Skip to main content
Back to Top

SSRC Library

The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

Writing a paper? Working on a literature review? Citing research in a funding proposal? Use the SSRC Citation Assistance Tool to compile citations.

  • Conduct a search and filter parameters as desired.
  • "Check" the box next to the resources for which you would like a citation.
  • Select "Download Selected Citation" at the top of the Library Search Page.
  • Select your export style:
    • Text File.
    • RIS Format.
    • APA format.
  • Select submit and download your citations.

The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Henly, Julia R.; Adams, Gina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2018

    In recent decades, policymakers have increasingly focused on the importance of high-quality child care and early education services in supporting the development of low-income children. Though highquality early care and education (ECE) can exist in any setting—including child care centers, family child care programs, and other home-based care arrangements—the emphasis on high-quality ECE services has often translated into a singular focus on investing public funds in formal settings, especially centerbased programs.

    This report explores the implications of this trend in the context of the 2014 reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), also known as the Child Care and Development Fund. It focuses on four priority populations: families with parents working nontraditional schedules, families with infants and toddlers, families living in rural areas, and families with children with disabilities and special needs. It concludes with a discussion of state policy strategies to better address the child care needs of these families.

    Our goal in...

    In recent decades, policymakers have increasingly focused on the importance of high-quality child care and early education services in supporting the development of low-income children. Though highquality early care and education (ECE) can exist in any setting—including child care centers, family child care programs, and other home-based care arrangements—the emphasis on high-quality ECE services has often translated into a singular focus on investing public funds in formal settings, especially centerbased programs.

    This report explores the implications of this trend in the context of the 2014 reauthorization of the Child Care and Development Block Grant (CCDBG), also known as the Child Care and Development Fund. It focuses on four priority populations: families with parents working nontraditional schedules, families with infants and toddlers, families living in rural areas, and families with children with disabilities and special needs. It concludes with a discussion of state policy strategies to better address the child care needs of these families.

    Our goal in this report is twofold: First, to help policymakers and other policy stakeholders understand how current policy strategies and trends toward center-based care may be inadvertently challenging the ability of vulnerable groups of families to access subsidies and take advantage of public investments in child care quality. And second, to contribute to informed and strategic policy efforts to increase access to and the supply of high-quality care for all children across the spectrum of child care settings. (Edited author executive summary)

  • Individual Author: Grobe, Deana; Davis, Elizabeth E.; Scott, Ellen K.; Weber, Roberta B.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2017

    In the United States, government subsidies help low-income families pay for child care when parents are working, yet policies that tie subsidy eligibility closely to employment may result in frequent disruptions in program participation for families. This paper uses a mixed methods research design that links administrative records on families and children to data collected through surveys and in-depth interviews to examine employment instability and job characteristics of parents using child care subsidies. The results suggest that parents experience substantial employment instability (employment loss and unpredictable schedules) and that exiting the subsidy program is frequently related to employment-related eligibility factors. Overall, the use of administrative data integrated with other methods provides substantial opportunities for researchers to explore complex social phenomenon and provide insights in the evaluation of social programs. (Author abstract)

    In the United States, government subsidies help low-income families pay for child care when parents are working, yet policies that tie subsidy eligibility closely to employment may result in frequent disruptions in program participation for families. This paper uses a mixed methods research design that links administrative records on families and children to data collected through surveys and in-depth interviews to examine employment instability and job characteristics of parents using child care subsidies. The results suggest that parents experience substantial employment instability (employment loss and unpredictable schedules) and that exiting the subsidy program is frequently related to employment-related eligibility factors. Overall, the use of administrative data integrated with other methods provides substantial opportunities for researchers to explore complex social phenomenon and provide insights in the evaluation of social programs. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Daly, Mary
    Reference Type: Report, White Papers
    Year: 2015

    This paper examines policies for the support of families with children, in particular child-related financial transfers and early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. The analysis is mainly focused on countries with institutionalized welfare states – primarily Western European and other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries – because that is where child-related benefits and services have the longest history. It focuses on the unfolding of the relevant transfers and services from the period of their inception in the early decades of the 20th century to the reforms that are currently underway. The paper highlights a number of core insights relevant to policy planning and decision-making for child-related transfers and ECEC services: Child-related financial transfers and ECEC services should not be seen as alternatives to each other, both are needed to provide continuous support across the life cycle. Children's needs and well-being should be at the forefront when these policies are designed and put in place. While this may appear self-...

    This paper examines policies for the support of families with children, in particular child-related financial transfers and early childhood education and care (ECEC) services. The analysis is mainly focused on countries with institutionalized welfare states – primarily Western European and other Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) countries – because that is where child-related benefits and services have the longest history. It focuses on the unfolding of the relevant transfers and services from the period of their inception in the early decades of the 20th century to the reforms that are currently underway. The paper highlights a number of core insights relevant to policy planning and decision-making for child-related transfers and ECEC services: Child-related financial transfers and ECEC services should not be seen as alternatives to each other, both are needed to provide continuous support across the life cycle. Children's needs and well-being should be at the forefront when these policies are designed and put in place. While this may appear self-evident, policies that are intended to meet several objectives can result in a situation where the needs of children are not at the heart of the measures that are assumed to benefit them. The paper also underlines the need for gender equality to be a frontline consideration in this (as in other) policy domains. This paper was produced for UN Women's flagship report Progress of the World's Women 2015-2016, and is released as part of the UN Women discussion paper series. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Crouter, Ann C.; Booth, Alan
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book
    Year: 2014

    Interdisciplinary in nature, this volume brings together contributors from the fields of psychology, social work, sociology, demography, economics, human development and family studies, and public policy. It presents important work-family topics from the point of view of low-income families at a time in history when welfare to work programs have become standard. Divided into four parts, each section addresses a different aspect of the topic, consisting of a big picture lead essay followed by three papers that critique, extend, and supplement the final paper.  The primary audience for the book is academicians and their students, policy specialists, and people charged with developing and evaluating family-focused programs. [author abstract]

    Table of Contents

    Preface

    Part I: How Has the Availability, Content, and Stability of the Jobs Available for the Working Poor Changed in Recent Decades? 

    The Low-Wage Labor Market: Trends and Policy Implications. J. Bernstein

    Labor Market and Family Trends and Public...

    Interdisciplinary in nature, this volume brings together contributors from the fields of psychology, social work, sociology, demography, economics, human development and family studies, and public policy. It presents important work-family topics from the point of view of low-income families at a time in history when welfare to work programs have become standard. Divided into four parts, each section addresses a different aspect of the topic, consisting of a big picture lead essay followed by three papers that critique, extend, and supplement the final paper.  The primary audience for the book is academicians and their students, policy specialists, and people charged with developing and evaluating family-focused programs. [author abstract]

    Table of Contents

    Preface

    Part I: How Has the Availability, Content, and Stability of the Jobs Available for the Working Poor Changed in Recent Decades? 

    The Low-Wage Labor Market: Trends and Policy Implications. J. Bernstein

    Labor Market and Family Trends and Public Policy Responses. P. England

    Beyond Low Wages: Underemployment in America. L. Jensen, T. Slack

    Changing Families, Shifting Economic Fortunes, and Meeting Basic Needs. L.M. Casper, R.B. King

    Part II: What Features of Work Timing Matter for Families?

    Employment in a 24/7 Economy: Challenges for the Family. H.B. Presser

    The Time and Timing of Work: Unique Challenges Facing Low-Income Families. M. Perry-Jenkins

    Exploring Process and Control in Families Working Nonstandard Schedules. K. Daly

    Using Daily Diaries to Assess Temporal Friction Between Work and Family. D.M. Almeida

    Part III: How Are the Childcare Needs of Low-Income Families Being Met?

    Childcare for Low-Income Families: Problems and Promises. A.C. Huston

    The Crisis of Care. C.C. Raver, Childcare as a Work Support, a Child-Focused Intervention, and a Job. B. Thorne

    Childcare for Low-Income Families: Problems and Promise. M. Zaslow

    Part IV: How Are the Challenges of Managing Work and Family Experienced by Low-Income Men and Women?

    "Making a Way Out of No Way": How Mothers Meet Basic Family Needs While Moving From Welfare to Work. S. Clampet-Lundquist, K. Edin, A. London, E. Scott, V. Hunter

    Should Promoting Marriage Be the Next Stage of Welfare Reform? B.R. Karney, S.H. Springer

    Making Our Way Together: Collaboration in the Move From Welfare to Work. L.A. Bond, A.M.C. Hauf

    The Growing Compliance Burden for Recipients of Public Assistance. A.J. Cherlin

    Balancing Work and Family: Problems and Solutions for Low-Income Families. D.N. Hawkins, S.D. Whiteman

  • Individual Author: Bernal, Raquel; Keane, Michael P.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2011

    We evaluate the effect of child care versus maternal time inputs on child cognitive development using single mothers from the NLSY79. To deal with nonrandom selection of children into child care, we exploit the exogenous variation in welfare policy rules facing single mothers. In particular, the 1996 welfare reform and earlier state-level policy changes generated substantial increases in their work/child care use. We construct a comprehensive set of welfare policy variables and use them as instruments to estimate child cognitive ability production functions. In our baseline specification, we estimate that a year of child care reduces child test scores by 2.1%. (Author abstract)

    We evaluate the effect of child care versus maternal time inputs on child cognitive development using single mothers from the NLSY79. To deal with nonrandom selection of children into child care, we exploit the exogenous variation in welfare policy rules facing single mothers. In particular, the 1996 welfare reform and earlier state-level policy changes generated substantial increases in their work/child care use. We construct a comprehensive set of welfare policy variables and use them as instruments to estimate child cognitive ability production functions. In our baseline specification, we estimate that a year of child care reduces child test scores by 2.1%. (Author abstract)

Sort by

Topical Area(s)

Popular Searches

Year

Year ranges from 1991 to 2018

Reference Type

Research Methodology

Geographic Focus

Target Populations