Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Eckstein, Daniel S.; Young, Dana M.
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2017

    The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was enacted on July 22, 2014. WIOA calls for cross-system alignment; education and training that is focused on the needs of high-demand industry sectors and occupations; regional collaboration focused on the skill needs of regional economies; and the establishment of career pathways systems that make it easier for all Americans to attain the skills and credentials needed for family-supporting jobs and careers. Within these systems, career pathways programs offer a clear sequence, or pathway, of education coursework and/or training credentials aligned with employer-validated work readiness standards and competencies. This checklist is designed as a work aid to help determine the extent to which a newly developed or existing program meets the requirements for career pathways in section (3)(7) of WIOA. (Author abstract) 

    The Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA) was enacted on July 22, 2014. WIOA calls for cross-system alignment; education and training that is focused on the needs of high-demand industry sectors and occupations; regional collaboration focused on the skill needs of regional economies; and the establishment of career pathways systems that make it easier for all Americans to attain the skills and credentials needed for family-supporting jobs and careers. Within these systems, career pathways programs offer a clear sequence, or pathway, of education coursework and/or training credentials aligned with employer-validated work readiness standards and competencies. This checklist is designed as a work aid to help determine the extent to which a newly developed or existing program meets the requirements for career pathways in section (3)(7) of WIOA. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Goesling, Brian
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2015

    To date, most teen pregnancy prevention programs have been evaluated only once, often in small-scale efficacy trials involving the program developer. In recent years, however, a growing number of studies have sought to test how these programs perform when implemented on a broader scale, in different settings, or with different populations. These replication studies have the potential to greatly advance the field of teen pregnancy prevention research and help sustain the recent drop in teen birth rates in the United States. Achieving these goals, however, will require a careful interpretation and synthesis of study findings that avoids overly simplistic notions of replication “failure” and “success.” (author abstract)

    To date, most teen pregnancy prevention programs have been evaluated only once, often in small-scale efficacy trials involving the program developer. In recent years, however, a growing number of studies have sought to test how these programs perform when implemented on a broader scale, in different settings, or with different populations. These replication studies have the potential to greatly advance the field of teen pregnancy prevention research and help sustain the recent drop in teen birth rates in the United States. Achieving these goals, however, will require a careful interpretation and synthesis of study findings that avoids overly simplistic notions of replication “failure” and “success.” (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Goesling, Brian; Lee, Joanne
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2015

    Quasi-experimental evaluations of social and public health interventions often face a risk of selection bias—the chance that observed program impacts reflect underlying differences between study participants in the intervention and comparison groups, rather than a true effect of the program. This research brief highlights three ways to reduce the risk of selection bias and thereby improve the rigor of quasi-experimental impact evaluations, focusing specifically on evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs. (author abstract)

    Quasi-experimental evaluations of social and public health interventions often face a risk of selection bias—the chance that observed program impacts reflect underlying differences between study participants in the intervention and comparison groups, rather than a true effect of the program. This research brief highlights three ways to reduce the risk of selection bias and thereby improve the rigor of quasi-experimental impact evaluations, focusing specifically on evaluations of teen pregnancy prevention programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    Trauma is a widespread, harmful and costly public health problem. It occurs as a result of violence, abuse, neglect, loss, disaster, war and other emotionally harmful experiences. Trauma has no boundaries with regard to age, gender, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, geography, or sexual orientation. It is an almost universal experience of people with mental and substance use disorders. The need to address trauma is increasingly viewed as an important component of effective behavioral health service delivery. Additionally, it has become evident that addressing trauma requires a multi-pronged, multi-agency public health approach inclusive of public education and awareness, prevention and early identification, and effective trauma-specific assessment and treatment. In order to maximize the impact of these efforts, they need to be provided in an organizational or community context that is trauma-informed, that is, based on the knowledge and understanding of trauma and its far-reaching implications. (Author abstract)

    Trauma is a widespread, harmful and costly public health problem. It occurs as a result of violence, abuse, neglect, loss, disaster, war and other emotionally harmful experiences. Trauma has no boundaries with regard to age, gender, socioeconomic status, race, ethnicity, geography, or sexual orientation. It is an almost universal experience of people with mental and substance use disorders. The need to address trauma is increasingly viewed as an important component of effective behavioral health service delivery. Additionally, it has become evident that addressing trauma requires a multi-pronged, multi-agency public health approach inclusive of public education and awareness, prevention and early identification, and effective trauma-specific assessment and treatment. In order to maximize the impact of these efforts, they need to be provided in an organizational or community context that is trauma-informed, that is, based on the knowledge and understanding of trauma and its far-reaching implications. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program (LIHEAP)
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    Assurance 16 was added to the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program statute in 1994. Section 2605(b)(16) of the statute allows grantees to spend a limited amount of funds for Assurance 16 activities. Grantees have the option to: "use up to 5 percent of such funds, at its option, to provide services that encourage and enable households to reduce their home energy needs and thereby the need for energy assistance, including needs assessments, counseling, and assistance with energy vendors, and report to the Secretary concerning the impact of such activities on the number of households served, the level of direct benefits provided to those households, and the number of households that remain unserved." (Author introduction)

    Assurance 16 was added to the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program statute in 1994. Section 2605(b)(16) of the statute allows grantees to spend a limited amount of funds for Assurance 16 activities. Grantees have the option to: "use up to 5 percent of such funds, at its option, to provide services that encourage and enable households to reduce their home energy needs and thereby the need for energy assistance, including needs assessments, counseling, and assistance with energy vendors, and report to the Secretary concerning the impact of such activities on the number of households served, the level of direct benefits provided to those households, and the number of households that remain unserved." (Author introduction)