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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Hock, Heinrich; Luca, Dara Lee; Kautz, Tim; Stapleton, David
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    We use data from a randomized evaluation of the Job Corps program to understand its impacts for youth with limitations from medical conditions. Job Corps was originally designed for economically disadvantaged youth facing education or employment barriers due to their community living environment. The program provides all enrollees with an integrated package of work-focused supports including general education, vocational training, soft skills development, and ultimately job placement. Our findings provide new information about the program’s impacts for approximately 470 youth with medical limitations (YMLs) included in the 1990s National Job Corps Study. Although YMLs were at greater risk for adverse outcomes relative to other enrollees, the impacts of Job Corps for this group have not been previously assessed. We find positive, large, and significant impacts per participant on self-reported employment and earnings; further, the program significantly reduced their dependence on long-term disability benefits. These estimated per-participant impacts were at least twice the size of...

    We use data from a randomized evaluation of the Job Corps program to understand its impacts for youth with limitations from medical conditions. Job Corps was originally designed for economically disadvantaged youth facing education or employment barriers due to their community living environment. The program provides all enrollees with an integrated package of work-focused supports including general education, vocational training, soft skills development, and ultimately job placement. Our findings provide new information about the program’s impacts for approximately 470 youth with medical limitations (YMLs) included in the 1990s National Job Corps Study. Although YMLs were at greater risk for adverse outcomes relative to other enrollees, the impacts of Job Corps for this group have not been previously assessed. We find positive, large, and significant impacts per participant on self-reported employment and earnings; further, the program significantly reduced their dependence on long-term disability benefits. These estimated per-participant impacts were at least twice the size of the corresponding impacts for other youths who did not have medical limitations at enrollment. Although more research on current program operations is needed, our findings suggest that Job Corps could help meet state and national policy goals for improving adult work outcomes for youth with disabilities and reducing their reliance on disability benefits. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hoffman, Denise; Hemmeter, Jeffrey; Bailey, Michelle S.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients are presumed eligible for vocational rehabilitation services and youth who receive SSI may access those services as they prepare for the transition from school to work. Vocational rehabilitation (VR) is intended to help youth with disabilities become employed and maintain employment and thereby lessen their reliance on disability benefits in adulthood. In passing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in 2014, policymakers sought to expand VR and complementary services for transition-age youth with disabilities, in part to improve their employment outcomes in adulthood and decrease their reliance on benefits. In this brief, we document the rates of participation in VR by youth SSI recipients, describe the characteristics of youth who receive VR, and report on the association between youth’s VR participation and their employment and benefit outcomes in adulthood. Our findings indicate that, in 2001, 13 percent of youth SSI recipients ages 14 to 17 reported receiving VR services. Thirteen years later, when these individuals were...

    Supplemental Security Income (SSI) recipients are presumed eligible for vocational rehabilitation services and youth who receive SSI may access those services as they prepare for the transition from school to work. Vocational rehabilitation (VR) is intended to help youth with disabilities become employed and maintain employment and thereby lessen their reliance on disability benefits in adulthood. In passing the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act in 2014, policymakers sought to expand VR and complementary services for transition-age youth with disabilities, in part to improve their employment outcomes in adulthood and decrease their reliance on benefits. In this brief, we document the rates of participation in VR by youth SSI recipients, describe the characteristics of youth who receive VR, and report on the association between youth’s VR participation and their employment and benefit outcomes in adulthood. Our findings indicate that, in 2001, 13 percent of youth SSI recipients ages 14 to 17 reported receiving VR services. Thirteen years later, when these individuals were ages 27 to 30, a higher proportion had substantial earnings and a lower proportion received SSI compared with other SSI recipients who did not receive VR services, holding observable characteristics constant. We cannot determine the extent to which the associations between VR and these adult outcomes reflect unobserved differences between youth who participate in VR and those who do not versus the effect of VR services on outcomes. Nonetheless, the promising associations between VR and long-term adult outcomes highlight the potential benefits of providing early support to transition-age youth. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Schwabish, Jonathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services. (Author abstract)

    This brief examines correlates of DI benefit receipt for people with mental disorders, focusing on the higher rate of receipt in the six New England states. In 2015, 1.8 percent of all 18- to 65-year-olds across the country received DI benefits because of mental disorders. That recipiency rate was markedly higher in Maine, New Hampshire, Rhode Island, and Vermont. The evidence suggests that access to and treatment from the health care system (which tend to be better in New England states) may help people identify their illnesses and contact the DI program and other services. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Poe-Yamagata, Eileen
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This presentation was given during the 2017 NAWRS conference. Topics include determining if American Job Centers (AJCs) are accessible to people with disabilities, how accessibility varies across three domains (physical, communication, and programmatic), and how accessibility varies by characteristics of the AJCs. 

    This presentation was given during the 2017 NAWRS conference. Topics include determining if American Job Centers (AJCs) are accessible to people with disabilities, how accessibility varies across three domains (physical, communication, and programmatic), and how accessibility varies by characteristics of the AJCs. 

  • Individual Author: Anand, Priyanka; Sevak, Purvi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    We explore the role of workplace accommodations in reducing employment barriers and improving the employment of people with disabilities. We do so using data from the 2015 Survey of Disability and Employment on people with disabilities who applied for vocational rehabilitation services in three states. The results show that at least one third of nonworking people with disabilities reported employment barriers that could be addressed by workplace accommodations, such as lack of transportation and an inaccessible workplace. We also find that receiving certain types of workplace accommodations, such as help with transportation, flexible work schedules, or a personal care attendant, is positively correlated with being employed at the time of the survey. Finally, people who are in poor health or have physical disabilities were more likely to perceive workplace inaccessibility as a barrier but less likely to have received accommodations in their current or most recent job. This suggests that people with these characteristics may be good candidates to target for greater access to...

    We explore the role of workplace accommodations in reducing employment barriers and improving the employment of people with disabilities. We do so using data from the 2015 Survey of Disability and Employment on people with disabilities who applied for vocational rehabilitation services in three states. The results show that at least one third of nonworking people with disabilities reported employment barriers that could be addressed by workplace accommodations, such as lack of transportation and an inaccessible workplace. We also find that receiving certain types of workplace accommodations, such as help with transportation, flexible work schedules, or a personal care attendant, is positively correlated with being employed at the time of the survey. Finally, people who are in poor health or have physical disabilities were more likely to perceive workplace inaccessibility as a barrier but less likely to have received accommodations in their current or most recent job. This suggests that people with these characteristics may be good candidates to target for greater access to workplace accommodations. (Author abstract) 

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