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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Cancian, Maria; Cook, Steven T. ; Seki, Mai; Wimer, Lynn
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Most families in the child protective services system also interact with the child support enforcement system. This study exploits a natural experiment in Wisconsin, created by the state's large regional variation in child support referral policy, to estimate a potentially important effect of child support enforcement on the duration of out-of-home foster care placement. The effect we examine is whether requiring parents to pay support to offset the costs of foster care delays children's reunification with a parent or other permanent placement. We find evidence of this unintended effect, which is important not only because longer foster care spells are expensive for taxpayers, but also because extended placements in foster care may have consequences for child well-being. Our results highlight the potential importance of cross-systems analysis and the potential consequences when the policies and fundamental objectives of public systems are inconsistently coordinated. We discuss the implications of our findings for child support and child protective services policy. (Author...

    Most families in the child protective services system also interact with the child support enforcement system. This study exploits a natural experiment in Wisconsin, created by the state's large regional variation in child support referral policy, to estimate a potentially important effect of child support enforcement on the duration of out-of-home foster care placement. The effect we examine is whether requiring parents to pay support to offset the costs of foster care delays children's reunification with a parent or other permanent placement. We find evidence of this unintended effect, which is important not only because longer foster care spells are expensive for taxpayers, but also because extended placements in foster care may have consequences for child well-being. Our results highlight the potential importance of cross-systems analysis and the potential consequences when the policies and fundamental objectives of public systems are inconsistently coordinated. We discuss the implications of our findings for child support and child protective services policy. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Woo Baidal, Jennifer A.; Nelson, Candace C.; Perkins, Meghan; Colchamiro, Rachel; Leung-Strle, Peggy; Kwass, Jo-Ann; Gortmaker, Steve L.; Davison, Kirsten K.; Taveras, Elsie M.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Objective

    To examine the extent to which a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) intervention improved BMI z scores and obesity-related behaviors among children age 2 to 4 years.

    Methods

    In two Massachusetts communities, practice changes in WIC were implemented as part of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) initiative to prevent obesity among low-income children. One WIC program was the comparison. Changes in BMI z scores pre and post intervention and prevalence of obesity-related behaviors of WIC participants were assessed. Linear mixed models were used to examine BMI z score change, and logistic regression models were used to examine changes in obesity-related behaviors in each intervention site versus comparison over 2 years.

    Results

    WIC-enrolled children in both intervention sites (vs. comparison) had improved sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and sleep duration. Compared to the comparison WIC program (n = 626), no differences were observed in BMI z score among...

    Objective

    To examine the extent to which a Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children (WIC) intervention improved BMI z scores and obesity-related behaviors among children age 2 to 4 years.

    Methods

    In two Massachusetts communities, practice changes in WIC were implemented as part of the Massachusetts Childhood Obesity Research Demonstration (MA-CORD) initiative to prevent obesity among low-income children. One WIC program was the comparison. Changes in BMI z scores pre and post intervention and prevalence of obesity-related behaviors of WIC participants were assessed. Linear mixed models were used to examine BMI z score change, and logistic regression models were used to examine changes in obesity-related behaviors in each intervention site versus comparison over 2 years.

    Results

    WIC-enrolled children in both intervention sites (vs. comparison) had improved sugar-sweetened beverage consumption and sleep duration. Compared to the comparison WIC program (n = 626), no differences were observed in BMI z score among children in Intervention Site #1 (n = 198) or #2 (n = 637). In sensitivity analyses excluding Asian children, a small decline was observed in BMI z score (−0.08 units/y [95% confidence interval: −0.14 to −0.02], P = 0.01) in Intervention Site #2 versus comparison.

    Conclusions

    Among children enrolled in WIC, the MA-CORD intervention was associated with reduced prevalence of obesity risk factors in both intervention communities and a small improvement in BMI z scores in one of two intervention communities in non-Asian children. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Crosby, Richard A.; Collins, Tom; Stradtman, Lindsay R.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    Introduction. The purpose of this pilot study was to test a community outreach model designed to help mothers in a rural, medically underserved area navigate their teen daughters to health department services for long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) or alternative contraception. Methods. The pilot study used a single-group, post-test only design. Mothers of teen daughters (N=142) received a 1-hour, one-to-one intervention session (in outreach settings) from Community Liaisons. Mothers received training on how to communicate with their daughters about LARC and other contraceptive methods. Data were collected from June through October 2014, and analyzed in September 2015. Results. The authors re-contacted 104 of 142 mothers enrolled in the study, achieving a 73.2% retention rate. Of these, 12.5% had daughters receiving LARC. An additional 11.0% had daughters with health department–verified initiation of birth control pills. Only one correlate—whether a mother believed her daughter was having sex—was associated with receiving...

    Introduction. The purpose of this pilot study was to test a community outreach model designed to help mothers in a rural, medically underserved area navigate their teen daughters to health department services for long-acting reversible contraception (LARC) or alternative contraception. Methods. The pilot study used a single-group, post-test only design. Mothers of teen daughters (N=142) received a 1-hour, one-to-one intervention session (in outreach settings) from Community Liaisons. Mothers received training on how to communicate with their daughters about LARC and other contraceptive methods. Data were collected from June through October 2014, and analyzed in September 2015. Results. The authors re-contacted 104 of 142 mothers enrolled in the study, achieving a 73.2% retention rate. Of these, 12.5% had daughters receiving LARC. An additional 11.0% had daughters with health department–verified initiation of birth control pills. Only one correlate—whether a mother believed her daughter was having sex—was associated with receiving either LARC or birth control pills. Among those indicating they knew their daughters were having sex, 31.7% of the daughters received LARC/birth control pills. By contrast, among mothers not indicating they knew their daughters were having sex, only 2.9% had daughters receiving LARC or birth control pills. Conclusions. Findings suggest that an outreach-based program delivered directly to mothers of teen daughters may be a highly effective method for enhancing service utilization of LARC and the initiation of birth control pill use in a rural, medically underserved area.  (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Anderson, Theresa
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2017

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop reports findings from an evaluation of Accelerated Opportunity and outcomes such as college credit attainment and earnings.

    This PowerPoint presentation from the 2017 NAWRS Workshop reports findings from an evaluation of Accelerated Opportunity and outcomes such as college credit attainment and earnings.

  • Individual Author: Herbst, Chris M.; Tekin, Erdal
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2016

     In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, our instrumental variables estimates suggest that children receiving subsidized child care in the year before kindergarten score lower on tests of cognitive ability and reveal more behavior problems throughout kindergarten. An auxiliary analysis of longer-run outcomes shows that these negative effects largely disappear by the time children finish first grade. (author abstract)

     In this paper, we examine the impact of U.S. child-care subsidies on the cognitive and behavioral development of children in low-income female-headed families. We identify the effect of subsidy receipt by exploiting geographic variation in the distance that families must travel from home to reach the nearest social service agency that administers the subsidy application process. Using data from the Kindergarten cohort of the Early Childhood Longitudinal Study, our instrumental variables estimates suggest that children receiving subsidized child care in the year before kindergarten score lower on tests of cognitive ability and reveal more behavior problems throughout kindergarten. An auxiliary analysis of longer-run outcomes shows that these negative effects largely disappear by the time children finish first grade. (author abstract)

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