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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: MDRC; Department of Health and Human Services, Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project conducted randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions at two child care agencies in Indiana and Oklahoma. This brief provides an overview of the interventions the BIAS team designed in partnership with these sites, which targeted two primary problems:

    1. Many parents who receive Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) vouchers do not select a highly rated provider, even in states that have a standardized system for rating provider quality.
    2. Some parents who are required to periodically document their continued eligibility for CCDF subsidies do not complete this process on time, which can lead to gaps in service, loss of funds for providers, and increased administrative burden for agencies.

    One-page site summaries in this brief detail the problem or problems of interest at each agency, the behavioral intervention(s) implemented to address each of those problems, and the findings from the tests of the interventions. (Author abstract) 

    The Behavioral Interventions to Advance Self-Sufficiency project conducted randomized controlled trials of behavioral interventions at two child care agencies in Indiana and Oklahoma. This brief provides an overview of the interventions the BIAS team designed in partnership with these sites, which targeted two primary problems:

    1. Many parents who receive Child Care and Development Fund (CCDF) vouchers do not select a highly rated provider, even in states that have a standardized system for rating provider quality.
    2. Some parents who are required to periodically document their continued eligibility for CCDF subsidies do not complete this process on time, which can lead to gaps in service, loss of funds for providers, and increased administrative burden for agencies.

    One-page site summaries in this brief detail the problem or problems of interest at each agency, the behavioral intervention(s) implemented to address each of those problems, and the findings from the tests of the interventions. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: McCay, Jonathan; Derr, Michelle; Person, Ann
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    A road test is an iterative, rapid prototyping approach used to refine the design and implementation of a program strategy or intervention. This analytic piloting process involves multiple cycles of gathering formative feedback, adjusting the design, and strengthening the implementation of a strategy prior to scaling it up. By using this accessible approach to vetting programmatic changes, human services practitioners can clarify and strengthen the linkages between a program strategy and its anticipated outcomes and more precisely identify the necessary conditions for successful implementation. The road test is part of the Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2) process for using and producing evidence in the course of program change. Pilot testing is a common practice in human services programs (such as workforce development and employment services, safety net programs, child welfare services, early childhood education programs, and healthy family programs, among others), yet programs can often do more to maximize learning from the experience of trying something new. In cases where a...

    A road test is an iterative, rapid prototyping approach used to refine the design and implementation of a program strategy or intervention. This analytic piloting process involves multiple cycles of gathering formative feedback, adjusting the design, and strengthening the implementation of a strategy prior to scaling it up. By using this accessible approach to vetting programmatic changes, human services practitioners can clarify and strengthen the linkages between a program strategy and its anticipated outcomes and more precisely identify the necessary conditions for successful implementation. The road test is part of the Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2) process for using and producing evidence in the course of program change. Pilot testing is a common practice in human services programs (such as workforce development and employment services, safety net programs, child welfare services, early childhood education programs, and healthy family programs, among others), yet programs can often do more to maximize learning from the experience of trying something new. In cases where a strategy or intervention is rolled out without intentional and incremental refinement, the program change might ultimately be abandoned due to complications or perceived ineffectiveness, resulting in wasted energy and resources. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Derr, Michelle; Person, Ann; McCay, Jonathan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2) process is a systematic, evidence-informed approach to program improvement. LI2 involves a series of analytic and replicable activities, supported by collaboration between practitioners and applied researchers, to help human services programs design, implement, and iteratively test programmatic changes. As a continuous improvement process, LI2 is intended to build practitioners’ capacity for better using and producing high-quality evidence; ultimately, this process can be institutionalized within the program environment. Human services programs (such as workforce development and employment services, safety net programs, child welfare services, early childhood education programs, and healthy family programs, among others) often seek to improve their practices in order to better help their clients. For various reasons, however, undertaking a systematic and evidence-informed approach to program change may not always happen. The LI2 process was collaboratively designed as a flexible solution to help programs embed analytic methods into their change...

    The Learn, Innovate, Improve (LI2) process is a systematic, evidence-informed approach to program improvement. LI2 involves a series of analytic and replicable activities, supported by collaboration between practitioners and applied researchers, to help human services programs design, implement, and iteratively test programmatic changes. As a continuous improvement process, LI2 is intended to build practitioners’ capacity for better using and producing high-quality evidence; ultimately, this process can be institutionalized within the program environment. Human services programs (such as workforce development and employment services, safety net programs, child welfare services, early childhood education programs, and healthy family programs, among others) often seek to improve their practices in order to better help their clients. For various reasons, however, undertaking a systematic and evidence-informed approach to program change may not always happen. The LI2 process was collaboratively designed as a flexible solution to help programs embed analytic methods into their change and quality improvement efforts. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Wood, Robert G.; Kisker, Ellen
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Steps to Success program, a home visiting program for adolescent mothers that offers counseling on contraception, adequate birth spacing, parenting, and child development. Healthy Families San Angelo (HFSA)—an experienced, community-based organization in San Angelo, Texas—implemented the program with funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study in which adolescent mothers who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to Steps to Success or to a control group that received a more traditional home visiting program that focused only on parenting and child development. (Author abstract) 

    This brief summarizes key findings from a study of the implementation of the Steps to Success program, a home visiting program for adolescent mothers that offers counseling on contraception, adequate birth spacing, parenting, and child development. Healthy Families San Angelo (HFSA)—an experienced, community-based organization in San Angelo, Texas—implemented the program with funding from a Personal Responsibility Education Program (PREP) grant. The implementation study was conducted in conjunction with a rigorous impact study in which adolescent mothers who agreed to take part in the study were randomly assigned to Steps to Success or to a control group that received a more traditional home visiting program that focused only on parenting and child development. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Ross, Christine; Sama-Miller, Emily; Roberts, Lily
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2018

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research can provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author abstract) 

    The Exploration of Integrated Approaches to Supporting Child Development and Improving Family Economic Security project investigated the design and evaluability of approaches to alleviating poverty that address the needs of low-income parents and children. The project examined programs that deliberately combine services that are intended to support both child development and parental economic security. Recent advances in implementation science and other fields of research can provide key insights for new programs that may prove more effective than similar programs designed in the 1980s and 1990s. The project was funded by the Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families (ACF), U.S. Department of Health and Human Services, and was conducted by Mathematica Policy Research and Northwestern University. (Author abstract) 

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