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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: The President's Task Force on Environmental Health Risks and Safety Risks to Children
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2016

    Lead exposure has been linked to a number of health effects in children. The United States has made tremendous progress in reducing lead exposure, resulting in lower childhood blood lead levels over time. This progress has resulted, in part, from the enforcement of multiple U.S. regulations and implementation of numerous federal programs that aim to reduce childhood lead exposures or ameliorate its effects.

    Today, about 3.6 million U.S. families with a child under age 6 years live in a home with one or more conditions that can expose their child to levels of lead that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers hazardous. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses a reference level of  5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (ug/dL) to identify children whose blood lead levels are much higher than most children’s levels and recommend initiation of public health actions. Approximately 500,000 children ages 1 to 5 years exceed the reference level, which is based on the U.S. population of children ages 1 to  5 years who are in the highest 2.5%...

    Lead exposure has been linked to a number of health effects in children. The United States has made tremendous progress in reducing lead exposure, resulting in lower childhood blood lead levels over time. This progress has resulted, in part, from the enforcement of multiple U.S. regulations and implementation of numerous federal programs that aim to reduce childhood lead exposures or ameliorate its effects.

    Today, about 3.6 million U.S. families with a child under age 6 years live in a home with one or more conditions that can expose their child to levels of lead that the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) considers hazardous. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) uses a reference level of  5 micrograms of lead per deciliter of blood (ug/dL) to identify children whose blood lead levels are much higher than most children’s levels and recommend initiation of public health actions. Approximately 500,000 children ages 1 to 5 years exceed the reference level, which is based on the U.S. population of children ages 1 to  5 years who are in the highest 2.5% of children when tested for lead in their blood. However, no safe blood lead level in children has been identified. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Choi, Laura; Erickson, David; Griffin, Kate; Levere, Andrea; Seidman, Ellen
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2015

    This book examines the concept of financial health and well-being from many perspectives, bringing together the voices of long-time champions of financial capability and newer voices hailing from a variety of sectors, such as public health, criminal justice, and business. What unites them is the shared recognition that we must do more to help all Americans have control over their financial lives and achieve their financial goals. As represented on the book’s cover, financial health and well-being is the bridge to a strong financial future, connecting individuals and families to greater opportunity, creating more vibrant communities, and in turn, strengthening the social and economic fabric of our nation. (Author introduction)

    This book examines the concept of financial health and well-being from many perspectives, bringing together the voices of long-time champions of financial capability and newer voices hailing from a variety of sectors, such as public health, criminal justice, and business. What unites them is the shared recognition that we must do more to help all Americans have control over their financial lives and achieve their financial goals. As represented on the book’s cover, financial health and well-being is the bridge to a strong financial future, connecting individuals and families to greater opportunity, creating more vibrant communities, and in turn, strengthening the social and economic fabric of our nation. (Author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Siegwarth, Allison Wishon; Blyler, Crystal
    Reference Type: Stakeholder Resource
    Year: 2014

    This Brief explores the provisions of the Affordable Care Act that may enable Americans with mental illness to obtain the mental health treatment and support services they need to continue working or get back to work. (author abstract)

    This Brief explores the provisions of the Affordable Care Act that may enable Americans with mental illness to obtain the mental health treatment and support services they need to continue working or get back to work. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hearne, Jane
    Year: 2005

    Medicaid is a means-tested entitlement program that is largely designed and administered by states under broad federal rules. The programs are jointly financed by federal and state funds. Federal contributions to each state are based on a state's willingness to finance covered medical services and a matching formula. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is responsible for federal oversight of the program. In FY2003, preliminary federal and state spending on Medicaid reached $275.5 billion, exceeding Medicare payments, net of premiums, by over $15 billion. 

    Medicaid coverage for non-elderly, non-disabled adults and children is provided to people who qualify through a number of pathways, some of which are required under federal law, others are optional for states. State programs are required to provide coverage to families based on welfare program rules in effect in 1996. Coverage for children goes beyond those often very low financial criteria through a combination of other mandatory and...

    Medicaid is a means-tested entitlement program that is largely designed and administered by states under broad federal rules. The programs are jointly financed by federal and state funds. Federal contributions to each state are based on a state's willingness to finance covered medical services and a matching formula. The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services (CMS), within the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS), is responsible for federal oversight of the program. In FY2003, preliminary federal and state spending on Medicaid reached $275.5 billion, exceeding Medicare payments, net of premiums, by over $15 billion. 

    Medicaid coverage for non-elderly, non-disabled adults and children is provided to people who qualify through a number of pathways, some of which are required under federal law, others are optional for states. State programs are required to provide coverage to families based on welfare program rules in effect in 1996. Coverage for children goes beyond those often very low financial criteria through a combination of other mandatory and optional pathways. Low income pregnant women can also receive Medicaid coverage through both mandatory and optional pathways. In addition, a number of other optional pathways exist for special groups of people who are not considered disabled because they do not have a disability as defined under the Supplemental Security Income (SSI) program rules. Some of those groups include, for example, certain women with breast or cervical cancer, uninsured individuals diagnosed with tuberculosis, people who become impoverished by their medical costs, and certain immigrants. 

    Variation across the state-based programs is the rule. Income eligibility levels and services covered vary, and the method for, and amount of, reimbursement for services differ from state to state. Medicaid is targeted to individuals with low-income, but not all of the poor are eligible, and not all of those who are covered are poor. For Medicaid-covered children and families, primary and acute care is often delivered through managed care organizations, while elderly enrollees and those with disabilities more often obtain such care on a fee-for-service basis. In recent years, more and more states have implemented a variety of major program changes using special waiver authority. 

    This report describes federal Medicaid eligibility rules for children and adults but does not address eligibility pathways for individuals qualifying on the basis of having a disability or for persons who are age 65 and over. This report is one of a number of CRS reports on Medicaid and will be updated periodically. (author abstract)

     

  • Individual Author: U.S. Department of Health and Human Services
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2001

    This Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 1999) documents the existence of striking disparities for minorities in mental health services and the underlying knowledge base. Racial and ethnic minorities have less access to mental health services than do whites. They are less likely to receive needed care. When they receive care, it is more likely to be poor in quality. This Supplement covers the four most recognized racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. According to Federal classifications, African Americans (blacks), American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and white Americans (whites) are races. Hispanic American (Latino) is an ethnicity and may apply to a person of any race (U.S. Office of Management and Budget [OMB], 1978). For example, many people from the Dominican Republic identify their ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino and their race as black. (Author introduction)

    This Supplement to Mental Health: A Report of the Surgeon General (U.S. Department of Health and Human Services [DHHS], 1999) documents the existence of striking disparities for minorities in mental health services and the underlying knowledge base. Racial and ethnic minorities have less access to mental health services than do whites. They are less likely to receive needed care. When they receive care, it is more likely to be poor in quality. This Supplement covers the four most recognized racial and ethnic minority groups in the United States. According to Federal classifications, African Americans (blacks), American Indians and Alaska Natives, Asian Americans and Pacific Islanders, and white Americans (whites) are races. Hispanic American (Latino) is an ethnicity and may apply to a person of any race (U.S. Office of Management and Budget [OMB], 1978). For example, many people from the Dominican Republic identify their ethnicity as Hispanic or Latino and their race as black. (Author introduction)

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