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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Child Care Aware of America
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

    More than 11 million children younger than age five are in some form of child care in the United States. The Parents and the High Cost of Child Care: 2016 Report summarizes the cost of child care across the country, examines the importance of child care as a workforce support and as an early learning program, and explores the effect of high costs on families' child care options. This year's report continues to expose child care as one of the most significant expenses in a family budget, often exceeding the cost of housing, college tuition, transportation, or food. In addition to our review of the average cost of care across the nation, Child Care Aware® of America examined county-level data in four states. We also provide a comprehensive set of solutions and policy recommendations to help address the high cost of child care for families across the country. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Forry, Nicole; Isner, Tabitha K.; Daneri, Maria P.; Tout, Kathryn
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Few studies have described parents’ child care decision-making process, yet understanding how parents make child care choices is fundamental to developing effective services to promote the selection of high-quality care. This study used latent profile analysis to distinguish subgroups of low-income parents identified as having commonalities in the number of options, duration, and sources of information sought as part of their child care decision-making process. Study participants included 260 parents who participated in the baseline wave of the Minnesota Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal phone survey of welfare applicants. Two subgroups of parents were identified. The majority of parents (82%) made choices within 2 weeks and considered on average 2 arrangements. Fewer than half of these parents considered information from experts, public lists, or family members/friends when making a child care choice. The remaining 18% of the sample took on average 11 weeks to make a child care choice, considered on average 3 options, and relied more heavily on information from experts...

    Few studies have described parents’ child care decision-making process, yet understanding how parents make child care choices is fundamental to developing effective services to promote the selection of high-quality care. This study used latent profile analysis to distinguish subgroups of low-income parents identified as having commonalities in the number of options, duration, and sources of information sought as part of their child care decision-making process. Study participants included 260 parents who participated in the baseline wave of the Minnesota Child Care Choices study, a longitudinal phone survey of welfare applicants. Two subgroups of parents were identified. The majority of parents (82%) made choices within 2 weeks and considered on average 2 arrangements. Fewer than half of these parents considered information from experts, public lists, or family members/friends when making a child care choice. The remaining 18% of the sample took on average 11 weeks to make a child care choice, considered on average 3 options, and relied more heavily on information from experts and family members/friends. Practice or Policy: Findings from this study have implications for the marketing of resource and referral counseling services, Quality Rating and Improvement Systems, and consumer education aimed at facilitating the selection of high-quality care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Davis, Elizabeth E.; Carlin, Caroline S.; Krafft, Caroline; Tout, Kathryn
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    Instability in child care arrangements can negatively affect children's development, especially in low-income families. However, few studies have examined what predicts changes over time in child care arrangements. This paper presents findings from a unique multiyear study tracking child care use in low-income families. We estimate rich quantitative models to analyze the relationships among child, household, and care provider characteristics and four different types of changes. We find turnover in child care arrangements to be common in this low-income population. Over a period of six months, half of the children changed primary provider. Child care changes were frequently related to job loss, changes in family composition, or the changing availability of caregivers. While concerns have been raised that short spells of child care subsidy receipt cause child care instability, we found that subsidy use was not associated with higher rates of change. In addition, we found that the lower a parent's assessment of the child's experience in a particular arrangement in the prior time...

    Instability in child care arrangements can negatively affect children's development, especially in low-income families. However, few studies have examined what predicts changes over time in child care arrangements. This paper presents findings from a unique multiyear study tracking child care use in low-income families. We estimate rich quantitative models to analyze the relationships among child, household, and care provider characteristics and four different types of changes. We find turnover in child care arrangements to be common in this low-income population. Over a period of six months, half of the children changed primary provider. Child care changes were frequently related to job loss, changes in family composition, or the changing availability of caregivers. While concerns have been raised that short spells of child care subsidy receipt cause child care instability, we found that subsidy use was not associated with higher rates of change. In addition, we found that the lower a parent's assessment of the child's experience in a particular arrangement in the prior time period, the higher the likelihood of changing providers by the next survey wave. These results indicate that low-income parents recognize quality factors and change arrangements to improve the quality of care. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Blasberg, Amy ; Forry, Nicole ; Tout, Kathryn ; Carlin, Caroline ; Davis, Elizabeth ; Isner, Tabitha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2011

    One of the aims of the Minnesota Child Care Choices study is to explore the factors that influence child care stability and parents’ employment outcomes. This Research Brief looks at the work experiences of parents in the study and the connections between child care and work. In particular, this Research Brief explores how problems with child care affect—and in some cases disrupt—parents’ work.

    While the entire sample consists of 323 parents, this brief focuses on a few different sub-samples. The first is the group of respondents who report working for pay in the past week (N=136). The second is the group of respondents who are considered to be labor force participants (N=282). The last group is respondents who report experiencing problems with their child care over the past four months that have caused them to make alternative child care arrangements, regardless of employment or labor force participation status in the week leading up to the survey (N=102). (author abstract)

    One of the aims of the Minnesota Child Care Choices study is to explore the factors that influence child care stability and parents’ employment outcomes. This Research Brief looks at the work experiences of parents in the study and the connections between child care and work. In particular, this Research Brief explores how problems with child care affect—and in some cases disrupt—parents’ work.

    While the entire sample consists of 323 parents, this brief focuses on a few different sub-samples. The first is the group of respondents who report working for pay in the past week (N=136). The second is the group of respondents who are considered to be labor force participants (N=282). The last group is respondents who report experiencing problems with their child care over the past four months that have caused them to make alternative child care arrangements, regardless of employment or labor force participation status in the week leading up to the survey (N=102). (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Duncan, Greg J.; Gennetian, Lisa; Morris, Pamela
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    This article contributes to the literature on parental self-sufficiency and child well-being in two ways. First, we bring a novel interdisciplinary perspective to formulating hypotheses about the pathways by which policy-induced changes in the environments in which children are embedded, both within and outside the home, facilitate or harm children’s development. These hypotheses help to organize the contradictory assertions regarding child impacts that have surrounded the debate over welfare reform. Second, we draw on a set of policy experiments to understand the effects of reforms targeting parents’ self-sufficiency on both parents and their children. The random-assignment design of these evaluations provides an unusually strong basis for identifying conditions under which policy-induced increases in employment among low-income and mostly single parents can help or hurt young children’s achievement. (Author introduction)

    This article contributes to the literature on parental self-sufficiency and child well-being in two ways. First, we bring a novel interdisciplinary perspective to formulating hypotheses about the pathways by which policy-induced changes in the environments in which children are embedded, both within and outside the home, facilitate or harm children’s development. These hypotheses help to organize the contradictory assertions regarding child impacts that have surrounded the debate over welfare reform. Second, we draw on a set of policy experiments to understand the effects of reforms targeting parents’ self-sufficiency on both parents and their children. The random-assignment design of these evaluations provides an unusually strong basis for identifying conditions under which policy-induced increases in employment among low-income and mostly single parents can help or hurt young children’s achievement. (Author introduction)

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