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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine; Minton,Sarah
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she get government help, or a subsidy, to pay for child care? What if she lost her job and needs child care while she hunts for a new one? If she is eligible for a subsidy, how much will the government pay, and how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to all of those questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances:

    • the ages of the children
    • the number of people in the family
    • income
    • where they live

    Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for...

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she get government help, or a subsidy, to pay for child care? What if she lost her job and needs child care while she hunts for a new one? If she is eligible for a subsidy, how much will the government pay, and how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to all of those questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances:

    • the ages of the children
    • the number of people in the family
    • income
    • where they live

    Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kalil, Ariel
    Reference Type: Conference Paper, Report
    Year: 2017

    This article presents a brief overview of gaps by family income in some important child development outcomes. I argue that a big part of the mechanism in linking poverty to child development outcomes works through differences by family background in parenting, and I review efforts to narrow gaps in how parents interact with their children by family income. Finally, I describe my current research project, which draws on behavioral economics for insight into how parents make decisions about investing time with their children, how that process might differ by family background, and what promise those findings might hold for intervention efforts. (author introduction)

    This article presents a brief overview of gaps by family income in some important child development outcomes. I argue that a big part of the mechanism in linking poverty to child development outcomes works through differences by family background in parenting, and I review efforts to narrow gaps in how parents interact with their children by family income. Finally, I describe my current research project, which draws on behavioral economics for insight into how parents make decisions about investing time with their children, how that process might differ by family background, and what promise those findings might hold for intervention efforts. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Skinner, Christine; Cook, Kay; Sinclair, Sarah
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    This paper assesses the contribution that child support makes to Australian lone mothers' income packages and the proportion lifted out of poverty as a result. Using the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) dataset, we compare the results to a study conducted in the UK. Child support payments were more likely to be received in Australia and, when received, payments reduced lone mothers' poverty rate by 21 per cent, a greater extent than in the UK. These findings provide important insights for Australia and the UK where debates continue about the configuration of the system and enforcement mechanisms. (Author abstract)

    This paper assesses the contribution that child support makes to Australian lone mothers' income packages and the proportion lifted out of poverty as a result. Using the Household Income and Labour Dynamics in Australia (HILDA) dataset, we compare the results to a study conducted in the UK. Child support payments were more likely to be received in Australia and, when received, payments reduced lone mothers' poverty rate by 21 per cent, a greater extent than in the UK. These findings provide important insights for Australia and the UK where debates continue about the configuration of the system and enforcement mechanisms. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cozzolino, Elizabeth; Williams, Christine L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Despite increased spending on child support enforcement in the United States over the past 30 years, child support collections remain around 40 percent. Child support is a gendered phenomenon, typically involving a transfer of funds from noncustodial fathers to custodial mothers in most cases. We argue that new norms of separated fatherhood and motherhood may contribute to low rates of child support compliance. An analysis of 21 in-depth interviews with members of separated families about the meaning of child support payments reveals two controlling images of gendered parenting—the child support queen and the disappointing dad—that hold single mothers responsible for children’s economic as well as emotional well-being and evaluate separated fathers mostly on their emotional involvement with children. Because these gendered expectations downplay the importance of noncustodial fathers’ financial contributions and question custodial mothers’ entitlement to receive child support, they reinforce gender inequality in separated families and may contribute to low rates of child support...

    Despite increased spending on child support enforcement in the United States over the past 30 years, child support collections remain around 40 percent. Child support is a gendered phenomenon, typically involving a transfer of funds from noncustodial fathers to custodial mothers in most cases. We argue that new norms of separated fatherhood and motherhood may contribute to low rates of child support compliance. An analysis of 21 in-depth interviews with members of separated families about the meaning of child support payments reveals two controlling images of gendered parenting—the child support queen and the disappointing dad—that hold single mothers responsible for children’s economic as well as emotional well-being and evaluate separated fathers mostly on their emotional involvement with children. Because these gendered expectations downplay the importance of noncustodial fathers’ financial contributions and question custodial mothers’ entitlement to receive child support, they reinforce gender inequality in separated families and may contribute to low rates of child support collection. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

     In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, our instrumental variables estimates suggest that children receiving subsidized child care in the year before kindergarten score lower on tests of cognitive ability and reveal more behavior problems throughout kindergarten. An auxiliary analysis of longer-run outcomes shows that these negative effects largely disappear by the time children finish first grade. (author abstract)

     In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, our instrumental variables estimates suggest that children receiving subsidized child care in the year before kindergarten score lower on tests of cognitive ability and reveal more behavior problems throughout kindergarten. An auxiliary analysis of longer-run outcomes shows that these negative effects largely disappear by the time children finish first grade. (author abstract)

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