Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Federman, Maya; Short, Kathleen; Cutter IV, W Bowman; Kiely, John; Levine, David; McDough, Duane; McMillen, Marilyn
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    To understand the relationship between poverty and living conditions, a multifaceted understanding of what it means to be poor is required. In one sense, the answer to the questions "What does it mean to be poor?" is straightforward - having cash income below the official poverty line for a given family size. In a broader sense, the living conditions of the poor are difficult to measure, both because annual cash income is only one factor related to living conditions, and because the poor are quite heterogeneous. 

    This article represents an effort to get closer to the answer by summarizing findings from nine national surveys that shed light on the living conditions of individuals living in poor and nonpoor families. It differs from earlier examinations of living conditions and the material well-being of American families in that it draws upon a broader set of household surveys and attempts to maximize uniformity in the definition of family types and poverty. This work represents a coordinated effort of representatives of various Federal agencies that produce and analyze...

    To understand the relationship between poverty and living conditions, a multifaceted understanding of what it means to be poor is required. In one sense, the answer to the questions "What does it mean to be poor?" is straightforward - having cash income below the official poverty line for a given family size. In a broader sense, the living conditions of the poor are difficult to measure, both because annual cash income is only one factor related to living conditions, and because the poor are quite heterogeneous. 

    This article represents an effort to get closer to the answer by summarizing findings from nine national surveys that shed light on the living conditions of individuals living in poor and nonpoor families. It differs from earlier examinations of living conditions and the material well-being of American families in that it draws upon a broader set of household surveys and attempts to maximize uniformity in the definition of family types and poverty. This work represents a coordinated effort of representatives of various Federal agencies that produce and analyze data from nationally representative surveys. The aim in this process has been to produce measurements of material well-being for an expanded set of dimensions, following a methodology that would promote comparability across surveys as much as possible. (author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Baugher, Eleanor; Lamison-White, Leatha
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 1996

    This report presents data for calendar year 1995 on the social and economic characteristics of the population living below the poverty level. These data were compiled from information collected in the March 1996 Current Population Survey (CPS) conducted by the Bureau of the Census. The poverty definition used in most of this report was originally adopted for official government use by the Office of Management and Budget in 1969. Poverty status is defined by a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. Families or individuals with income below their appropriate poverty thresholds are classified as poor.

    The official poverty definition is based on pre-tax money income only, excluding capital gains, and does not include the value of noncash benefits such as employer-provided health insurance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, or public housing. In the early 1980’s the Census Bureau embarked on separate research programs to examine: 1) the effect of government noncash benefits on poverty and 2) the effect of taxes on measures of the...

    This report presents data for calendar year 1995 on the social and economic characteristics of the population living below the poverty level. These data were compiled from information collected in the March 1996 Current Population Survey (CPS) conducted by the Bureau of the Census. The poverty definition used in most of this report was originally adopted for official government use by the Office of Management and Budget in 1969. Poverty status is defined by a set of money income thresholds that vary by family size and composition. Families or individuals with income below their appropriate poverty thresholds are classified as poor.

    The official poverty definition is based on pre-tax money income only, excluding capital gains, and does not include the value of noncash benefits such as employer-provided health insurance, food stamps, Medicaid, Medicare, or public housing. In the early 1980’s the Census Bureau embarked on separate research programs to examine: 1) the effect of government noncash benefits on poverty and 2) the effect of taxes on measures of the distribution of income. This report contains a section entitled ‘‘Alternative Definitions of Poverty’’ which presents updated estimates of the incremental effects of benefits and taxes on poverty for 1995.

    The comparability of the data for 1995 with those from previous surveys is affected by three changes: 1) this year the March CPS is based entirely on the 1990 census sampling frame; 2) there was a reduction in the size of the sample in January 1996; and 3) people who indicate the ‘‘other race’’ category are now allocated to a specific race category. This report also includes poverty statistics on the foreign-born population for the first time. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Short, Kathleen; Shea, Martina; Eller, T. J.
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 1996

    This paper examines various methods of accounting for work related expenses (including child care expenses) in a new measure of poverty. We include a discussion of the treatment of these expenses in defining poverty. We begin with the imputation method as proposed by the Committee on National Statistics’ panel on poverty. In the report released in May of 1995, they recommend a measure of family resources that contains income that is available to buy goods and services minus expenses that cannot be used to buy goods and services. This measure subtracts work related expenditures from income before determining poverty status, along with medical out of pocket expenditures, taxes paid and so on.

    We begin with this measure and examine various alternatives using the Current Population Survey. We then use data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to update the imputations. We reestimate the imputed expenses using the CPS. We then move on to examine the effect of using reported data in the SIPP, and compare resulting distributions of work-related expenses. In all...

    This paper examines various methods of accounting for work related expenses (including child care expenses) in a new measure of poverty. We include a discussion of the treatment of these expenses in defining poverty. We begin with the imputation method as proposed by the Committee on National Statistics’ panel on poverty. In the report released in May of 1995, they recommend a measure of family resources that contains income that is available to buy goods and services minus expenses that cannot be used to buy goods and services. This measure subtracts work related expenditures from income before determining poverty status, along with medical out of pocket expenditures, taxes paid and so on.

    We begin with this measure and examine various alternatives using the Current Population Survey. We then use data from the Survey of Income and Program Participation to update the imputations. We reestimate the imputed expenses using the CPS. We then move on to examine the effect of using reported data in the SIPP, and compare resulting distributions of work-related expenses. In all cases we recompute poverty estimates to examine the effect on poverty rates of using these various methods. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Meyer, Daniel R.; Bartfeld, Judi
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    A study was conducted to examine compliance with child support orders by divorced fathers in Wisconsin between 1981 and 1989. The results revealed that compliance increased as the father's income rose and that the burden of orders did not influence compliance unless the order was for over 35 percent of the father's income. There was no evidence that the strength of family ties was related to the compliance rate, and there was only limited evidence that economic need among the mothers and children resulted in greater compliance. Although those fathers who were not paying child support were not a high-income group, they were generally not so poor that they could not afford to pay at least some support. (Author abstract)

     

    A study was conducted to examine compliance with child support orders by divorced fathers in Wisconsin between 1981 and 1989. The results revealed that compliance increased as the father's income rose and that the burden of orders did not influence compliance unless the order was for over 35 percent of the father's income. There was no evidence that the strength of family ties was related to the compliance rate, and there was only limited evidence that economic need among the mothers and children resulted in greater compliance. Although those fathers who were not paying child support were not a high-income group, they were generally not so poor that they could not afford to pay at least some support. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Moss, Philip; Tilly, Chris
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 1996

    We investigated changes in skill requirements and the effects of these changes on Black men's access to entry-level jobs, using open-ended interviews of managers at 56 firms in four industries. Managers reported that due to heightened competitive pressure, “soft skills”—particularly motivation and ability to interact well with customers and coworkers—are becoming increasingly important. Many managers view Black men as lacking in these soft skills. This helps to explain Black men's growing disadvantage in labor markets. (Author abstract)

    We investigated changes in skill requirements and the effects of these changes on Black men's access to entry-level jobs, using open-ended interviews of managers at 56 firms in four industries. Managers reported that due to heightened competitive pressure, “soft skills”—particularly motivation and ability to interact well with customers and coworkers—are becoming increasingly important. Many managers view Black men as lacking in these soft skills. This helps to explain Black men's growing disadvantage in labor markets. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Source

Year

Year ranges from 1976 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations