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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Pilkauskas, Natasha V.; Dunifon, Rachel E.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

    Using data from the Year 9 Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N ~ 3,182), we investigated the characteristics grandfamilies (grandparents raising their grandchildren with no parent present, N = 84) and compared them to other key groups, including children's nonresident parents and other economically disadvantaged families with children. Results show that grandparents raising their grandchildren were generally better off in terms of educational attainment, marital status, and economic well-being than the child's parents. Grandparents raising their grandchildren also had characteristics very similar to other disadvantaged mothers. Academic and socioemotional well-being were poorer among children in grandfamilies compared with those living with their mothers, but parenting practices were very similar. These findings suggest that although children in grandfamilies may be at a disadvantage academically and socioemotionally, grandparent caregivers are in many ways similar to other fragile-family mothers. Overall, this study enhances our knowledge of an important yet...

    Using data from the Year 9 Fragile Families and Child Wellbeing Study (N ~ 3,182), we investigated the characteristics grandfamilies (grandparents raising their grandchildren with no parent present, N = 84) and compared them to other key groups, including children's nonresident parents and other economically disadvantaged families with children. Results show that grandparents raising their grandchildren were generally better off in terms of educational attainment, marital status, and economic well-being than the child's parents. Grandparents raising their grandchildren also had characteristics very similar to other disadvantaged mothers. Academic and socioemotional well-being were poorer among children in grandfamilies compared with those living with their mothers, but parenting practices were very similar. These findings suggest that although children in grandfamilies may be at a disadvantage academically and socioemotionally, grandparent caregivers are in many ways similar to other fragile-family mothers. Overall, this study enhances our knowledge of an important yet understudied family type. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Johnson, Cleo Jacobs; Boller, Kimberly; Young, Madeline; Thomas, Jaime; Gonzalez, Daisy
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2015

    This brief presents findings on informal caregivers’ and parents’ networks, focusing on child care arrangements and sources of support and information related to caregiv­ing from a small sample of informal caregiv­ers and parents in California’s Bay Area. It uses ecomapping, a method to create a graphic representation of an individual or family and the web of connections to people and institutions that make up their social support system, to illustrate the caregiver networks. This is the second in a series of three issue briefs  for the Informal Caregivers Research Project, conducted by Mathematica and funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s Children, Families, and Communities (CFC) program. (author abstract)

    This brief presents findings on informal caregivers’ and parents’ networks, focusing on child care arrangements and sources of support and information related to caregiv­ing from a small sample of informal caregiv­ers and parents in California’s Bay Area. It uses ecomapping, a method to create a graphic representation of an individual or family and the web of connections to people and institutions that make up their social support system, to illustrate the caregiver networks. This is the second in a series of three issue briefs  for the Informal Caregivers Research Project, conducted by Mathematica and funded by the David and Lucile Packard Foundation’s Children, Families, and Communities (CFC) program. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Beltran, Ana
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    In 1996, Congress explicitly envisioned Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as a critical support for kinship families or grandfamilies -- families in which children are being raised by kin who are extended family members and close family friends. Almost two decades later, kin continue to rely on TANF as often the only source of financial support for helping them keep the families they raise together and out of the formal foster care system. Although TANF policy explicitly states that children cared for by relatives can receive TANF assistance, many kin families do not access it to meet the needs of children they are unexpectedly raising. Only about 12 percent of kinship families receive any TANF assistance, even though the majority of children being raised by kin live in poverty and qualify for the program.

    This brief highlights states and counties that improve access for kinship families by making these types of exceptions and by creating other policies, practices, and programs that address the challenges the existing TANF framework poses. The May 2012 Annie E...

    In 1996, Congress explicitly envisioned Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (TANF) as a critical support for kinship families or grandfamilies -- families in which children are being raised by kin who are extended family members and close family friends. Almost two decades later, kin continue to rely on TANF as often the only source of financial support for helping them keep the families they raise together and out of the formal foster care system. Although TANF policy explicitly states that children cared for by relatives can receive TANF assistance, many kin families do not access it to meet the needs of children they are unexpectedly raising. Only about 12 percent of kinship families receive any TANF assistance, even though the majority of children being raised by kin live in poverty and qualify for the program.

    This brief highlights states and counties that improve access for kinship families by making these types of exceptions and by creating other policies, practices, and programs that address the challenges the existing TANF framework poses. The May 2012 Annie E. Casey Foundation Kids Count essay, "Stepping Up For Kids", urges states and communities to ensure that kinship families have access to benefits to which they are eligible. In this brief, we provide state and community policymakers and advocates with a Kinship TANF Model that outlines ways in which they can help ensure that kinship families have access to TANF. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ho, Christine
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2014

    The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA; Pub. L. 104-193) in the United States aimed at encouraging work among low-income mothers with children below age 18. In this study, the author used a sample of 2,843 intergenerational family observations from the Health and Retirement Study to estimate the effects of the reform on single grandmothers who are related to those mothers. The results suggest that the reform decreased time transfers but increased money transfers from grandmothers. The results are consistent with an intergenerational family support network where higher child care subsidies motivated the family to shift away from grandmother provided child care and where grandmothers increased money transfers to either help cover the remaining cost of formal care or to partly compensate for the loss in benefits of welfare leavers. (author abstract)

    The 1996 Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act (PRWORA; Pub. L. 104-193) in the United States aimed at encouraging work among low-income mothers with children below age 18. In this study, the author used a sample of 2,843 intergenerational family observations from the Health and Retirement Study to estimate the effects of the reform on single grandmothers who are related to those mothers. The results suggest that the reform decreased time transfers but increased money transfers from grandmothers. The results are consistent with an intergenerational family support network where higher child care subsidies motivated the family to shift away from grandmother provided child care and where grandmothers increased money transfers to either help cover the remaining cost of formal care or to partly compensate for the loss in benefits of welfare leavers. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Steven G. ; Liu, Meirong; Liao, Minli
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Grandparents have become an important source of subsidized noncustodial child care provision as states have developed child care subsidy programs for working families. Based on a sample of 140 grandparents providing care in one state subsidy program, this article examines grandparent characteristics, caregiving patterns, experiences with care provision, and training and resource needs in this emerging public service context. Our findings indicate that grandparents provide care largely for altruistic reasons. They offer vital care during nontraditional work hours and are more receptive to training provision than often is understood. Based on study findings, several strategies are presented for supporting subsidized grandparent caregivers. (author abstract)

    Grandparents have become an important source of subsidized noncustodial child care provision as states have developed child care subsidy programs for working families. Based on a sample of 140 grandparents providing care in one state subsidy program, this article examines grandparent characteristics, caregiving patterns, experiences with care provision, and training and resource needs in this emerging public service context. Our findings indicate that grandparents provide care largely for altruistic reasons. They offer vital care during nontraditional work hours and are more receptive to training provision than often is understood. Based on study findings, several strategies are presented for supporting subsidized grandparent caregivers. (author abstract)

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