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The SSRC Library allows visitors to access materials related to self-sufficiency programs, practice and research. Visitors can view common search terms, conduct a keyword search or create a custom search using any combination of the filters at the left side of this page. To conduct a keyword search, type a term or combination of terms into the search box below, select whether you want to search the exact phrase or the words in any order, and click on the blue button to the right of the search box to view relevant results.

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The SSRC Library includes resources which may be available only via journal subscription. The SSRC may be able to provide users without subscription access to a particular journal with a single use copy of the full text.  Please email the SSRC with your request.

The SSRC Library collection is constantly growing and new research is added regularly. We welcome our users to submit a library item to help us grow our collection in response to your needs.


  • Individual Author: Duane, Marina; La Vigne, Nancy G.; Reimal, Emily; Lynch, Mathew
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2017

    Criminal background checks continue to be a routine practice among many employers in the United States. According to a recent survey, almost 60 percent of employers screen job applicants for their criminal histories. Despite their prevalence, criminal background checks often generate flawed or incomplete reports, with some reports failing to include conviction information. Such flaws may undermine the value of the screenings to employers and prevent suitable candidates who pose no additional risk to the public from securing a job. This report examines criminal background checks as a significant collateral consequence for justice-involved people and explores the importance of employment to reducing recidivism. (Author abstract)

    Criminal background checks continue to be a routine practice among many employers in the United States. According to a recent survey, almost 60 percent of employers screen job applicants for their criminal histories. Despite their prevalence, criminal background checks often generate flawed or incomplete reports, with some reports failing to include conviction information. Such flaws may undermine the value of the screenings to employers and prevent suitable candidates who pose no additional risk to the public from securing a job. This report examines criminal background checks as a significant collateral consequence for justice-involved people and explores the importance of employment to reducing recidivism. (Author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Sommer, Teresa Eckrich; Sabol, Terri; Smith, Tara; Dow, Steven; Barczak, Monica; Chase-Lansdale, P. Lindsay; Brooks-Gunn, Jeanne; Yoshikawa, Hirokazu; King, Christopher T.
    Reference Type: Book Chapter/Book, Report
    Year: 2015

    Two-generation programs - which provide workforce development, skills training, and social capital development to parents while their children attend quality early childhood education programs - are a promising anti-poverty strategy and are gaining interest across the country. Early childhood education programs, like Head Start and Early Head Start, are central resources for improving the life opportunities of low-income children. Yet, few early learning centers explicitly target parents for postsecondary education and career training, despite the fact that increased parental education and family income are associated with better outcomes for children. The Community Action Project of Tulsa County, Oklahoma (CAP Tulsa) is at the forefront of innovation, implementation, and evaluation of two-generation programming. CAP Tulsa is a large, comprehensive antipoverty agency that focuses on early childhood education and economic security for families; it also serves as the Head Start and Early Head Start grantee for Tulsa County. It is one of the only fully operational, two-generation...

    Two-generation programs - which provide workforce development, skills training, and social capital development to parents while their children attend quality early childhood education programs - are a promising anti-poverty strategy and are gaining interest across the country. Early childhood education programs, like Head Start and Early Head Start, are central resources for improving the life opportunities of low-income children. Yet, few early learning centers explicitly target parents for postsecondary education and career training, despite the fact that increased parental education and family income are associated with better outcomes for children. The Community Action Project of Tulsa County, Oklahoma (CAP Tulsa) is at the forefront of innovation, implementation, and evaluation of two-generation programming. CAP Tulsa is a large, comprehensive antipoverty agency that focuses on early childhood education and economic security for families; it also serves as the Head Start and Early Head Start grantee for Tulsa County. It is one of the only fully operational, two-generation human capital programs that combine early childhood education services with stackable career training for parents. In 2010, CAP Tulsa was the recipient of a large federal award from the Administration for Children and Families (ACF) to bring its novel two-generation program to scale. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Simms, Margaret; McDaniel, Marla; Monson, William; Fortuny, Karina
    Reference Type: Report
    Year: 2013

    A large number of US men of prime working age are neither gainfully employed nor pursuing education or other training, suggesting a potentially significant disconnection from mainstream economic and social life. This paper concentrates on the experiences and challenges of men at the margins between the ages of 18 and 44, when most American males are engaged in such activities as working and building skills, forming and strengthening families, and linking to social institutions. The review focuses on their experiences in five domains: education, employment, family, criminal justice, and health, featuring key themes from ethnographic and other qualitative research. (author abstract)

    A large number of US men of prime working age are neither gainfully employed nor pursuing education or other training, suggesting a potentially significant disconnection from mainstream economic and social life. This paper concentrates on the experiences and challenges of men at the margins between the ages of 18 and 44, when most American males are engaged in such activities as working and building skills, forming and strengthening families, and linking to social institutions. The review focuses on their experiences in five domains: education, employment, family, criminal justice, and health, featuring key themes from ethnographic and other qualitative research. (author abstract)

  • Individual Author: Hatcher, Daniel L.
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2013

    Poor fathers like John are largely forgotten, written off as a subset of the unworthy poor. These fathers struggle with poverty - often with near hopelessness - within multiple systems in which they are either entangled or overlooked, such as child-support and welfare programs, family courts, the criminal justice system, housing programs, and the healthcare, education, and foster-care systems. For these impoverished fathers, the "end of men" is often not simply a question for purposes of discussion but a fact that is all too real. In the instances in which poor fathers are not forgotten, they are targeted as causes of poverty rather than as possible victims themselves - or more accurately they fall somewhere along the false dichotomy between pure blame and pure sympathy. The poor fathers are lumped together in monolithic descriptions that become constants in equations attempting to understand and solve societal ills. If a continuously evolving factor is treated as a known constant rather than an undetermined variable, the math will inevitably be wrong. Thus, the essentialist...

    Poor fathers like John are largely forgotten, written off as a subset of the unworthy poor. These fathers struggle with poverty - often with near hopelessness - within multiple systems in which they are either entangled or overlooked, such as child-support and welfare programs, family courts, the criminal justice system, housing programs, and the healthcare, education, and foster-care systems. For these impoverished fathers, the "end of men" is often not simply a question for purposes of discussion but a fact that is all too real. In the instances in which poor fathers are not forgotten, they are targeted as causes of poverty rather than as possible victims themselves - or more accurately they fall somewhere along the false dichotomy between pure blame and pure sympathy. The poor fathers are lumped together in monolithic descriptions that become constants in equations attempting to understand and solve societal ills. If a continuously evolving factor is treated as a known constant rather than an undetermined variable, the math will inevitably be wrong. Thus, the essentialist policy equations created from the uniform view and treatment of low-income fathers will inevitably result in incorrect policy solutions to system concerns. Moreover, each system's equation - already incorrectly constructed - is further impacted and skewed by the unplanned interactions with incorrect equations of other systems. (Excerpt from author introduction)

  • Individual Author: Lipsitz, George
    Reference Type: Journal Article
    Year: 2012

    In our society, individual acts of intentional discrimination function in concert with historically created vulnerabilities; these vulnerabilities are based on disfavored identity categories and amplify each injustice and injury. Although anyone can be a victim of housing discrimination, women of color suffer distinct collateral injuries from barriers to housing that are collective and cumulative in nature. At the intersections of race and gender, the welfare and dignity of black women and Latinas are undermined by the national failure to enforce fair housing and fair employment laws, by the concentration of poverty in neighborhoods inhabited largely by blacks and Latinos, by the criminalization of poverty, by the proliferation of punishments inside the criminal justice system, and by the expansion of the collateral consequences of arrests and criminal convictions in society at large. Produced by a plethora of public policies and private actions, these injuries entail more than denials of rights and resources to individuals. They evidence the existence and extent of a...

    In our society, individual acts of intentional discrimination function in concert with historically created vulnerabilities; these vulnerabilities are based on disfavored identity categories and amplify each injustice and injury. Although anyone can be a victim of housing discrimination, women of color suffer distinct collateral injuries from barriers to housing that are collective and cumulative in nature. At the intersections of race and gender, the welfare and dignity of black women and Latinas are undermined by the national failure to enforce fair housing and fair employment laws, by the concentration of poverty in neighborhoods inhabited largely by blacks and Latinos, by the criminalization of poverty, by the proliferation of punishments inside the criminal justice system, and by the expansion of the collateral consequences of arrests and criminal convictions in society at large. Produced by a plethora of public policies and private actions, these injuries entail more than denials of rights and resources to individuals. They evidence the existence and extent of a concentrated political attack on communities of color. Women play a central role in these practices because punitive policies are almost always legitimated by allegations of nonnormative behavior by poor people and people of color, allegations that occlude the actual intersectional vulnerabilities created by multiple forms of raced and gendered exploitation inscribed inside the routine practices of contemporary capitalism. This Article delineates how housing and employment discrimination combine to make black women and Latinas particularly vulnerable to surveillance, arrest, and incarceration. It shows how race and gender discrimination make reentry into society especially difficult for women ex-offenders from aggrieved communities of color. It establishes the historical causes and consequences of moral panics about the putative misbehavior of women of color, and it concludes by proposing a combination of litigation, legislation, and social mobilization to address the execrable consequences of intersectional discrimination and mass incarceration. (author abstract)

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