-of-pocket child care expenses can be much greater than the increase in income. (author abstract)

    Child care subsidies provide assistance for low-income families, often to support work activities. Depending on the state of residence, families' out-of-pocket expenses can vary widely, both while receiving the subsidy and at the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. In this paper, we look at how state policies affect families' child care expenses, focusing on the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. We find that when families' incomes increase just enough to make them ineligible for child care assistance, the potential increase in out-of-pocket child care expenses can be much greater than the increase in income. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Gennetian, Lisa; Morris, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This article contributes to the literature on parental self-sufficiency and child well-being in two ways. First, we bring a novel interdisciplinary perspective to formulating hypotheses about the pathways by which policy-induced changes in the environments in which children are embedded, both within and outside the home, facilitate or harm children’s development. These hypotheses help to organize the contradictory assertions regarding child impacts that have surrounded the debate over welfare reform. Second, we draw on a set of policy experiments to understand the effects of reforms targeting parents’ self-sufficiency on both parents and their children. The random-assignment design of these evaluations provides an unusually strong basis for identifying conditions under which policy-induced increases in employment among low-income and mostly single parents can help or hurt young children’s achievement. (Author introduction)

    This article contributes to the literature on parental self-sufficiency and child well-being in two ways. First, we bring a novel interdisciplinary perspective to formulating hypotheses about the pathways by which policy-induced changes in the environments in which children are embedded, both within and outside the home, facilitate or harm children’s development. These hypotheses help to organize the contradictory assertions regarding child impacts that have surrounded the debate over welfare reform. Second, we draw on a set of policy experiments to understand the effects of reforms targeting parents’ self-sufficiency on both parents and their children. The random-assignment design of these evaluations provides an unusually strong basis for identifying conditions under which policy-induced increases in employment among low-income and mostly single parents can help or hurt young children’s achievement. (Author introduction)

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