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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Briefel, Ronette; Melia, Micah; Harvey, Bonnie; Forrestal, Sarah; Chojnacki, Gregory ; Caronongan, Pia; Gothro, Andrew; Cabili, Charlotte; Kleinman, Rebecca; Gabor, Vivian; Redel, Nicholas; Gleason, Philip
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months. (Author abstract) 

    This study—authorized by the 2010 Child Nutrition Act—tests innovative strategies to end childhood hunger and food insecurity. The interim evaluation report describes (1) the demonstration projects, (2) planning and early implementation activities, and (3) findings from the baseline data collection for four projects located within Chickasaw Nation, Kentucky, Nevada, and Virginia. A fifth demonstration project was implemented in Navajo Nation but not evaluated due to changes in program design. The demonstrations occurred during 2015-2017 and operated for 12 to 24 months. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: King Bowes, Kendra; Burrus, Barri B.; Axelson, Sarah; Garrido, Milagros; Kimbriel, Adriana ; Abramson, Lisa; Gorman, Gwenda; Dancer, Angela; White, Terrill; Beaudry, PJ
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    Systemic inequities, including a lack of culturally appropriate sexual health education, put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents at higher-than-average risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes. For example, in 2013, the birth rate among AI/AN adolescents aged 15 to 19 years was 31.1 per 1000 individuals, compared with 18.6 for White adolescents. AI/AN youths report earlier onset of sexual activity and greater numbers of sexual partners than do youths in general. In 2011, among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. From 2011 through 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Family and Youth Services Bureau, through the Tribal Personal Responsibility Education Program (Tribal PREP), funded 14 tribes and tribal organizations to select, adapt, and implement culturally relevant, evidence-informed contraceptive and abstinence education curricula for their communities. Grantees also promoted successful transitions to adulthood...

    Systemic inequities, including a lack of culturally appropriate sexual health education, put American Indian and Alaska Native (AI/AN) adolescents at higher-than-average risk for adverse sexual and reproductive health outcomes. For example, in 2013, the birth rate among AI/AN adolescents aged 15 to 19 years was 31.1 per 1000 individuals, compared with 18.6 for White adolescents. AI/AN youths report earlier onset of sexual activity and greater numbers of sexual partners than do youths in general. In 2011, among all races and ethnicities, AI/ANs had the second highest rates of chlamydia and gonorrhea and the third highest rates of primary and secondary syphilis. From 2011 through 2014, the US Department of Health and Human Services’ Family and Youth Services Bureau, through the Tribal Personal Responsibility Education Program (Tribal PREP), funded 14 tribes and tribal organizations to select, adapt, and implement culturally relevant, evidence-informed contraceptive and abstinence education curricula for their communities. Grantees also promoted successful transitions to adulthood by providing content on selected adulthood preparation subjects. Addressing these longstanding health inequities requires intervention and evaluation approaches that are culturally consonant with the tribal communities in which they will be used. An abundance of research emphasizes the importance of incorporating community-based participatory research approaches for culturally tailoring these interventions and evaluation methods. Drawing on this rich history, we extend the concept here by directly including the voices from front-line staff responsible for Tribal PREP program implementation as authors. Because there is little empirical research on evidence-based curricula and practices for AI/AN youths, the lessons learned by these program implementers offer firsthand experiences to further increase cultural awareness and improve future adolescent pregnancy prevention (APP) interventions for AI/AN adolescents, helping fill the gap in empirical research. (Author Introduction)

  • Individual Author: Werner, Alan; Koralek, Robin; Locke, Gretchen; Loprest, Pamela; Eyster, Lauren
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program is designed to deliver high-quality training in the health professions to eligible individuals. A National Evaluation of 27 grants awarded in 2015 as part of the second round of HPOG grants (HPOG 2.0) is currently underway. The National Evaluation will include a Descriptive Evaluation of the implementation, outcomes, and local service delivery systems of the grants as well as an Impact Evaluation of the grants’ impacts on participants and the HPOG Program’s costs and benefits.

    This report presents a research design plan for the Descriptive Evaluation, which includes three related studies:(i) the Implementation Study, (ii) the Outcome Study, and (iii) the Systems Study. Each of these studies makes important independent contributions to the National Evaluation:

    • The Implementation Study will describe HPOG 2.0 Program design and implementation, including Program context, administration, costs, education and support services, and employment assistance services.
    • The Outcome Study will describe HPOG 2.0...

    The Health Profession Opportunity Grants (HPOG) Program is designed to deliver high-quality training in the health professions to eligible individuals. A National Evaluation of 27 grants awarded in 2015 as part of the second round of HPOG grants (HPOG 2.0) is currently underway. The National Evaluation will include a Descriptive Evaluation of the implementation, outcomes, and local service delivery systems of the grants as well as an Impact Evaluation of the grants’ impacts on participants and the HPOG Program’s costs and benefits.

    This report presents a research design plan for the Descriptive Evaluation, which includes three related studies:(i) the Implementation Study, (ii) the Outcome Study, and (iii) the Systems Study. Each of these studies makes important independent contributions to the National Evaluation:

    • The Implementation Study will describe HPOG 2.0 Program design and implementation, including Program context, administration, costs, education and support services, and employment assistance services.
    • The Outcome Study will describe HPOG 2.0 participant characteristics, program experiences, and educational and employment outcomes.
    • The Systems Study will describe how local service delivery systems (i.e., community resources, funding availability, economic conditions, and policies) may have influenced HPOG program design and implementation and how HPOG implementation may have influenced these local systems. (Author abstract) 
  • Individual Author: Parents as Teachers
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    Over the past 20 years, the Parents as Teachers model has been adapted and delivered in more than 100 Tribal communities in the U.S. During this time, more than 10,000 Native American families have been served by Parents as Teachers. More than half of the today’s federal Tribal Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting Tribes have chosen Parents as Teachers as their preferred home visiting model, citing the organization’s history of working with American Indian and Alaskan Native families. (Author introduction)

    Over the past 20 years, the Parents as Teachers model has been adapted and delivered in more than 100 Tribal communities in the U.S. During this time, more than 10,000 Native American families have been served by Parents as Teachers. More than half of the today’s federal Tribal Maternal, Infant, Early Childhood Home Visiting Tribes have chosen Parents as Teachers as their preferred home visiting model, citing the organization’s history of working with American Indian and Alaskan Native families. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Bernstein, Sara; Malone, Lizabeth; Klein, Ashley Kopack; Bush, Charles; Feeney, Kathleen; Reid, Maya; Lukashanets, Serge; Aikens, Nikki
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Introduction

    AI/AN FACES 2015 is the first national study of Region XI AI/AN Head Start children and their families, classrooms, and programs. This set of tables presents data on the demographic backgrounds and developmental outcomes of children enrolled in Region XI AI/AN Head Start programs during the 2015–16 Head Start year. The tables also detail aspects of their home environment and family life. Data on children’s classrooms, teachers, centers, and programs, including aspects of classroom quality and practice, teacher and director characteristics, and characteristics of the center and program environments, provide context for children’s experiences. We also provide information on the AI/AN FACES 2015 study methodology and collaborative design process, sample, and measures.

    The study design, implementation, and dissemination has been informed by extensive collaboration with a workgroup comprised of Region XI Head Start directors, early childhood researchers with experience working with tribal communities, Mathematica researchers, and federal...

    Introduction

    AI/AN FACES 2015 is the first national study of Region XI AI/AN Head Start children and their families, classrooms, and programs. This set of tables presents data on the demographic backgrounds and developmental outcomes of children enrolled in Region XI AI/AN Head Start programs during the 2015–16 Head Start year. The tables also detail aspects of their home environment and family life. Data on children’s classrooms, teachers, centers, and programs, including aspects of classroom quality and practice, teacher and director characteristics, and characteristics of the center and program environments, provide context for children’s experiences. We also provide information on the AI/AN FACES 2015 study methodology and collaborative design process, sample, and measures.

    The study design, implementation, and dissemination has been informed by extensive collaboration with a workgroup comprised of Region XI Head Start directors, early childhood researchers with experience working with tribal communities, Mathematica researchers, and federal government officials from the Office of Head Start and the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation. The AI/AN FACES 2015 child sample was selected to represent all children enrolled in Region XI Head Start in fall 2015, drawing on participants from 21 randomly selected Region XI programs from across the country. AI/AN FACES 2015 includes a battery of child assessments across many developmental domains; surveys of children’s parents, teachers, and program managers; and classroom observations.

    The study is conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and its partner—Educational Testing Service—under contract to the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.

    Purpose

    The purpose of this report is two-fold: (1) to provide information about the AI/AN FACES 2015 study, including the background, design, methodology, measures, and analytic methods, and (2) to report detailed descriptive statistics in a series of tables on children, their families, and their classrooms, centers, and programs. The data provide descriptive information from parent surveys, direct child assessments, teacher child reports, teacher surveys, classroom observations, and center and program director surveys.

    Key Findings and Highlights

    The data tables provide descriptive information on Region XI Head Start children, their families, classrooms, centers, and programs.

    For children’s characteristics, family demographics, and home environment, the tables show:

    • Demographic characteristics (e.g., age, race/ethnicity, home language environment, household composition)
    • Parent education, employment status, household income as a percentage of the federal poverty threshold, household financial strain, and food security
    • Parent’s tribal language use and parent cultural connections and identity
    • Community activities with the child in the past month
    • Home learning activities, joint book reading, and storytelling frequency
    • Child’s health care home use
    • Parent health behaviors and depressive symptoms
    • Parent neighborhood characteristics and neighborhood problems

    For children’s cognitive, social-emotional, and health and physical development, the tables show:

    • Reliability of assessments of child cognitive and social emotional measures
    • Language, literacy, and math skills of children
    • Children’s executive function, social skills, problem behaviors, and approaches to learning
    • Parent-reported child health status, and children’s height, weight, and body mass index

    For children’s classroom, center, and program cultural and language environment, the tables show:

    • Children’s classroom AI/AN composition and race/ethnicity of children’s classroom staff
    • Staff’s connection to community in children’s classrooms
    • Children’s classroom exposure to cultural items and practices
    • Culture and tribal language exposure, and cultural curricula and assessment tools in children’s classrooms and centers

    For children’s classroom, teacher, center, and program characteristics, the tables show:

    • The quality of Region XI Head Start children’s classrooms
    • Curricula and assessment tools used and frequency of reading, language, and math activities in children’s classrooms
    • Mentoring and training received by children’s teachers
    • Children’s lead teachers’ background characteristics, depressive symptoms, attitudes, and job satisfaction
    • Structural characteristics of children’s Region XI Head Start programs (such as enrollment, agency type, source of revenue) and centers (staffing and turnover)
    • Children’s center and program director background characteristics
    • Training and technical assistance efforts in children’s programs (including professional development offered to staff)

    The tables provide this information for all Region XI Head Start children. For some tables, information is also provided for only Region XI Head Start children who are American Indian or Alaska Native.

    Methods

    The AI/AN FACES 2015 sample provides information about Region XI Head Start children, their families, classrooms, centers, and programs. We selected a sample of Region XI Head Start programs from the 2012-2013 Head Start Program Information Report, selecting one to two centers per program and two to four classrooms per center. Within each classroom, all children were selected for the study. Twenty-one programs, 36 centers, 73 classrooms, and 1,049 children participated in the study.

    The statistics in these tables are estimates of key characteristics of the population of Region XI Head Start children and their families in fall 2015 and spring 2016 and of children’s classrooms, centers, and programs in spring 2016. The data used to report on fall 2015 characteristics are weighted to represent all children enrolled in Region XI programs in fall 2015. The data used to report on spring 2016 characteristics and on fall-spring change are weighted to represent all children enrolled in Region XI programs in fall 2015 and who were still enrolled in spring 2016. (Author introduction)

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