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SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Newman, Leigh Ann
    Reference Type: Conference Paper
    Year: 2014

    The presentation provides information about supports for transition aged youth (TAY) in foster care to help them achieve self-sufficiency, particularly supports for disabled TAY.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

    The presentation provides information about supports for transition aged youth (TAY) in foster care to help them achieve self-sufficiency, particularly supports for disabled TAY.

    This presentation was given at the 2014 National Association of Welfare Research and Statistics (NAWRS) Annual Workshop.

  • Individual Author: Osilla, Karen O.; Van Busum, Kristin R.
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2012

    As large numbers of service members and veterans, many with serious injuries, return from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is critical to examine the types of return-to-work resources available to help wounded warriors obtain and retain gainful employment and to understand the effectiveness of these programs. RAND researchers examined existing return-to-work policies and programs for military men and women with service-related injuries and conducted an initial review of the available literature on return-to-work resources, focusing when possible on policies and programs specifically available for service members and veterans with physical injuries. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs should seek to build the evidence base concerning return-to-work programs, in order to understand which programs are most effective, which provide a return on investment, and what strategies are needed to encourage service members and veterans to utilize them (e.g., coordination). The DoD and the VA have been and will continue to be held accountable for the...

    As large numbers of service members and veterans, many with serious injuries, return from Iraq and Afghanistan, it is critical to examine the types of return-to-work resources available to help wounded warriors obtain and retain gainful employment and to understand the effectiveness of these programs. RAND researchers examined existing return-to-work policies and programs for military men and women with service-related injuries and conducted an initial review of the available literature on return-to-work resources, focusing when possible on policies and programs specifically available for service members and veterans with physical injuries. The Department of Defense and the Department of Veterans Affairs should seek to build the evidence base concerning return-to-work programs, in order to understand which programs are most effective, which provide a return on investment, and what strategies are needed to encourage service members and veterans to utilize them (e.g., coordination). The DoD and the VA have been and will continue to be held accountable for the successful reintegration of service members and veterans who have been injured while serving. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Gimm, Gilbert; Weathers, Bob
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2007

    The Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment (DMIE), a grant program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, awards funds to states to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that are intended to improve health care coverage and employment services for working adults with potentially disabling conditions such as diabetes and mental illness. Authorized by the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, the DMIE allows states to provide Medicaid-equivalent coverage or “wrap-around” coverage, which supplements existing health insurance. They also may offer employment-support and case management services that increase the likelihood of sustained employment. Four states were approved as of June 2007 under the most recent DMIE solicitation—Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, and Texas.

    This issue brief, the sixth in a series on workers with disabilities, reviews the rationale for the DMIE, the interventions in the four most recent DMIE states, the DMIE evaluation, and next steps in disseminating information about the effects...

    The Demonstration to Maintain Independence and Employment (DMIE), a grant program administered by the Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services, awards funds to states to develop, implement, and evaluate interventions that are intended to improve health care coverage and employment services for working adults with potentially disabling conditions such as diabetes and mental illness. Authorized by the Ticket to Work and Work Incentives Improvement Act of 1999, the DMIE allows states to provide Medicaid-equivalent coverage or “wrap-around” coverage, which supplements existing health insurance. They also may offer employment-support and case management services that increase the likelihood of sustained employment. Four states were approved as of June 2007 under the most recent DMIE solicitation—Hawaii, Kansas, Minnesota, and Texas.

    This issue brief, the sixth in a series on workers with disabilities, reviews the rationale for the DMIE, the interventions in the four most recent DMIE states, the DMIE evaluation, and next steps in disseminating information about the effects of these innovative demonstration projects. (author abstract)