Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Calloway, Erik; Gundersen, Craig; Henchy, Geraldine; Abdi, Fadumo
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the transcript from Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the transcript from Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children? Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The PowerPoint presentation from the webinar can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Calloway, Erik; Gundersen, Craig; Henchy, Geraldine; Abdi, Fadumo
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the Webinar Q&A from Childhood Obesity: What Are the...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This document is the Webinar Q&A from Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children? Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The Webinar transcript can be found here. The PowerPoint presentation from the Webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Calloway, Erik; Gundersen, Craig; Henchy, Geraldine; Abdi, Fadumo
    Reference Type: SSRC Products
    Year: 2018

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from the webinar. Listen to the recording...

    The Self-Sufficiency Research Clearinghouse (SSRC) sponsored a webinar on childhood obesity, Childhood Obesity: What Are the Options for Low-Income School-Aged Children?, on January 3, 2018 at 2:00 p.m. EST. This webinar focused on childhood obesity through the lens of social equity. It also discussed food environment, including natural and built environments, to highlight circumstances underpinning differences in obesity rates between children in different socioeconomic statuses and from different racial and ethnic backgrounds. During the free webinar, Dr. Craig Gundersen discussed the impact of food assistance programs available to low-income children and their families in the home and at school. Erik Calloway focused on the built environment of neighborhood factors impacting childhood obesity across various socioeconomic statuses. Finally, Geraldine Henchy closed with a discussion of the present and future of federal and state level efforts to reduce and prevent childhood obesity.

    This is the PowerPoint presentation from the webinar. Listen to the recording from the Webinar here. The webinar transcript can be found here. A record of the question and answer session from the webinar can be found here.

  • Individual Author: Hicks, Andrew L. ; Handcock, Mark S. ; Sastry, Narayan ; Pebley, Anne R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Prior research has suggested that children living in a disadvantaged neighborhood have lower achievement test scores, but these studies typically have not estimated causal effects that account for neighborhood choice. Recent studies used propensity score methods to account for the endogeneity of neighborhood exposures, comparing disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged neighborhoods. We develop an alternative propensity function approach in which cumulative neighborhood effects are modeled as a continuous treatment variable. This approach offers several advantages. We use our approach to examine the cumulative effects of neighborhood disadvantage on reading and math test scores in Los Angeles. Our substantive results indicate that recency of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods may be more important than average exposure for children’s test scores. We conclude that studies of child development should consider both average cumulative neighborhood exposure and the timing of this exposure. (Author abstract)

     

    Prior research has suggested that children living in a disadvantaged neighborhood have lower achievement test scores, but these studies typically have not estimated causal effects that account for neighborhood choice. Recent studies used propensity score methods to account for the endogeneity of neighborhood exposures, comparing disadvantaged and nondisadvantaged neighborhoods. We develop an alternative propensity function approach in which cumulative neighborhood effects are modeled as a continuous treatment variable. This approach offers several advantages. We use our approach to examine the cumulative effects of neighborhood disadvantage on reading and math test scores in Los Angeles. Our substantive results indicate that recency of exposure to disadvantaged neighborhoods may be more important than average exposure for children’s test scores. We conclude that studies of child development should consider both average cumulative neighborhood exposure and the timing of this exposure. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Blagg, Kristin; Chingos, Matthew; Corcoran, Sean P.; Cordes, Sarah A.; Cowen, Joshua; Denice, Patrick ; Gross, Betheny; Lincove, Jane Arnold ; Sattin-Bajaj, Carolyn; Schwartz, Amy Ellen; Valant, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    How to get to school is an important issue for families who want to send their children to schools outside their neighborhood and for education policymakers seeking to implement school choice policies that mitigate educational inequality. We analyze travel times between the homes and schools of nearly 190,000 students across five large US cities that offer a significant amount of educational choice:  Denver, Detroit, New Orleans, New York City, and Washington, DC. We find: 

    • Despite wide variation across cities in student transportation policy, there are similar student transportation patterns across our cities. Most students live within a 20-minute drive from home to their school. Older students travel farther to school than younger students, and black students travel farther than white or Hispanic students. Students who are not low income tend to travel farther than their low-income peers.
    • Particularly among older students, those enrolled in traditional public schools tend to travel as far, or in some cases farther, than those attending charter schools....

    How to get to school is an important issue for families who want to send their children to schools outside their neighborhood and for education policymakers seeking to implement school choice policies that mitigate educational inequality. We analyze travel times between the homes and schools of nearly 190,000 students across five large US cities that offer a significant amount of educational choice:  Denver, Detroit, New Orleans, New York City, and Washington, DC. We find: 

    • Despite wide variation across cities in student transportation policy, there are similar student transportation patterns across our cities. Most students live within a 20-minute drive from home to their school. Older students travel farther to school than younger students, and black students travel farther than white or Hispanic students. Students who are not low income tend to travel farther than their low-income peers.
    • Particularly among older students, those enrolled in traditional public schools tend to travel as far, or in some cases farther, than those attending charter schools.
    • Access to “high quality” high schools varies across cities, race and ethnicity, and on the quality measure used. However, ninth-grade students, on average, tend to live about a 10-minute drive from a “high quality” high school.
    • Access to a car can significantly increase the number of schools available to a family. Typical travel times to school by public transit are significantly greater than by car, especially in cities with less efficient transit networks.

    Just as there are inequalities and differences in students’ academic performance across these cities, we see parallel inequalities and differences in the distances that students travel and in the availability of nearby school options. Experiments in targeted policy interventions, such as implementing transportation vouchers for low-income parents of very young students, using yellow buses on circulating routes, or changing the way that school siting decisions are made, might yield pragmatic solutions that further level the playing field for a city’s most disadvantaged students. (Author abstract) 

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1946 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations