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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Moreno, Manuel H.; Toros, Halil; Stevens, Max; Doan, Duc; Salem, Nancy; Beardsley, Julie
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2007

    The present study is a by-product of DPSS’ ongoing commitment to making child care services available to Los Angeles County’s Welfare-to-Work participants. For some time now, policymakers have attempted to understand why a large proportion of Welfare-to-Work participants fail to use the child care services available to them. This report identifies two major barriers to utilization: participant difficulty in establishing eligibility for child care services, and participant inability to gain approval for the child care requests they submit to Alternative Payment Program (APP) agencies. The research presented in this report indicates that significant proportions of CalWORKs participants have difficulties opening Welfare-to-Work components in the initial stages of their tenure in the program. The difficulties are likely related to a number of personal and program-level barriers. It will not be possible to fully grasp these initial barriers without conducting additional qualitative research. Nevertheless, participants who cannot attend program components are not able to make requests...

    The present study is a by-product of DPSS’ ongoing commitment to making child care services available to Los Angeles County’s Welfare-to-Work participants. For some time now, policymakers have attempted to understand why a large proportion of Welfare-to-Work participants fail to use the child care services available to them. This report identifies two major barriers to utilization: participant difficulty in establishing eligibility for child care services, and participant inability to gain approval for the child care requests they submit to Alternative Payment Program (APP) agencies. The research presented in this report indicates that significant proportions of CalWORKs participants have difficulties opening Welfare-to-Work components in the initial stages of their tenure in the program. The difficulties are likely related to a number of personal and program-level barriers. It will not be possible to fully grasp these initial barriers without conducting additional qualitative research. Nevertheless, participants who cannot attend program components are not able to make requests for child care services. Some participants may attempt to make these requests with no open component, but their eligibility for child care is nullified unless they are working or until they can take the steps necessary to move back into compliance with program requirements. Moreover, significant numbers of participants eligible for child care have the requests they make for services denied for various reasons that are examined in this report. At the same time, this report also shows that early establishment of eligibility dramatically increases the likelihood that participants will utilize the child care services available to them through the GAIN program. In turn, early eligibility appears to increase the likelihood that participants will remain in GAIN and make positive strides towards self-sufficiency.

    The findings in these pages, which are based on data collected from DPSS administrative records, were generated using three substantive modes of analysis, each of which occupies a substantive section in the report. Section I examines child care eligibility and utilization trends by looking at monthly snapshots. Section II tracks two different GAIN entry cohorts and creates a more dynamic understanding of eligibility and utilization issues through an analysis of the cumulative child care histories of GAIN participants. Section III uses regression models to demonstrate factors contributing to outcomes such as child care eligibility, child care utilization, and the denial of requests for child care services. The concluding section of the report summarizes the findings and offers a series of recommendations for policy enhancements that could improve the delivery of child care services to the participants who need them. Increasing participant access to child care will be a crucial part of the more general effort to continue making improvements in the CalWORKs program as welfare reform enters its second decade. It is our sincere hope that the findings presented in this report will provide valuable guidance in this direction. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Henly, Julia R.; Lyons, Sandra
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    Low-income working mothers face significant child care challenges. These challenges are particularly salient in an era of welfare reform, when welfare recipients are under increased pressure to find a job. The current study examines how child care demands are negotiated for an urban sample of low-income mothers. The sample includes a racially and ethnically diverse group of 57 respondents with and without welfare experience who are mothering children under 13 years of age and working in entry-level jobs. Findings suggest that respondents seek arrangements that are affordable, convenient, and safe, and informal arrangements may be most compatible with convenience and cost considerations. Informal care is not universally available, however, and may be less reliable. Implications for child care policy are discussed. (author abstract)

    Low-income working mothers face significant child care challenges. These challenges are particularly salient in an era of welfare reform, when welfare recipients are under increased pressure to find a job. The current study examines how child care demands are negotiated for an urban sample of low-income mothers. The sample includes a racially and ethnically diverse group of 57 respondents with and without welfare experience who are mothering children under 13 years of age and working in entry-level jobs. Findings suggest that respondents seek arrangements that are affordable, convenient, and safe, and informal arrangements may be most compatible with convenience and cost considerations. Informal care is not universally available, however, and may be less reliable. Implications for child care policy are discussed. (author abstract)