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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria; Meyer, Daniel R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    We argue that child support, the central program specifically targeting single-parent families, should increase financial resources for children living with a single parent, with a secondary goal of holding parents responsible for supporting their children. Current child support policy is substantially successful for divorcing families in which the noncustodial parent has at least moderate formal earnings. However, the system does not work well for lower-income families, especially unmarried couples: far too few children regularly receive substantial support and the system is sometimes counterproductive to encouraging parental responsibility. We propose: a public guarantee of a minimum amount of support per child, assurances that no noncustodial parent will be charged beyond their current means, and a broadening of child support services. (Author abstract)

    We argue that child support, the central program specifically targeting single-parent families, should increase financial resources for children living with a single parent, with a secondary goal of holding parents responsible for supporting their children. Current child support policy is substantially successful for divorcing families in which the noncustodial parent has at least moderate formal earnings. However, the system does not work well for lower-income families, especially unmarried couples: far too few children regularly receive substantial support and the system is sometimes counterproductive to encouraging parental responsibility. We propose: a public guarantee of a minimum amount of support per child, assurances that no noncustodial parent will be charged beyond their current means, and a broadening of child support services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Winship, Scott; Reeves, Richard V.; Guyot, Katherine
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Black Americans born poor are much less likely to move up the income ladder than those in other racial groups, especially whites. Why? Many factors are at work, including educational inequalities, neighborhood effects, workplace discrimination, parenting, access to credit, rates of incarceration, and so on. In a new paper, the authors confirm the stark differences in upward earnings mobility for black men compared to both black women and whites. They also confirm that black women, despite their solid earnings mobility, have very low family income mobility. They then estimate the impact of racial differences in marriage rates by simulating higher marriage rates among black women and find no significant effects. (Edited author introduction)

    Black Americans born poor are much less likely to move up the income ladder than those in other racial groups, especially whites. Why? Many factors are at work, including educational inequalities, neighborhood effects, workplace discrimination, parenting, access to credit, rates of incarceration, and so on. In a new paper, the authors confirm the stark differences in upward earnings mobility for black men compared to both black women and whites. They also confirm that black women, despite their solid earnings mobility, have very low family income mobility. They then estimate the impact of racial differences in marriage rates by simulating higher marriage rates among black women and find no significant effects. (Edited author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Demyan, Natalie; Passarella, Letitia Logan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Using the sample of orders from Maryland’s 2011 to 2014 guidelines review, this brief analyzes data regarding payments made during the first year after order establishment or modification. We answer the following research questions:

    1. Did orders that deviated from the guidelines experience higher payment compliance than orders that did not deviate?

    2. Did the reasons for deviations have an effect on payment compliance?

    We also explore obligor income as it relates to both deviations and payment compliance. Families with higher incomes were more likely to receive a deviation from the guidelines, and obligors with higher incomes also had a higher level of payment compliance (Hall, Demyan, & Passarella, 2016; Saunders, Passarella, & Born, 2014). Therefore, we also investigate whether obligors who received a deviation had different payment compliance outcomes compared to obligors who did not receive a deviation, even if both groups of obligors had similar incomes. (Edited author introduction)

     

    Using the sample of orders from Maryland’s 2011 to 2014 guidelines review, this brief analyzes data regarding payments made during the first year after order establishment or modification. We answer the following research questions:

    1. Did orders that deviated from the guidelines experience higher payment compliance than orders that did not deviate?

    2. Did the reasons for deviations have an effect on payment compliance?

    We also explore obligor income as it relates to both deviations and payment compliance. Families with higher incomes were more likely to receive a deviation from the guidelines, and obligors with higher incomes also had a higher level of payment compliance (Hall, Demyan, & Passarella, 2016; Saunders, Passarella, & Born, 2014). Therefore, we also investigate whether obligors who received a deviation had different payment compliance outcomes compared to obligors who did not receive a deviation, even if both groups of obligors had similar incomes. (Edited author introduction)

     

  • Individual Author: Stevens, Kathryn; Blatt, Lorraine; Minton,Sarah
    Reference Type: Report, Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she get government help, or a subsidy, to pay for child care? What if she lost her job and needs child care while she hunts for a new one? If she is eligible for a subsidy, how much will the government pay, and how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to all of those questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances:

    • the ages of the children
    • the number of people in the family
    • income
    • where they live

    Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for...

    If a single mother earns $25,000 per year, can she get government help, or a subsidy, to pay for child care? What if she lost her job and needs child care while she hunts for a new one? If she is eligible for a subsidy, how much will the government pay, and how much will she have to pay out of pocket? The answers to all of those questions depend on a family’s exact circumstances:

    • the ages of the children
    • the number of people in the family
    • income
    • where they live

    Child care subsidies are provided through a federal block grant program called the Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF). CCDF provides funding to the States, Territories, and Tribes. Within the federal guidelines, States/Territories establish many of the detailed policies used to operate their CCDF programs. This brief provides a graphic overview of some of the CCDF policy differences across States/Territories. It includes information about eligibility requirements; family application, terms of authorization, and redetermination; family payments; and policies for providers. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Kalil, Ariel
    Reference Type: Conference Paper, Report
    Year: 2017

    This article presents a brief overview of gaps by family income in some important child development outcomes. I argue that a big part of the mechanism in linking poverty to child development outcomes works through differences by family background in parenting, and I review efforts to narrow gaps in how parents interact with their children by family income. Finally, I describe my current research project, which draws on behavioral economics for insight into how parents make decisions about investing time with their children, how that process might differ by family background, and what promise those findings might hold for intervention efforts. (author introduction)

    This article presents a brief overview of gaps by family income in some important child development outcomes. I argue that a big part of the mechanism in linking poverty to child development outcomes works through differences by family background in parenting, and I review efforts to narrow gaps in how parents interact with their children by family income. Finally, I describe my current research project, which draws on behavioral economics for insight into how parents make decisions about investing time with their children, how that process might differ by family background, and what promise those findings might hold for intervention efforts. (author introduction)

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