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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: White Papers
    Year: 2017

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List provides a comprehensive list of city universal preschool initiative evaluations and research in the Research Connections collection. To count as universal, a city's program must aim to eventually provide universal access to publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds using at least some city funds, even if it does not currently achieve universal access. Some well-known programs do not meet these criteria, either because they are the city-based implementation of a state universal preschool program (Tulsa, Oklahoma) or because they do not aim for universal access (Chicago's Child-Parent Centers; Salt Lake City, Utah). Cities with universal preschool programs were identified in recent reviews by the American Institutes for Research and the Rand Corporation, as well as in news reports. A number of city programs have not produced evaluations or research publications or are still in the planning or early implementation stages, including Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington; and West...

    This Research-to-Policy Resource List provides a comprehensive list of city universal preschool initiative evaluations and research in the Research Connections collection. To count as universal, a city's program must aim to eventually provide universal access to publicly-funded preschool for all four-year-olds using at least some city funds, even if it does not currently achieve universal access. Some well-known programs do not meet these criteria, either because they are the city-based implementation of a state universal preschool program (Tulsa, Oklahoma) or because they do not aim for universal access (Chicago's Child-Parent Centers; Salt Lake City, Utah). Cities with universal preschool programs were identified in recent reviews by the American Institutes for Research and the Rand Corporation, as well as in news reports. A number of city programs have not produced evaluations or research publications or are still in the planning or early implementation stages, including Cincinnati, Ohio; Cleveland, Ohio; Dayton, Ohio; Santa Fe, New Mexico; Seattle, Washington; and West Sacramento, California. The city universal preschool initiatives that have produced research or evaluation publications and are included here are: Boston, Massachusetts; Denver, Colorado; Los Angeles, California; New York, New York; Philadelphia, Pennsylvania; San Antonio, Texas; San Francisco, California; and Washington, District of Columbia. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Greenberg, Erica; Adams, Gina; Michie, Molly
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report explores the barriers to preschool participation faced by low-income immigrant families in Silicon Valley. Findings emerge from interviews and meetings with experts and stakeholders from early childhood and immigrant-serving organizations in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, and from a systematic review of existing reports and data. Several of the identified barriers are common among low-income families broadly, while others pose unique challenges to low-income immigrant families. Respondents suggest several strategies to overcome these barriers and several potential partner organizations that are well-positioned to support these efforts. (Author abstract)

    This report explores the barriers to preschool participation faced by low-income immigrant families in Silicon Valley. Findings emerge from interviews and meetings with experts and stakeholders from early childhood and immigrant-serving organizations in San Mateo and Santa Clara Counties, and from a systematic review of existing reports and data. Several of the identified barriers are common among low-income families broadly, while others pose unique challenges to low-income immigrant families. Respondents suggest several strategies to overcome these barriers and several potential partner organizations that are well-positioned to support these efforts. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Dechausay, Nadine; Richburg-Hayes, Lashawn; Farrell, Mary; Hall, Crystal; Schmitt, Emily
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2016

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) reviews findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project as well as lessons learned and next steps for this work. The BIAS portfolio included initiatives in the domains of work supports, child support, and child care.

    This video from the 2016 Research and Evaluation Conference on Self-Sufficiency (RECS) reviews findings from the Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency (BIAS) project as well as lessons learned and next steps for this work. The BIAS portfolio included initiatives in the domains of work supports, child support, and child care.

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Cleo Jacobs; Boller, Kimberly; Young, Madeline; Thomas, Jaime; Gonzalez, Daisy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This brief presents findings on informal caregivers’ and parents’ networks, focusing on child care arrangements and sources of support and information related to caregiv­ing from a small sample of informal caregiv­ers and parents in California’s Bay Area. It uses ecomapping, a method to create a graphic representation of an individual or family and the web of connections to people and institutions that make up their social support system, to illustrate the caregiver networks. This is the second in a series of three issue briefs  for the Informal Caregivers Research Project, conducted by Mathematica and funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s Children, Families, and Communities (CFC) program. (author abstract)

    This brief presents findings on informal caregivers’ and parents’ networks, focusing on child care arrangements and sources of support and information related to caregiv­ing from a small sample of informal caregiv­ers and parents in California’s Bay Area. It uses ecomapping, a method to create a graphic representation of an individual or family and the web of connections to people and institutions that make up their social support system, to illustrate the caregiver networks. This is the second in a series of three issue briefs  for the Informal Caregivers Research Project, conducted by Mathematica and funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s Children, Families, and Communities (CFC) program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Minton, Sarah; Dunham, Christin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    Child care subsidies provide assistance for low-income families, often to support work activities. Depending on the state of residence, families' out-of-pocket expenses can vary widely, both while receiving the subsidy and at the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. In this paper, we look at how state policies affect families' child care expenses, focusing on the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. We find that when families' incomes increase just enough to make them ineligible for child care assistance, the potential increase in out-of-pocket child care expenses can be much greater than the increase in income. (author abstract)

    Child care subsidies provide assistance for low-income families, often to support work activities. Depending on the state of residence, families' out-of-pocket expenses can vary widely, both while receiving the subsidy and at the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. In this paper, we look at how state policies affect families' child care expenses, focusing on the point when families no longer qualify for assistance. We find that when families' incomes increase just enough to make them ineligible for child care assistance, the potential increase in out-of-pocket child care expenses can be much greater than the increase in income. (author abstract)

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