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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Sawicki, David S. ; Moody, Mitch
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2000

    The federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 requires that welfare recipients must find some work within 2 years of receiving welfare benefits or lose them. In Atlanta, Georgia, welfare recipients generally live in neighborhoods that are far removed from the majority of appropriate entry-level jobs. We wanted to help craft a solution to that problem. Our own work evolved through three stages. First we reviewed the research literature on spatial mismatch and the preliminary results of mobility demonstration programs elsewhere. Next we completed a spatial analysis of Atlanta's welfare recipients and entry-level jobs. And finally we designed a detailed list of projects. The final product was a successful proposal for $2 million in funding from the Jobs Access and Reverse Commute (JA/RC) grant program, authorized under PL 105-178, Section 3037 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21). Our technical data analysis capability allowed us to assume the role of initiators and organizers of the process despite the political...

    The federal Personal Responsibility and Work Opportunity Reconciliation Act of 1996 requires that welfare recipients must find some work within 2 years of receiving welfare benefits or lose them. In Atlanta, Georgia, welfare recipients generally live in neighborhoods that are far removed from the majority of appropriate entry-level jobs. We wanted to help craft a solution to that problem. Our own work evolved through three stages. First we reviewed the research literature on spatial mismatch and the preliminary results of mobility demonstration programs elsewhere. Next we completed a spatial analysis of Atlanta's welfare recipients and entry-level jobs. And finally we designed a detailed list of projects. The final product was a successful proposal for $2 million in funding from the Jobs Access and Reverse Commute (JA/RC) grant program, authorized under PL 105-178, Section 3037 of the Transportation Equity Act for the 21st Century (TEA-21). Our technical data analysis capability allowed us to assume the role of initiators and organizers of the process despite the political hurdles. In this article, we review each stage in turn and speculate on the project's likely long-run success. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Office of Planning, Research, and Evaluation, Administration for Children and Families (OPRE)
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2000

    The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), launched in Spring 1997, is an integral part of Head Start’s system of Program Performance Measures, an outcome-oriented accountability system. FACES collects data annually on a nationally representative sample of Head Start programs, classrooms, teachers, parents, and children examining the quality and effects of Head Start. The Spring 1997 field test collected data on 2,400 children and their families; the sample in later data collections was increased to 3,200 children and families in 40 programs. (author abstract)

    The Head Start Family and Child Experiences Survey (FACES), launched in Spring 1997, is an integral part of Head Start’s system of Program Performance Measures, an outcome-oriented accountability system. FACES collects data annually on a nationally representative sample of Head Start programs, classrooms, teachers, parents, and children examining the quality and effects of Head Start. The Spring 1997 field test collected data on 2,400 children and their families; the sample in later data collections was increased to 3,200 children and families in 40 programs. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Federal Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2000 is the fourth report in an annual series prepared by the Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. A collaborative effort by 20 Federal agencies, including two—the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration—that joined the Forum this year, the report is required by President Clinton’s Executive Order No. 13045. As in past years, readers will find here an accessible compendium of indicators—drawn from the most recent, most reliable official statistics—illustrative of both the promises and the difficulties confronting our Nation’s young people.

    This report updates the information presented last year, maintaining comparability with previous volumes while incorporating several improvements. For example, two data gaps that were identified in earlier reports have been addressed by establishing a background indicator to measure child care utilization and providing further details on children’s living arrangements. In addition, this year’s report includes a new...

    America’s Children: Key National Indicators of Well-Being, 2000 is the fourth report in an annual series prepared by the Interagency Forum on Child and Family Statistics. A collaborative effort by 20 Federal agencies, including two—the Environmental Protection Agency and the National Highway Traffic Safety Administration—that joined the Forum this year, the report is required by President Clinton’s Executive Order No. 13045. As in past years, readers will find here an accessible compendium of indicators—drawn from the most recent, most reliable official statistics—illustrative of both the promises and the difficulties confronting our Nation’s young people.

    This report updates the information presented last year, maintaining comparability with previous volumes while incorporating several improvements. For example, two data gaps that were identified in earlier reports have been addressed by establishing a background indicator to measure child care utilization and providing further details on children’s living arrangements. In addition, this year’s report includes a new background measure on exposure to air pollution as well as more detailed information on the causes of children’s deaths. Special feature indicators this year include measures of children’s knowledge and skills at kindergarten entry and youth involvement in volunteer activities. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Jones, Arthur F. Jr.; Weinberg, Daniel H.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    Are the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer? Historical Census Bureau income statistics can shed some ling on this debate. Although the Census Bureau has been measuring income for a half-century, and a large number of factors have been identified as contributing to changes in inequality, the causes are still not entirely understood. (author introduction)

    Are the rich getting richer and the poor getting poorer? Historical Census Bureau income statistics can shed some ling on this debate. Although the Census Bureau has been measuring income for a half-century, and a large number of factors have been identified as contributing to changes in inequality, the causes are still not entirely understood. (author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Committee on Ways and Means, U.S. House of Representatives
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2000

    After 16 previous editions, the Green Book has become a standard reference source on American social policy. It is widely used by Members of Congress and their staffs, analysts in congressional and administrative agencies, members of the media, scholars, and citizens interested in the Nation's social policy.

    This edition of the Green Book follows the basic pattern of previous editions. The volume is divided into two parts, Program Descriptions and Appendixes. In the Program Description part, separate sections are devoted to the major programs under jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means: Social Security; Medicare; Supplemental Security Income; Unemployment Compensation; Earned Entitlements for Railroad Employees; Trade Adjustment Assistance; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (Aid to Families with Dependent Children in previous editions); Child Support Enforcement; Child Care; Title XX Social Services Block Grant; Child Protection; Foster Care and Adoption Assistance; Social Welfare Programs in the Territories; Tax Provisions Related to Retirement, Health,...

    After 16 previous editions, the Green Book has become a standard reference source on American social policy. It is widely used by Members of Congress and their staffs, analysts in congressional and administrative agencies, members of the media, scholars, and citizens interested in the Nation's social policy.

    This edition of the Green Book follows the basic pattern of previous editions. The volume is divided into two parts, Program Descriptions and Appendixes. In the Program Description part, separate sections are devoted to the major programs under jurisdiction of the Committee on Ways and Means: Social Security; Medicare; Supplemental Security Income; Unemployment Compensation; Earned Entitlements for Railroad Employees; Trade Adjustment Assistance; Temporary Assistance for Needy Families (Aid to Families with Dependent Children in previous editions); Child Support Enforcement; Child Care; Title XX Social Services Block Grant; Child Protection; Foster Care and Adoption Assistance; Social Welfare Programs in the Territories; Tax Provisions Related to Retirement, Health, Poverty, Employment, Disability, and Other Social Issues; and the Pension Benefit Guaranty Corporation. A final section summarizes major social programs that are not under jurisdiction of the Committee (including food stamps, Medicaid, the State Children's Health Insurance Program, Federal housing assistance, School Lunch and Breakfast Programs, the Special Supplemental Nutrition Program for Women, Infants, and Children, the Child and Adult Care Food Program, the Workforce Investment Act, Head Start, the Low-Income Home Energy Assistance Program, veterans benefits and services, and workers' compensation).

    The Appendixes include information directly related to the programs under Committee jurisdiction, including: health care of the elderly; long-term care health care expenditures; Medicare reimbursements for hospitals and physicians; the Medicare+Choice Program; data on employment earnings, and unemployment; data on families and poverty; Federal budget tables; benefits available to noncitizens and spending on income-tested benefits in recent decades; a literature review of studies of the effects of welfare reform; and information about nonmarital births and Federal strategies to reduce nonmarital pregnancies.

    This year's Green Book contains several changes from the 1998 edition. In addition to updating data and legislative changes in all the sections and appendixes, a number of the sections have been substantially rewritten. The new section on the Temporary Assistance for Needy Families Program that was created by the 1996 welfare reform law is almost completely new. In addition, the sections on Social Security and child protection have been extensively reorganized and revised. Finally, three new appendixes have been added. One new appendix provides detailed information about the Medicare+Choice Program. Another new appendix, on which we received very helpful comments from many scholars and policy experts, reviews the large and growing research on welfare reform. The new appendix on nonmarital births, included in the Green Book at the suggestion of Senator Daniel Patrick Moynihan, provides a useful overview of historical trends in nonmarital births and recent actions taken by Congress to combat these trends. (author introduction)

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