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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Pindus, Nancy; Kingsley, G. Thomas; Biess, Jennifer; Levy, Diane; Simington, Jasmine; Hayes, Christopher
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    The centerpiece of the assessment of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) housing conditions is the first ever national survey of American Indian and Alaska Native households in tribal areas. This survey sampled 1,340 AIAN households from 38 tribal areas and achieved a response rate of 60 percent. The survey offers information not available in existing census data sources, including estimates of electrical and heating problems, physical conditions problems, and the extent of "doubling up" among AIAN households in tribal areas. The report contextualizes data from the household survey with information on demographic, social, and economic conditions and regional and historical comparisons based on the 2000 and 2010 decennial censuses and the 2006-10 American Community Survey (ACS). Analyses show that housing conditions are substantially worse among AIAN households than among all U.S. households, with overcrowding in tribal areas being especially severe. Findings from a survey of 110 tribally designated housing entities, site visits to 22 tribal areas, and data on housing...

    The centerpiece of the assessment of American Indian and Alaska Native (AIAN) housing conditions is the first ever national survey of American Indian and Alaska Native households in tribal areas. This survey sampled 1,340 AIAN households from 38 tribal areas and achieved a response rate of 60 percent. The survey offers information not available in existing census data sources, including estimates of electrical and heating problems, physical conditions problems, and the extent of "doubling up" among AIAN households in tribal areas. The report contextualizes data from the household survey with information on demographic, social, and economic conditions and regional and historical comparisons based on the 2000 and 2010 decennial censuses and the 2006-10 American Community Survey (ACS). Analyses show that housing conditions are substantially worse among AIAN households than among all U.S. households, with overcrowding in tribal areas being especially severe. Findings from a survey of 110 tribally designated housing entities, site visits to 22 tribal areas, and data on housing production before and after enactment of the Native American Housing Assistance and Self- Determination Act of 1996 (NAHASDA) show that tribes have produced and maintained low- income housing much more effectively since the passage of NAHASDA. Nominal dollars for the Indian Housing Block Grant have not been increased since 1996, however, leading to a substantial decrease in buying power. Limited funding is a key constraint for many tribes who could increase their rate of housing production if they had more funding. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Galvez, Martha M.; Simington, Jasmine; Treskon, Mark
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This report explores how public housing authorities (PHAs) granted Moving to Work (MTW) status by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) use their unique policy and fiscal flexibility to help low-income households move to opportunity-rich neighborhoods. Policy and programs adopted through MTW include changes to the tenant-based Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program or policies that increase the affordable housing supply in opportunity neighborhoods through the project-based voucher (PBV) program. We draw from an extensive review of publicly available MTW agency plans and reports that document each PHA’s initiatives. (Author abstract)

    This report explores how public housing authorities (PHAs) granted Moving to Work (MTW) status by the US Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) use their unique policy and fiscal flexibility to help low-income households move to opportunity-rich neighborhoods. Policy and programs adopted through MTW include changes to the tenant-based Housing Choice Voucher (HCV) program or policies that increase the affordable housing supply in opportunity neighborhoods through the project-based voucher (PBV) program. We draw from an extensive review of publicly available MTW agency plans and reports that document each PHA’s initiatives. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

    This portfolio of research describes all of the active or newly funded projects of our Division of Economic Independence in fiscal year 2016. The report covers five different topic areas, showing the breadth of our family self-sufficiency research.

    These topic areas include:

    •Temporary Assistance for Needy Families

    •Employment and the Labor Market

    •Education and Training

    •Behavioral Science

    •Cross-Cutting and Other Safety Net Research

    This document provides detailed summaries of each project that was active during FY16, along with brief overviews of past projects, and highlights select research findings released in 2016. The report also describes our efforts to disseminate rigorous research on welfare and family self-sufficiency topics. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Cavadel, Elizabeth W.; Kauff, Jacqueline F. ; Anderson, Mary Anne ; McConnell, Sheena M.; Derr, Michelle
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that...

    Researchers, policymakers, and practitioners are increasingly interested in the role that self-regulation may play in the ability of people to obtain and maintain employment. This interest is motivated by findings from three broad strands of research. First, research suggests self-regulation is necessary for goal setting and goal pursuit, which in turn foster positive outcomes across a variety of contexts (Deci and Ryan 2000). Second, there is growing evidence that the conditions associated with poverty can hinder the development and/or use of self-regulation skills (Mullainathan and Shafir 2013). Third, there is suggestive evidence that self-regulation skills continue to develop and improve in adulthood (Blair and Raver 2015). The report defines self-regulation and the specific self-regulation skills that may be most relevant for attaining employment-related goals. It describes how the development and use of self-regulation skills may be hindered by environmental factors, such as poverty as well as how these skills may be strengthened through interventions and strategies that have been successful in other contexts. In addition, the report provides examples of employment programs that have incorporated interventions focused on self-regulation and goal attainment and discusses the importance and challenges of measuring the success of such interventions. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Ferguson, Daniel
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract...

    President Obama signed the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG) Act of 2014 into law on November 19, 2014, reauthorizing the federal child care program for the first time since 1996. The law has important implications for child care policy across the United States, in areas including provider health and safety requirements, consumer education, subsidy redetermination, quality improvement, and tribal child care. The full statute and a plain language summary are available on the Office of Child Care website, along with continually-updated resources on the reauthorization. The following resources, which can be found in the Research Connections collection, are related to or support the implementation of the reauthorized Child Care and Development Block Grant. They have been grouped in the following categories: official guidance from the U.S. Office of Child Care; Child Care and Development Fund state plans; state policy and administrative data; and state policy options and technical assistance resource, which have been further categorized by policy topics. (Author abstract)

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