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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Spaulding, Shayne
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Access to stable employment with adequate pay is critical for families’ stability and livelihood. The public workforce system helps job seekers access training and jobs and can contribute to the economic stability of children, yet we know little about how the system meets families’ needs. This fact sheet provides a picture of workforce program services for parents under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), based on a survey of workforce development boards (WDBs) that Urban conducted in 2017 in partnership with the National Association of Workforce Boards and Innovate+Educate. Although many WDBs are targeting families and putting in place partnerships, funding and services to meet their needs, there are opportunities to expand these efforts, to collect better data to inform services, and to improve state and federal policies that were reported as barriers to serving families. (Author abstract) 

    Access to stable employment with adequate pay is critical for families’ stability and livelihood. The public workforce system helps job seekers access training and jobs and can contribute to the economic stability of children, yet we know little about how the system meets families’ needs. This fact sheet provides a picture of workforce program services for parents under the Workforce Innovation and Opportunity Act (WIOA), based on a survey of workforce development boards (WDBs) that Urban conducted in 2017 in partnership with the National Association of Workforce Boards and Innovate+Educate. Although many WDBs are targeting families and putting in place partnerships, funding and services to meet their needs, there are opportunities to expand these efforts, to collect better data to inform services, and to improve state and federal policies that were reported as barriers to serving families. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Lerman, Robert I.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    Georgia’s economy suffered higher job losses in percentage terms than the US average during the Great Recession but regained jobs faster as well. This report examines Georgia’s job market and how to improve its performance. It covers educational, employment, and wage patterns by demographic group, family status, and region. The focus is on recent high school dropouts and graduates. The policy section reviews Georgia’s employment, training, and career-focused education programs and recommends approaches that can increase the job market success of Georgia’s young adults. One focus is on expanding apprenticeship, especially for middle-skill positions accessible to young people. (Author abstract) 

    Georgia’s economy suffered higher job losses in percentage terms than the US average during the Great Recession but regained jobs faster as well. This report examines Georgia’s job market and how to improve its performance. It covers educational, employment, and wage patterns by demographic group, family status, and region. The focus is on recent high school dropouts and graduates. The policy section reviews Georgia’s employment, training, and career-focused education programs and recommends approaches that can increase the job market success of Georgia’s young adults. One focus is on expanding apprenticeship, especially for middle-skill positions accessible to young people. (Author abstract) 

  • Individual Author: Herring, Bradley; Moffitt, Robert
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    We study whether SNAP mediates the effect of food insecurity on future health and healthcare utilization more for the extreme poor (i.e., those with income below 50% of the poverty line) than it mediates the effect for other low-income families (i.e., with incomes between 50% and 200% of the poverty line). We use data for about 23,000 people in the 2011- 2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 linked NHIS-MEPS surveys with the measures of food insecurity coming from the NHIS and the measures of SNAP benefits and various health outcomes from the MEPS. We find that SNAP significantly reduces the negative effects of food insecurity on several measures of health and healthcare-related outcomes for nonelderly adults, and that this reduction is often significantly greater for those in extreme poverty. However, we find no significant effects of this type for children. In addition, attempts to control for possible endogeneity of the SNAP effect of interest are unsuccessful because of a lack of strong instruments. Nevertheless, endogeneity of the effect of interest maybe biased downward,...

    We study whether SNAP mediates the effect of food insecurity on future health and healthcare utilization more for the extreme poor (i.e., those with income below 50% of the poverty line) than it mediates the effect for other low-income families (i.e., with incomes between 50% and 200% of the poverty line). We use data for about 23,000 people in the 2011- 2012, 2012-2013, and 2013-2014 linked NHIS-MEPS surveys with the measures of food insecurity coming from the NHIS and the measures of SNAP benefits and various health outcomes from the MEPS. We find that SNAP significantly reduces the negative effects of food insecurity on several measures of health and healthcare-related outcomes for nonelderly adults, and that this reduction is often significantly greater for those in extreme poverty. However, we find no significant effects of this type for children. In addition, attempts to control for possible endogeneity of the SNAP effect of interest are unsuccessful because of a lack of strong instruments. Nevertheless, endogeneity of the effect of interest maybe biased downward, strengthening the support of the OLS estimates as valid. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Helms, Veronica E.; Steffen, Barry L.; Rudd, Elizabeth C.; Sperling, Jon
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

    The U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the National Center for Health Statistics agreed in 2011 to link administrative records for individuals receiving housing assistance from HUD with records from the National Health Interview Survey. This report uses the linked data for 2006 through 2012 to present nationally representative estimates of demographic characteristics, health diagnoses and conditions, and health care access and utilization for HUD-assisted children ages 0–17. To provide context, similar estimates are provided for two other relevant subgroups: children residing in unassisted renter households with incomes below the federal poverty line and all children in the U.S. population. The report presents raw prevalence estimates to reflect actual conditions for each subgroup, and does not make statistical adjustments for age or other factors to support cross-group comparison of health conditions for similar individuals. Results demonstrate that assisted children suffer disproportionately from serious health conditions. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Griffen, Andrew S.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2018

    To explore the role of child care policies in the development of early cognitive skills, this paper jointly estimates a cognitive achievement production function and a dynamic, discrete choice model of maternal labor supply and child care decisions. Using counterfactuals from the model, I investigate how the design of two child care programs, Head Start and child care subsidies, affects the formation of cognitive skills through maternal work and child care decisions. The results suggest large impacts on cognitive skills from expanding Head Start to current noneligibles and negligible impacts of subsidies on cognitive skills of current eligibles. (Author abstract)

    To explore the role of child care policies in the development of early cognitive skills, this paper jointly estimates a cognitive achievement production function and a dynamic, discrete choice model of maternal labor supply and child care decisions. Using counterfactuals from the model, I investigate how the design of two child care programs, Head Start and child care subsidies, affects the formation of cognitive skills through maternal work and child care decisions. The results suggest large impacts on cognitive skills from expanding Head Start to current noneligibles and negligible impacts of subsidies on cognitive skills of current eligibles. (Author abstract)

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