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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: McDonnell, K.A; Nagaraj, N.C.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the first phase of the Accomplishments of the Domestic Violence Hotline, Online Connections and Text (ADVHOCaT) project.

    The objective of the first phase is to describe the activities and immediate outcomes of the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) and loveisrespect help line (LIR) and to revise or develop new performance measures.

    This fact sheet presents initial findings related to the following questions:

    1. What services and resources do The Hotline/LIR provide to contactors (i.e., those who contact The Hotline and LIR, including victims/survivors, friends and family, service providers, and batterers/abusers?)

    2. Do contactors receive the information and assistance they need and/or seek?

    3. Do contactors view the information and assistance as helpful?

    4. What are the trends and patterns in the various modes of service and which modes of service do contactors prefer?

    It also describes next steps for data collection and analyses. (Author abstract)

     

    This fact sheet provides an overview of the first phase of the Accomplishments of the Domestic Violence Hotline, Online Connections and Text (ADVHOCaT) project.

    The objective of the first phase is to describe the activities and immediate outcomes of the National Domestic Violence Hotline (The Hotline) and loveisrespect help line (LIR) and to revise or develop new performance measures.

    This fact sheet presents initial findings related to the following questions:

    1. What services and resources do The Hotline/LIR provide to contactors (i.e., those who contact The Hotline and LIR, including victims/survivors, friends and family, service providers, and batterers/abusers?)

    2. Do contactors receive the information and assistance they need and/or seek?

    3. Do contactors view the information and assistance as helpful?

    4. What are the trends and patterns in the various modes of service and which modes of service do contactors prefer?

    It also describes next steps for data collection and analyses. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Cavadel, Elizabeth W.; Kauff, Jacqueline F. ; Anderson, Mary Anne ; McConnell, Sheena M.; Derr, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that...

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that have been successful in other contexts. In addition, the report provides examples of employment programs that have incorporated interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment and discusses the importance and challenges of measuring the success of such interventions. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Maxwell, Kelly
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Policymakers are increasingly interested in using administrative data to address pressing, policy-relevant questions. The federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), for instance, issued a memo in 2014 that encouraged agencies to use and share administrative data and provided guidance related to using administrative data for statistical purposes (M-14-06). Building on this, the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services focused its 2015 Innovative Methods meeting on the promises and challenges of using administrative data in social policy research.

    This brief is based on a panel presentation at that meeting, Gaining Access and Maintaining Confidentiality. The purpose of this brief is to provide an overview of the multiple aspects of access to consider when using administrative data for social policy research. It includes discussion of access to data, importance of relationships, considering and valuing both confidentiality and access to data, and building...

    Policymakers are increasingly interested in using administrative data to address pressing, policy-relevant questions. The federal Office of Management and Budget (OMB), for instance, issued a memo in 2014 that encouraged agencies to use and share administrative data and provided guidance related to using administrative data for statistical purposes (M-14-06). Building on this, the Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) in the Administration for Children and Families, U.S. Department of Health and Human Services focused its 2015 Innovative Methods meeting on the promises and challenges of using administrative data in social policy research.

    This brief is based on a panel presentation at that meeting, Gaining Access and Maintaining Confidentiality. The purpose of this brief is to provide an overview of the multiple aspects of access to consider when using administrative data for social policy research. It includes discussion of access to data, importance of relationships, considering and valuing both confidentiality and access to data, and building capacity for the use of administrative data. As an overview, it is intended to raise awareness of issues rather than extensively describe access issues or offer strategies for overcoming challenges in accessing data. Multiple other resources are available regarding the use of administrative data. One example is the Child Care and Early Education Research Connections Working with Administrative Data webpage, where administrative data resources are summarized and updated quarterly. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Brown, Scott R.; Shinn, Marybeth; Khadduri, Jill
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This brief examines the well-being of young children 20 months after staying in emergency homeless shelters with their families.

    Using data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study, the brief explores young children’s:

    •pre-reading skills

    •pre-math skills

    •developmental delays

    •behavior challenges

    It draws comparisons between children who experienced homelessness and national norms for children of the same age.

    The brief also examines housing instability, child care instability, and enrollment in center-based care and Head Start, and associations between housing and child care stability and child well-being. (Author abstract)

    This brief examines the well-being of young children 20 months after staying in emergency homeless shelters with their families.

    Using data from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development’s Family Options Study, the brief explores young children’s:

    •pre-reading skills

    •pre-math skills

    •developmental delays

    •behavior challenges

    It draws comparisons between children who experienced homelessness and national norms for children of the same age.

    The brief also examines housing instability, child care instability, and enrollment in center-based care and Head Start, and associations between housing and child care stability and child well-being. (Author abstract)

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