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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Orrell, Brent; DiSalvo, Clare; Compton, Wilson; Feese, Tonya; Germain, Justin
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2018

    Opioid use disorder disproportionately affects low-income populations and research suggests that it is a significant barrier to employment. This session provided an introduction to opioid use disorder and effective treatment strategies, present current research on the prevalence of the disorder among TANF recipients, and showcase one state’s efforts to identify TANF recipients and others struggling with the disorder and connect them to treatment. Clare DiSalvo (Administration for Children and Families/Business Strategy Consultants) served as the moderator and Brent Orrell (ICF International) served as the discussant.

     

    Opioid use disorder disproportionately affects low-income populations and research suggests that it is a significant barrier to employment. This session provided an introduction to opioid use disorder and effective treatment strategies, present current research on the prevalence of the disorder among TANF recipients, and showcase one state’s efforts to identify TANF recipients and others struggling with the disorder and connect them to treatment. Clare DiSalvo (Administration for Children and Families/Business Strategy Consultants) served as the moderator and Brent Orrell (ICF International) served as the discussant.

     

  • Individual Author: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    Trauma is a widespread, harmful and costly public health problem. It occurs as a result of violence, abuse, neglect, loss, disaster, war and other emotionally harmful experiences. Trauma has no boundaries with regard to age, gender, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, geography, or sexual orientation. It is an almost universal experience of people with mental and substance use disorders. The need to address trauma is increasingly viewed as an important component of effective behavioral health service delivery. Additionally, it has become evident that addressing trauma requires a multi-pronged, multi-agency public health approach inclusive of public education and awareness, prevention and early identification, and effective trauma-specific assessment and treatment. In order to maximize the impact of these efforts, they need to be provided in an organizational or community context that is trauma-informed, that is, based on the knowledge and understanding of trauma and its far-reaching implications. (Author abstract)

    Trauma is a widespread, harmful and costly public health problem. It occurs as a result of violence, abuse, neglect, loss, disaster, war and other emotionally harmful experiences. Trauma has no boundaries with regard to age, gender, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, geography, or sexual orientation. It is an almost universal experience of people with mental and substance use disorders. The need to address trauma is increasingly viewed as an important component of effective behavioral health service delivery. Additionally, it has become evident that addressing trauma requires a multi-pronged, multi-agency public health approach inclusive of public education and awareness, prevention and early identification, and effective trauma-specific assessment and treatment. In order to maximize the impact of these efforts, they need to be provided in an organizational or community context that is trauma-informed, that is, based on the knowledge and understanding of trauma and its far-reaching implications. (Author abstract)