Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sawhill, Isabel
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2015

    Fifty years ago, in 1965, Daniel Patrick Moynihan presciently warned that the breakdown of the family was becoming a key source of disadvantage in the African American community. He received intense criticism at the time. Yet the trends he identified have not gone away. Indeed, they have “trickled up” to encompass not just a much larger fraction of the African American community but a large swath of the white community as well. Still, the racial gaps remain large. The proportion of black children born outside marriage was 72 percent in 2012, while the white proportion was 36 percent (see “Was Moynihan Right?” features, Spring 2015, Figure 2). The effects on children of the increase in single parents is no longer much debated. They do less well in school, are less likely to graduate, and are more likely to be involved in crime, teen pregnancy, and other behaviors that make it harder to succeed in life. Not every child raised by a single parent will suffer from the experience, but, on average, a lone parent has fewer resources—both time and money—with which to raise a child....

    Fifty years ago, in 1965, Daniel Patrick Moynihan presciently warned that the breakdown of the family was becoming a key source of disadvantage in the African American community. He received intense criticism at the time. Yet the trends he identified have not gone away. Indeed, they have “trickled up” to encompass not just a much larger fraction of the African American community but a large swath of the white community as well. Still, the racial gaps remain large. The proportion of black children born outside marriage was 72 percent in 2012, while the white proportion was 36 percent (see “Was Moynihan Right?” features, Spring 2015, Figure 2). The effects on children of the increase in single parents is no longer much debated. They do less well in school, are less likely to graduate, and are more likely to be involved in crime, teen pregnancy, and other behaviors that make it harder to succeed in life. Not every child raised by a single parent will suffer from the experience, but, on average, a lone parent has fewer resources—both time and money—with which to raise a child. Poverty rates for single-parent families are five times those for married-parent families (see “Was Moynihan Right?” features, Spring 2015, Figure 4)...Recent research suggests that boys are indeed more affected than girls by the lack of a male role model in the family. If true, this sets the stage for a cycle of poverty in which mother-headed families produce boys who go on to father their own children outside marriage. But what does all of this have to do with education? Rates of unwed childbearing and divorce are much lower among well-educated than among less-educated women. The proportion of first births that occur outside of marriage is only 12 percent for those who are college graduates but 58 percent for everyone else. So more and better education is one clear path to reducing unwed parenthood and the growth of single parent families in the future. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Administration for Children and Families, Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2014

    This report provides detailed summaries of major research investments by OPRE’s Division of Family Strengthening (DFS) along with brief overviews of past projects. The featured projects cover topics that include strengthening relationships within families, supporting fatherhood, nurturing children through their families, reducing teen pregnancy, and supporting youth in their transition to adulthood. The report also describes DFS’s investments in activities to disseminate rigorous research on family strengthening topics to a diverse range of stakeholders including federal and state policy-makers, program administrators, researchers, and intermediary organizations. This report covers OPRE-funded projects through Fiscal Year 2013. (author abstract)

    This report provides detailed summaries of major research investments by OPRE’s Division of Family Strengthening (DFS) along with brief overviews of past projects. The featured projects cover topics that include strengthening relationships within families, supporting fatherhood, nurturing children through their families, reducing teen pregnancy, and supporting youth in their transition to adulthood. The report also describes DFS’s investments in activities to disseminate rigorous research on family strengthening topics to a diverse range of stakeholders including federal and state policy-makers, program administrators, researchers, and intermediary organizations. This report covers OPRE-funded projects through Fiscal Year 2013. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Bassi, Laurie J.; Lerman, Robert I.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    Over the last two decades, Congress has passed several laws intended to increase the number and the amount of child support awards, as well as the capacity to collect these awards. Amendments to the Social Security Act in 1975, 1984, 1988, and 1993 mandated the development and use of award standards and expanded the tools for establishing paternity, establishing new child support awards, and collecting child support due to the custodial parent. If operated as intended, these new requirements will raise the level of support awards and the proportion of awards actually collected. However, the actual effects will depend on the responses to increased disincentives to report income and to make support payments. One disincentive arises from state guidelines that implicitly or explicitly create a direct link between child support obligations and income. Obligations thus become an "income tax" on the noncustodial parent's income—a tax that reduces the effective (i.e., after-tax) wage rate of that parent. When the child support "tax" is added to the other taxes (federal, state, and FICA...

    Over the last two decades, Congress has passed several laws intended to increase the number and the amount of child support awards, as well as the capacity to collect these awards. Amendments to the Social Security Act in 1975, 1984, 1988, and 1993 mandated the development and use of award standards and expanded the tools for establishing paternity, establishing new child support awards, and collecting child support due to the custodial parent. If operated as intended, these new requirements will raise the level of support awards and the proportion of awards actually collected. However, the actual effects will depend on the responses to increased disincentives to report income and to make support payments. One disincentive arises from state guidelines that implicitly or explicitly create a direct link between child support obligations and income. Obligations thus become an "income tax" on the noncustodial parent's income—a tax that reduces the effective (i.e., after-tax) wage rate of that parent. When the child support "tax" is added to the other taxes (federal, state, and FICA), many noncustodial parents face high marginal tax rates. Low income noncustodial parents face the highest rates— potentially in excess of 70 percent.'

    The second disincentive is that child support payments paid to custodial parents receiving a welfare payment go mainly to offset government welfare spending instead of raising the incomes of the children. Custodial parents receiving AFDC can keep only the first $50 in monthly child support payments, but the remaining support payments go to offset AFDC benefits. Because nearly all AFDC families also receive food stamps, the net gain can actually fall to $35 per month of the noncustodial parent's support payment. If the custodial parent receives only food stamps, the net income gain from the receipt of child support will be 70 percent of the actual payments. (author abstract)