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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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  • Individual Author: Redcross, Cindy; Barden, Bret; Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    This report presents interim impact and implementation findings of seven transitional jobs programs from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration. Two of the sites in that study — in Atlanta and San Francisco — are also a part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration. The two studies closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

    The report shares early results in the areas of implementation, employment outcomes, recidivism, and child support payment.

    Early results include:

    • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration programs were relatively well implemented.
    • All but one of the programs generated large increases in employment in the early months of follow-up; however, these increases were mostly or entirely the result of the transitional jobs and faded as participants left those jobs.
    • Two of the three programs targeting people recently released from prison appear to have reduced recidivism....

    This report presents interim impact and implementation findings of seven transitional jobs programs from the U.S. Department of Labor’s Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration. Two of the sites in that study — in Atlanta and San Francisco — are also a part of ACF’s Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration. The two studies closely coordinated beyond the shared sites, including shared reports, common data collection instruments, and other ongoing collaboration.

    The report shares early results in the areas of implementation, employment outcomes, recidivism, and child support payment.

    Early results include:

    • The Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration programs were relatively well implemented.
    • All but one of the programs generated large increases in employment in the early months of follow-up; however, these increases were mostly or entirely the result of the transitional jobs and faded as participants left those jobs.
    • Two of the three programs targeting people recently released from prison appear to have reduced recidivism.
    • Most programs increased payment of child support. (Author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: Fucello, Mark; O'Dell, Ben; Edin, Kathryn; Nelson, Timothy; Pate, David
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    In recent decades, policymakers have invested in responsible fatherhood programs in light of emerging research that strengthening parenting among fathers promotes positive child outcomes. This session will focus on how fatherhood programs and policies can better serve fathers, children, and their families. The panelists will discuss recent research on the changing dynamics of fatherhood in relationships and families, and opportunities for promoting father-child bonds among low-income men and boys of color. Ben O’Dell (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) will moderate this panel. Panelists are:

    • Kathryn Edin (Johns Hopkins University)

    • Timothy Nelson (Johns Hopkins University)

    • David Pate (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

    In recent decades, policymakers have invested in responsible fatherhood programs in light of emerging research that strengthening parenting among fathers promotes positive child outcomes. This session will focus on how fatherhood programs and policies can better serve fathers, children, and their families. The panelists will discuss recent research on the changing dynamics of fatherhood in relationships and families, and opportunities for promoting father-child bonds among low-income men and boys of color. Ben O’Dell (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services) will moderate this panel. Panelists are:

    • Kathryn Edin (Johns Hopkins University)

    • Timothy Nelson (Johns Hopkins University)

    • David Pate (University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee) (conference program description)

    This presentation was given at the 2014 Welfare Research and Evaluation Conference (WREC).

  • Individual Author: Bloom, Dan
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation gives an overview of the Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) funded by HHS's Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) and the Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD) funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, and it provides early data and observations from programs included in both projects.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation gives an overview of the Subsidized and Transitional Employment Demonstration (STED) funded by HHS's Office of Planning, Research and Evaluation (OPRE) and the Enhanced Transitional Jobs Demonstration (ETJD) funded by the U.S. Department of Labor, and it provides early data and observations from programs included in both projects.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Yahner, Jennifer; Zweig, Janine M.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    The Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD) a rigorous evaluation of the TJ model, designed to test its effectiveness compared to a standard set of job search (JS) activities for recently released prisoners (Redcross et al., 2010). More than 1,800 male former prisoners were randomly assigned to either a TJ program or JS program in each of four states, and their employment and recidivism outcomes were followed two years after random assignment. Despite this somewhat discouraging picture of the first-year follow-up results from the overall TJRD evaluation, it is still possible for specific TJ program strategies to have functioned successfully as mediators affecting client outcomes--and practitioners in the field are hungry for such information. Program implementers want to know about the relative contribution that different program strategies within the TJ model--such as length of time in a transitional job, receipt of job readiness/development assistance, case management services, and supportive payments--make to participant outcomes. The TJRD study provides a unique...

    The Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD) a rigorous evaluation of the TJ model, designed to test its effectiveness compared to a standard set of job search (JS) activities for recently released prisoners (Redcross et al., 2010). More than 1,800 male former prisoners were randomly assigned to either a TJ program or JS program in each of four states, and their employment and recidivism outcomes were followed two years after random assignment. Despite this somewhat discouraging picture of the first-year follow-up results from the overall TJRD evaluation, it is still possible for specific TJ program strategies to have functioned successfully as mediators affecting client outcomes--and practitioners in the field are hungry for such information. Program implementers want to know about the relative contribution that different program strategies within the TJ model--such as length of time in a transitional job, receipt of job readiness/development assistance, case management services, and supportive payments--make to participant outcomes. The TJRD study provides a unique opportunity for us to explore the comparative effectiveness of these specific TJ program components. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Jacobs, Erin
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    More than 1.6 million people are incarcerated in prisons in the United States, and around 700,000 are released from prison each year. Those released from prison often face daunting obstacles as they seek to reintegrate into their communities, and rates of recidivism are high. Many experts believe that stable employment is critical to a successful transition from prison to the community.

    The Joyce Foundation’s Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD), also funded by the JEHT Foundation and the U.S. Department of Labor, tested employment programs for former prisoners in Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, using a rigorous random assignment design. MDRC led the evaluation, along with the Urban Institute and the University of Michigan. The project focused on transitional jobs programs that provide temporary subsidized jobs, support services, and job placement help. Transitional jobs are seen as a promising model for former prisoners and for other disadvantaged groups.

    In 2007-2008, more than 1,800 men who had...

    More than 1.6 million people are incarcerated in prisons in the United States, and around 700,000 are released from prison each year. Those released from prison often face daunting obstacles as they seek to reintegrate into their communities, and rates of recidivism are high. Many experts believe that stable employment is critical to a successful transition from prison to the community.

    The Joyce Foundation’s Transitional Jobs Reentry Demonstration (TJRD), also funded by the JEHT Foundation and the U.S. Department of Labor, tested employment programs for former prisoners in Chicago, Detroit, Milwaukee, and St. Paul, using a rigorous random assignment design. MDRC led the evaluation, along with the Urban Institute and the University of Michigan. The project focused on transitional jobs programs that provide temporary subsidized jobs, support services, and job placement help. Transitional jobs are seen as a promising model for former prisoners and for other disadvantaged groups.

    In 2007-2008, more than 1,800 men who had recently been released from prison were assigned, at random, to a transitional jobs program or to a program providing basic job search assistance but no subsidized jobs. The research team tracked both groups using state data on employment and recidivism. Because of the random assignment design, one can be confident that significant differences that emerged between the groups are attributable to the services each group received.

    This is the final report in the TJRD project. It assesses how the transitional jobs programs affected employment and recidivism during the two years after people entered the study. (author abstract)

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